WildaPony

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About WildaPony

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  1. What about an amount based off a price point. So if you say have a smaller job you only give them a small finders fee, say a $25 finders fee. A larger job $50 and a significantly larger job $75. Base the amount off of how much profit you make. I don't honestly know how much a small job would profit you, but make it so that its not a stretch for you to give them this gift from any job that you do. A percentage at some point could earn them quite a significant amount of your profits and while they did send the work your way, your the one would actually completed the job. If you do the same in return on a regular basis for them and send them work were applicable you are already giving them profit in a sense too, so no need to give away all your hard earned money. Just a small amount to say thanks is enough in my opinion.
  2. I'm sorry everything is happening for you all at once. My defects weren't truly major either, in my opinion. I've met people with worse. Nothing I deal with day in and day out or anything. Just had some fun surgery as a kid. I honestly forget most of the time that I am a heart patient, because I sure don't feel like one. I'm glad you have a good friend with some first hand experience that you can lean on for support. I'm sure she can attest to the truly outstanding transformation in technology and information out there that will help. On a side note for you, I think it's best not to get to alarmed by your doctors reaction. I have had doctors freak out when they listen to my heart even now. Every time a doctor would freak out about something I would go see my cardiologist and he would look at my awkward heart rhythm and just go "yup that's you". Only when he worried did I worry. I think it's lack of specialization for most and not being use to to seeing the unusual that makes a regular physician worry. It's also their job to pick those things out and be worried that they exist. Just try to stay calm until a pediatric cardiologist says you should get too worried. I know easy to say, hard to do. Sending you lots of good wishes that everything in your life works itself out soon!
  3. First and foremost you did nothing wrong... Please always remember that. Most heart defects are genetic. And a lot are also easily treated. Don't get too upset yet, minor things can also throw off a heart rate and I hope that's all it is and that your little girl is only giving you your first grey hair. I was born with heart defects myself, went through open heart surgery twice and multiple other small procedures. I have artificial pieces in there and I still gallop my horse on a regular basis. They have come a very long way in medical technology since I was born. When I went to my annual appointment only last year, there were a lot of doctors mulling around in the hallway and going in and out of one exam room. One of the doctors stopped in to say hello, she had been away from that hospital for some time, but had been there when I was rushed to that hospital after turning blue and during my first initial surgery. She told us they were all over there ooo-ing and aaahh-ing at the new fetal echo machine. She said it was amazing. The quality of it was so superior to previous ones and that they could see in absolute detail what was wrong. They could see every chamber of the heart in detail and so on. To my mother, who was told I was fine during her fetal echo when she was pregnant with me and to me who has worried about when I want to have children, this was an amazing feat. I kid you not to see doctors that excited over a machine made me smile, because it means good news for mothers like yourself and people like me who know they carry those genes and still want to have kids some day. I hope all you get is good news at your appointment.
  4. I had thought I had heard you could use Maalox, but wasn't sure I was remembering correctly and wouldn't know how much to feed anyways, so thanks Oz. Bell- We had a horse a while back that was a high strung thoroughbred that was on lay-up and kept in a stall for what felt like forever to me. They had her on aloe vera juice I think more to prevent ulcers than anything. But had completely forgotten about that. I'm thinking I may do both. But first he needs his teeth done. Felt them, just barely, and he has some very sharp points. They have probably never been done. So that will definitely help as well with the weight issue. Thanks.
  5. My barn has just rescued a OTTB that has been at the barn for only a short time. Perhaps a month or so. When he first arrived at our barn he was a bit ribby and slim. He is only 6 and still filling out, but we were told that he was a little thin from being pushed from the hay pile by the bigger draft crosses he was being kept with. It wasn't anything alarming, just needed a few more groceries that he could actually get to be able to fill in... or so we thought. My barn is notorious for fat horses, not just fat ponies, because of our luscious grass that the horses have access to 24/7. And because we grow our own hay and have an over-abundance for the amount of horses we have on the property, so they can have what they need without worry. Well after being with us a month now he has not gained an ounce. I almost want to say he's lost weight, but if he has it isn't much. He gets a huge field of grass with only one other horse, two bales of hay a day, and grain. We have also noticed that he cribs, very rarely, but he does it. The barn where he came from swears they never saw him crib. Which I believe because they would have no reason to lie and the horse really does it so infrequently I wouldn't have noticed except he did it right in front of me. At some point a lightbulb went off in my head and I thought perhaps the poor guy has ulcers. But I have never dealt with ulcers before and need help. Its a bit of a story, but he is literally a whole barn rescue, so we are trying to keep costs to a minimum as no one individual has a lot of money to donate. So scoping him really isn't an option just to see. However, a supplement is something I could swing to see if it will help him. But I have not a clue where to begin. I don't know what supplements are good, how much to feed and for how long. Anyone able to help me? Any and all information is appreciated. Thanks.
  6. Why won't Dover simply give you a refund? They have a 100% satisfaction guarantee don't they? It's right on their return policy on their website. They may only be able to send you a new set at this point, but they should do something for you. If they won't I'd definitely go to the manufacture. Not fair at all you spent a lot of money on them I'm sure and they should hold up for a lot more than 2 rides. I'd be pretty upset. It's obviously a defective part on the boots and not something you did. I work in retail. I return anything unless it's completely used up. Then I have to send them to the manufacture.
  7. I'm not over weight, but gain fat while not doing as much during the winter months. I've also had some stomach issues and just simply haven't felt well for years, so since the doctors seem to think I'm fine I finally decided to try and eat better. The problem being I LOVE chocolate. But I thankfully like good quality dark chocolate too, so I've made my own healthy(ish) snack of the 60% cocoa Ghirardelli dark chocolate chips and shelled walnuts. I put a small amount of each in a cup and snack on that. Both are actually very healthy for you in small amounts so I don't feel guilty and it curbs my need for chocolate since it tastes almost like a candy bar. My local health food store also has some really good chocolate trail mixes that are very good and don't have all the added fats and extras like a candy bar. I also snack on dried fruit for sweets, figs for some reason are my thing right now.
  8. But that's sadly part of the mental. I work in retail I see children the age of 40 everyday and some days they call me stupid simply because they don't understand what I'm intelligently saying. I work with 12 year olds in 35 year old bodies and like you get paid to be yelled at many times a day. Such is life some days sad to say. But I get to go home and relax every night. So I know I'm not in the same boat. Unfortunately though you'll find even out of the military, immaturity never out grows the general public. People sadly don't mature at the same rate they age and for many they never do, grow up mentally that is. Try to remember also everyone else too probably feels the way you do everyday, about to snap. And a lot of the people that are older are likely doing it more for the money during this crappy economy than for the reasons you are. My dad still remembers some of the idiots to this day, and my brother called more people Donkey's than he said nice things about them. He's got some good stories. Spent an almost 24 hour period moving every inch of furniture out of his barracks in Korea and cleaning it top to bottom for some idiots inability to fess up to something stupid. He didn't sleep for 2 days after just arriving there. I think what saved him though through the whole experience was his sarcasm. He always said if its the hard way or just plain stupid way, that's how its done in the Army. The less sense it makes the more they do it; if it doesn't work the Army probably built it... and so on. I don't think he'd have done anything differently and not joined. It's afforded him so much now that hes out and given him life experience he wouldn't have otherwise had. It becomes I think a love hate relationship, that once you've been through it and survived no one can take that away from you. You just have to survive. Try not to be so hard on yourself or them. It's stressful for everyone. I use my idiots at work for what I consider free entertainment. And it gets me through the day. My store would make a great sitcom some days I swear. If it really isn't for you though and that's what you decide, just remember its not failing it just wasn't the right choice for you. Better to know than to always regret not trying. I Hope things improve for you though very soon.
  9. I don't really have any advice on how to handle the situation your in, because I'm not entirely sure whats available to you in the Army. But I'll tell you what my Vietnam Vet. father told my brother as he went into basic. "It's not about the physical challenge its about the mental..." I think that's the best advice my brother was given and he somehow managed to stay sane through the military he signed up for and his deployment in Afghanistan after being recalled. It sounds like crappy advice, but don't let them get to you. You're better than that. Leave them to their childish ways and just focus on yourself. What they do has no bearing on you unless you let it. Go vent and cry to a counselor, regain your composure and remember its all a mental game. Not just the crap your Sergeants put you through, but everything you deal with from being away from family and friends to having to mesh with people you don't know, half the time don't like, and don't necessarily have anything in common with. It's incredibly hard, I'm not trying to to make what your feeling seem insignificant at all, I'm sure you're at your wits end, and in need of different scenery and people at the moment, but if this is what you want let them roll off your back as best you can and try to focus on whats really important.
  10. I watched all of the videos twice. And while I feel like the second to last one there is improvement in attitude, his hindend, and his walking ability. I think the last one hes just so off balance and simply trying to catch himself when he goes for a little "jog". Hopefully he will get relief soon either way. The thing that strikes me though, is not the horses discomfort so much as his ability to adapt and the body to mend. I've never seen a truly degloved hoof before and am finding it amazing at the amount of hoof growth that has come back. And while so many people talked about his hindend being so off and his crippled movement, I noticed there was a moment when walking in the aisle after I think a shoe was put on that the injured foot began to slip as he put it down and he thought about it and calmly repositioned and kept going. She kept saying he is a smart horse. He is. He has the self preservation enough to keep going. I'm not saying I agree with keeping him going, I don't think I could do that to my horse of a lifetime. But I think sometimes its these sad mistakes that people make for themselves that help us further our ability to help in the future and to further their ability to see the light the next time. If they never tried to save the Ruffians of the world, we likely wouldn't have the wake-up pool to help make trying to save the next safer. I've known one too many people who have gone too far to save and realized it was in vain and the next time have made a more sensible choice despite the difficulty. Lessons are always learned the hard way sadly... and sometimes it takes never being able to forgive yourself to never do it again...
  11. Warm salt water helps and would be good if that's all you can get your hands on for the moment. But taking lysine does wonders sometimes stops them before they get further than a red dot. And my aunt gave me at one point tea tree oil toothpaste. Tea tree oil is a natural antiseptic and putting the real stuff in your mouth is way too disgusting, but the toothpaste if you can find it in a natural food store or food section helps really well too. I use to just stick a glob on the spot where it was and then rinse a little while later.
  12. There is honestly little you can do that you aren't doing, other than to make sure you are killing all those eggs, because they will outnumber you and kill your plants totally far to fast. I've found quite a few dead older squash bugs so my hope is that in illiminating the babies eventually I won't have such a problem. I sadly didn't know last year until it was too late what was wrong with my squash and what they were. I found that the only thing that kills them is dish soap. If you're desperate you can spray groups of babies just born with a strong dish water and they will drop dead right before your eyes. So will the adults if its more fun than squishing them. just remember that the dish soap burns the leaves so you can't just spray the whole plant it will die even faster. I have found that they aren't in every garden, strangely enough, but once in there they make themselves at home and refuse to leave. Plus they do overwinter and especially like coming right in the house. Last year I had so many before I knew what they were and how to deal with them that it honestly gave me goosebumps to walk through my garden because they were everywhere. I've taken to cutting the eggs off the leaves by taking part of the leaf with it even if it means some of the leaves die so that I don't accidentally scrap the eggs right onto the ground. And I've been keeping a coffee can full of dish soap water to put them in so they can't hatch, it seems to be helping. I find hundreds more every two days and go through and cut eggs off and add to the bug egg soup, but I have already had more zucchini this year than I did all last year.
  13. Not trying to minimize your pain or worry at all Ann, but I have a stint and have been through around 8 ( I lost count) cardio-cath's. It's not the worst procedure, I promise. Very minimally invasive and a quick recovery. I hope that they find that's all they need to do for you or less and that you get back to being healthy quickly. If you'd like more information from a personal perspective please feel free to ask, I'd be glad to share.
  14. I don't have kids, but can clearly remember being forced to finish what was on my plate as a kid, not necessarily to have a treat after, but usually because I was a light eater and my father would put too much on my plate. Could you try simply saying "Lily if you're still hungry keep eating your (insert whats for dinner)." If she finishes a normal amount of food for her then offer her the cupcake or whatever it is. Leave out the bit about her finishing to get the treat so that she isn't forcing it down like you said but simply deciding for herself if shes still hungry. You might also try asking her which part of dinner is her favorite, be it a vegetable or the main dish and ask her to eat a certain number more bites and then she can have a small treat. I noticed a lot that people would make their kids eat things that they didn't truly like in order to get the treat and part of the problem in not eating was simply they disliked the food not that it wasn't a cupcake. Letting her choose a healthy part of dinner to finish or eat more of would get more good nutrients in her without making her eat the whole plate and give her the option to choose what it is so she isn't forcing it down simply for the treat. I do think finishing a plate when it isn't necessarily going to happen is unfair and teaches even worse eating habits in kids. But making her eat healthier food to earn a small treat isn't a terrible way to teach her at that age that the good food is what your suppose to eat most of. Then if shes hungry later you can offer her more good food like your husband suggested but with no addition of a treat.