audrey-mae

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About audrey-mae

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  • Birthday 04/14/1982

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  • Gender
    Female
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    oregon
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    Natural barefoot trimming, animals, college, life
  1. Do you mean the heels are growing 1.5 inches above the sole? Because it really doesnt look that way in the photos. Each hoof is different. While this trim might be fine on another horse, to me, it looks like too much trimming. What happens when she grows out for 4 or so weeks? Does that improve her soundness at all?
  2. I think the biggest problem I see is that you are over trimming her. Let her have some hoof under her. Since you are taking her down to the sole, you are taking her down too far on the outside. Overall though, the trim is good, its just too extreme.
  3. There was another link in the OP that stated that someone who has rescued a lot of horses is now in need of rescue herself, or something along those lines. That link has since been removed it seems. Those are all old photos as well, says so in the thread, so no, I don't know that is what the horses look like right now. I certainly hope it is though.
  4. Oh no, again?! And I see 2 yos and babies on the list, but those are your personal arabian horses, not rescue horses. Not fair to be trying to pull at the heart strings under the guise of a rescue, when they are your home bred horses either. I mean after everything we have heard for years, about how hard things are for you, you have no help, you have no income, why have you still been breeding horses?
  5. My heart goes out to Jack and family. From going through this myself, 2 years ago, I know all to well the gloom that hangs over their farm these days. Sarah, I know from when my stepdad was on his death bed, and people who werent our dearest friends, and family wanted to visit, they were not welcomed. Its just too much of a weird time to have new people intrude. It was stressful to have them ask even, because its hard to say "No" when things are all so weird and bad already. The thought is kind, but really its not the time for strangers to come into the picture.
  6. So many prayers, and much love for you CR!!
  7. Glad to hear this isn't a normal type of trim you would do. Good luck in your trim endeavors!
  8. I am sorry, but I think those feet in general are severely over trimmed. Do you know how the mare is walking? I would bet she's short striding at the least, and flat out lame on any sort of gravel. Its most especially important to not leave the horses walking on their soles like that, and especially when you start out with such an over grown hoof, its good to leave them with some protection. Those last photos you put up are especially over trimmed. Give them 6 weeks before you touch them again, and next time, remember, always leave at the LEAST a hair of wall above the sole. You want to be able to feel the ridge of the wall from the sole.
  9. Be careful about letting him eat, its best to let things get sorted out before giving them food again, plenty of fresh water is great, but just be careful on the hay, it will just add to any problems he may be having. Prayers that he pulls through!
  10. I know I am about to become hated here, but with as much of as a beginner as you are, a horse with a bridling issue is NOT the horse for you. I know you are excited and hopeful because shes free, but you have to be realistic. What will happen in a couple weeks when you can no longer get the bridle on her at all, because you are to inexperienced to get a horse over an issue like this? Little issues do NOT just get better with inexperienced handlers, they get worse at an exponential rate. I know how the want of a new horse can cloud judgement, so I just wanted to make sure you really thought about trying to deal with a horse with an issue that can and will get out of control in an instant. All it will take is one bad bridling session between you and her, and that will be it, your new free horse will be a pasture pet because you wont be able to bridle her.
  11. So people show babies that arent weaned in halter, and the mares wait outside the arena. Is that abusive? Its stressful on babies to go to their first show, its scary, they are in a new place, their mamas are outside of the arena waiting for them. OMG SO ABUSIVE!!! Tell me, what part of this is abuse that will leave some sort of lasting traumatic affects on these babies? Are you afraid they will they be terrified of running to their dams now or something? Or what? When my first colt was 3 weeks old I loaded him and his mama up into a trailer to take them back to the breeders. The colt was scared. OMG SO ABUSIVE!!! How is it abusive to have some halter broke babies run a couple hundred feet to their patiently waiting dams? Some of you people need to get a grip and think through your knee jerk reactions. If you think this is abuse, CLEARLY you have never witnessed REAL abuse. ETA I saw someone here say that no one has offered to take their foals to this rodeo. Honestly I would have, and EITHER of my babies would have blown the doors off any of those other foals. We would have smoked the competition
  12. Keeping him stalled is WRONG! The movement will be crucial to increasing his appetite, and helping his feet. I have rehabbed many rescues and unless hes a freak who paces the fence, keeping him stalled will actually hinder his improvement. I know you are working with a rescue, and I am sure they have rehabbed more rescues then me, but their logic is a bit off. Thats a great start on his feet :)
  13. I dont see anything 'clubby' about that hoof, just way too long of a toe. Does your farrier par out his hoof?
  14. Despite how over grown and neglected these feet are, I can tell the horse has a a great hoof under all that mess, just DYING to come out. I know its impossible to tell from the photos, but I dont see anything that looks like wld to me. The whole sole is basically one giant scab at this point. Just trim this hoof like you would any hoof. I would take the heels down to just above the sole. To start on the toe, follow the lines where the hoof has already started to break off on its own. As you get the flare off little by little you will see the hoof take shape and you wont be so lost. That false sole/scab will likely start coming out in giant chunks after a couple trims, dont rush it though. Dont expect this horses feet to be normal after 4 or 5 trims either, so dont get discouraged in a few months when his feet are still wonky. Just go slow and take your time with the trimming, it will slowly take shape for you.
  15. I grew up on morgans, that horse doesnt have a drop of morgan in it, I assure you that. I also own a saddlebred now, he also does NOT look to have any saddlebred in him either. He looks like your typical grade horse. Hes got really poor conformation, looks like someone built him out of 5 mismatching horse parts LOL. I am sure hes a nice horse to be around, he doesnt look like hed be very comfortable to ride with that super straight shoulder, his long back, and being built completely downhill, all that together with that super long neck and giant head, any sort of collection will be nearly impossible for him. Also, that right hind foot looks like a club foot. I really hope hes a gelding, because this horse does NOT have any physical attributes that need to be passed on, his genetics should stop there.