dustysspanishleo

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About dustysspanishleo

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  1. Just jumped on because I was thinking of one of the old members on FB. I haven't logged in in ages, but I miss the good ole days. I don't know anything that's gone on -- ****, I think my profile photo is a horse I sold 5 or 6 years ago. That said, can I get an update? Whatever happened with BRoo and fergus after the whole police debacle? Whatever happened with Wheeler? Does she have horses - was she ever prosecuted? Bumper was banned, no? Why? GSDLeader? Is Mudder gone? SweetCaroline? Feel free to PM me. I don't stay on forums much, but it's weird to remember certain events/people/etc and not know what happened. Edit: Yeah, definitely a horse I sold 5-6 years ago.
  2. Haha don't I know it! But really, they want a pasture pony who will do occasional trail rides - really low key. However, it's been at least three years since I've had horses at home and more than a year since I've had them not in full training and I simply couldn't remember rough estimates on costs - especially for what they're wanting to do. SJL - I'm glad someone does! I know a lot of the old crew is gone, but sometimes I feel like I was hardly ever noticed. Not sure how, but definitely slipped through the cracks. Haha Is HC coming back around? Worth it to stick around for a bit? Or is it still SSDD? ;)
  3. I haven't been on in YEARS - though I pop up on COTH occasionally when I have down time. I logged on today as I'm trying to find "average" horse costs for a coworker who was asking. Saw this thread and OF COURSE had to chime in. Hope everyone is well! I'm on to different horses than I had when I was around -- aside from my one mare who won the APHA Amatuer Jumping World Championship with me this year. I'll come back and visit and catch up this weekend.
  4. I think the problem lies in the fact that people's brains are changing and I'm not sure that older generations can truly accept that and are willing to adapt to it. I read a news story, which I cannot for the life of me find right now, that essentially says with technology making its way into our lives people don't have to think like they used to -- they're able to move faster, they don't have to memorize as much, etc. Everything is at the tip of their fingers. Life hasn't adjusted to this fundamental change. I did pull this news article regarding fast-moving cartoons and the affect on the brain of a young child -- News Article. It's very interesting, I feel like the diagnosis is not so much of a disease in most cases, it's just that we've evolved and people don't understand how to function quite yet with a new "standard" of the way the younger generations brains are working. They tend to think something is wrong and medicate it to return to the standard version of what's considered "normal" for a society that didn't grow up with Blackberries and iPads.
  5. I recommend you steer clear of an all purpose. It's just TOO easy to put yourself in a chair seat, especially with a stock type horse and once you start riding like that, it's a HARD habit to break. I have two Bevals and a Verhan. I used to ride in a Collegiate and it, unfortunately, gave me just about the worst chair seat of my life. There is a Beval on usedsaddles for $395. http://www.usedsaddles.com/product.htm?id=k5j2mhkx It's a 17'' close contact. I personally dislike big knee rolls on saddles for beginner thru intermediate riders -- I've found they have a tendency to develop pinching at the knee, which is a problem for a lot of people anyway. I also prefer a flat saddle, simply because I find that I 1) have to ride much more correctly with my leg and can't rely on the saddle so much to save me and 2) I'm more able to stay balanced with my horses over fences. I feel "stuck" in a deeper saddle. I feel like the Courbette you posted is going to give you a bad chair seat, but I could be wrong having not seen you or how it fits the horse. Good luck in your search!
  6. Just an update... Went and saw him this morning. He's doing well! Vet said that he was hard to get under, due to his sheer size (He's 17.1 hh and as wide as a house) and then once he was under, hard to maneuver onto the table -- but once he was up, it just required the one incision and they were able to take the large colon from where it had fallen up near his heart girth, back to where it should be, around the flank. From what they can tell, it had moved when his spleen enlarged and then when they got the spleen back down to size, gravity took it's toll and the intestine wasn't able to move naturally back to where it had been, resulting in a very slight twist -- not enough to block blood flow, but enough to block digestion? It wasn't a "true" impaction case. Once he was woken up, he got right up and had very little trouble coming out of anesthesia. At least -- that's what I got from the conversation. But in over ten years of horse ownership, I've *knock on wood* only ever had this one colic. Looks like it's going to be 30 days of hand walking and then back into a regular program, provided there are no complications. What a giving horse! Now I won't feel guilty about not being able to ride. Ha! Seriously though, I am so happy he's going to be okay. His incision is only 10-12'', which I was told is on the smaller size for this surgery. He pooped TWICE while I was there this morning and relished in just a few minutes of being grazed outside. He should come home tomorrow. :) He was not happy to see me go -- and kept pushing the stall door open when I tried to leave. I bet his friends will be happy to have him back tomorrow. Thanks to everyone for the support!
  7. Well, surgery it was. Thankfully, it should be resolved now and if no complications arise - he'll be home as soon as Monday. It was determined once they got in that it was an issue that could not have been resolved without surgical intervention so I'm glad we did it sooner rather than later. I guess he just wanted a better reason for a month off than "mom had surgery and can't ride for 30 days". LOL Thanks for the jingles and well wishes.
  8. What a day. I had surgery yesterday and got a call around noon today that my big guy was colicing. Drove up there and hand walked him until the vet could come (all the time on my own pain meds). He was given IV fluids and tubed and oiled. All seemed well. Stayed out for a little while, once the sedative wore off, he started pacing and pawing again. Hauled him up to the clinic. Vet palpated, said his spleen is displaced and enlarged. Gave him meds, seemed to be working, left him for overnight observation. Just got a call asking if he's a candidate for surgery, apparently he's just not staying comfortable. Please say some prayers or send jingles over for Witt.
  9. Thanks for the encouragement, Heidi! Miss seeing you around! Hope everything is well in your neck of the woods! At this point, she's a lifer with me. I still have all of the same hesitations as before (no real use for her), but I won't send her away again. I rode her yesterday per the suggestion here -- I hadn't been on her since she has been back (she had been too thin); she was very anxious and "prancy", but seemed to remember all the old voice commands I had "installed" back when I had her and after several minutes of petting and reassuring she settled enough to walk around the arena a bit. <3 It'll be a work in progress, but I'm glad to see she's not a rearing/bucking complete mess. Thanks to everyone who shared their stories as well -- it's very reassuring that it can be done!
  10. I'm sorry CR. That would be tough. I've got a kids pony out on lease right now and I know the girl's parents have asked the trainer if I'd sell her -- it's one of those situations I'm wrangling with. I mean, people have sold horses to me and they end up living spoiled lives -- but I hear crappy stories and makes me want to not do it. I need to post an update, but I don't even know who all that I "know" is still around.
  11. Yeah, that's what my thought process was last night -- her top line could be built back up with some work, but I haven't even gotten on her to walk around since I got her back -- she was too skinny. Maybe I'll go get on her bareback today - see if she still remembers anything. Thanks, guys! It does feel better to just get it off my chest.
  12. I don't come around HC much anymore. I left a couple of years ago, after having been a member for almost a decade. Sorry I don't know most of the "regulars" now. I'm not even on the computer much as my life just got too busy. Anyway, I'm just frustrated and angry this morning about a somewhat recent event and most of the people I know who aren't horse related understand the outrage, but not how difficult it is to deal with. I rehomed one of my horses back several years ago. I don't buy or sell horses as a habit -- I've only ever let go of two - this one and one when I lost my job. "Sissy" is a mare that I never really used - she was just one out in my pasture that came from a home where she was used around the farm and never really loved on. I rode her on the trails occasionally, but she wasn't very fancy and didn't have any special training or skills. I was about to move and I didn't see any reason to board a horse that I didn't really use -- a man and his wife (the man was on the board of AQHA at one point, she still works for an equine breed association) wanted her to be a broodmare and trail horse at their place. Sounded like a great situation, had great references, etc -- so I gave her to them several years ago. Fast forward to last September. I get a call from the woman, who basically says she can't afford to feed her horses anymore (she is now divorced) and if I would like Sissy back I am welcome to come get her. I need another horse like I need a hole in my head, but I hitched up and went to get her about two hours away. I was in shock when I got there. Here it is four months later, and while we've done a lot, I don't know that she'll ever be quite the same beefy QH she was. She's 24 now, so it's harder to put weight back on. She lives two miles from my apartment in a pasture board situation with a giant round bale feeder that is never empty and has a mini and another retiree for company. They feed grain twice a day, I feed her a late dinner of some senior feed and amplify. She's happy, but I'm still just angry. And I'm frustrated that I can't tell if I need to be doing more for her health and feed wise and that I can't tell what her new "normal" is going to be. Everyone says she looks so much better, but I can tell she's still not "herself". She needs to see a chiropractor and dentist still. She got all her shots and a power pack when she arrived and she's since been dewormed every other month and her feet have been done. She was in such bad shape we didn't want to sedate her when she first got back. I feel like she still needs a solid 150 pounds at least. *sigh* I just wanted to vent. Why couldn't that woman have called me earlier? It makes me very leery to ever get rid of another horse. I read the other day that the owner of the other horse I had to rehome when I lost my job just filed for unemployment. Ugh.
  13. As far as jumping, I'm concerned mostly with schooling. In the actual classes, it's not so much of a big deal - but when you get 15 riders in an arena trying to jump 8 - 10 jumps in less than 30 minutes it gets hairy fast. I cannot have a horse that isn't controllable in that situation. Or an obliviot rider. Just last month I was at a show where people weren't calling jumps, we're paying attention, etc.. Horses that would be tearing down the lines so out of control you just knew that an accident was about to happen.
  14. At what point do you think a rider and horse are ready to show? When they can be controlled at any gait, have a solid stop, and are as prepared as possible for any obstacles they may face. I realize that not everyone has access to everything that will be encountered, but for example - IMO if there's a likelihood you'll see a roll top (jumping 2'6''+) then you should have something set up that either is or appears solid, even if it's a sheet pulled tautly between poles. (As long as it's *safely* mimicked.) I think that horses who need to be exposed to a show should first be introduced on the ground. IE - haul to a show and hang out and see everything once before expecting performance in a new place. How far will you let bad behavior go before you step in? As far as my horse, I'm not afraid to scratch if my horse isn't doing well in the warm up or starts being an idiot halfway through the division. I'm not about to reinforce bad behavior to win a ribbon. If my horse cannot do exactly as I ask, I pull and go school in a warm up ring. IE - when my mare refused a scary fence three times, we exited, went to the warm up and proceeded to school for twenty minutes over the scariest stuff available and then went back at the end of the day and jumped the box without complications. As far as other people, I've been known to yell quite forcefully at people when they're being obliviots. IE - when the girl walked her horse in front of my mare three strides out from a fence in the schooling and my response was something to the effect of watching where she's going or get on the rail. Or when people just randomly start jumping fences and don't bother to call anything. What do you think of people who come in totally unprepared? I certainly think less of them, I'll be honest. I think you can tell when someone is just having a bad day versus a horse that is in no way ready to be at a competition. For me, showing holds a certain level of prestige - you work very hard to be able to go in and do well, so to just show up and hope for the best is beyond me. I'm not saying I think people shouldn't show if they aren't perfect, but at least be prepared.
  15. Quick observation and question to put out there on the only horse related debate forum I know: It seems like lately I am seeing all sorts of people show up to our rated shows with horses who don't know how to quiet move down the line, let alone not rush fences, frame up, collect, extend, etc. Now, I don't know why this is - but my general opinion is that people and horses like this should not be at a show. If you have that many issues, you need to be at home working on them rather than putting other people in potential danger and making yourself look like a donkey's back side. I know not everyone is perfect and that horses do need to get out and get experience and that it's not always glitter and roses. But, lately I've seen in person - people getting jumped out of the tack, horses who have never seen rolltops or walls, horses tearing around the arena.. and online photos of horses evading the bit, strung out along the rail, etc. The last show I was competing in, I got ran into during our flat class because the girl behind me lost control of her horse and to stop him ran him into my mare! So, I guess my questions are: at what point do YOU think a rider and horse are ready to show? How far will you let bad behavior go before you step in? What do you think of people who come in totally unprepared? I'll answer my own question in the next post.