mstevegrrl

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About mstevegrrl

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  • Location
    Wa
  • Interests
    Horses, Barefoot Trimming, PNH training
  1. A little update, not a good one. I guess my gelding is one of the unfortunate few that suffers from both Onchocerca and sweet itch. After double dosing 3 times every 2 weeks, and a single tube every 2 weeks, he currently has no hair on his dock, no hair on his face, and a nasty mess of raw belly/sheath. I'm contemplating having him put down. This is the worst year he has had yet. He is still a happy boy, kind and friendly, but I don't know how fair it is to him when he is so itchy/in pain. He was doing really well till gnat season set in, this is just killing me he is doing so badly now. I'm happy for the horses that have been helped though.
  2. Wow, thanks for the kind words spotted. If you read the prior posts you'd see that I NOW understand he is uneducated when it comes to the bit. And the trainers came highly recommended, I did research them, talked to people she'd trained for, the person that "trained" her... I just made the mistake of not being there every time she worked him, and some things I found out later. The other gal also had a large training operation, and was also highly recommended. When I fired the one , she told me "well, i'm not an Arab trainer" What a load of horse poo. Its you are a horse trainer, you are a horse trainer. The not understanding comment that you got so worked up about, was referring to the post that Willy made about my horse being disrespectful and pushy, because he isn't. I had no issue with smilie, I agreed with what she had to say. I just came here asking my (apparently stupid) question because all the years I've been around horses, I've heard about desensitizing to the saddle, I know how to teach a horse to move forwards, move sideways, help reduce spooky ness, and all manner of groundwork, I just don't ever recall anyone talking about teaching a horse to accept the bit. I'm a little confused why you got so worked up over that.... In the scope of training a horse, all the things I could not know, I think that its relatively minor.
  3. I guess you didn't really read or understand my post, Willy. He moves away from pressure, he is easy to handle, he is respectful on the ground. Under saddle he is kind, tries his heart out, just doesn't understand the bit thing. I've seen him blow twice: a "trainer" I hired when I was first trying to train him tied his head around short to the saddle. He is blind to the side she tied him on, and he was not bending very well. He got so worked up he ended up rearing over a fence. (a shame because it only took me a short while to teach him how to properly bend, without making him feel like he was trapped) The other time he "blew" was another so called "trainer" saddled him with a saddle I later discovered was too small, climbed on his back and instantly started kicking. Even before she started kicking it was obvious he was uncomfortable and unsure (head in the air, eyes wide, breathing heavy, super tense stance) he bucked a couple of times, off she came. (this gal also backed him into barbwire and called him a jerk when he jumped forward on her. She didn't stay long) I guess I don't consider any of that his being disrespectful, spoiled or mean, just the victim of some poor "trainers". Even when he "blew" it wasn't him trying to hurt anyone. His normal demeanor is laid back, quiet, very friendly, and eager to please. I guess if those incidents make him pushy, spoiled, or any of the other things... I don't really know what to think! I've owned many horses in the past 12 years, I've had some great horses, and he is in the top two for his awesome attitude :)
  4. I owned an anchor hill mare a handful of years ago, which this horse has a few generations back. If I remember right, they are mostly Egyptian. Anchor Hill farm put out some pretty impressive stock, in my opinion :) I haven't found that they were well known though. That mare is probably the best horse I've ever owned. Got any pictures? :)
  5. Huh? He isn't pushy or disrespectful. I'm not sure how you got that from my post...he just hasn't been taught how to accept a bit. We've done Parelli in the past and that is how we taught him to move off pressure under saddle.
  6. See, that's what I was trying to figure out Smilie. Granted, this is the first horse I've trained, but I've got friends who have trained horses, I hired someone to help me train this one, and I guess everyone just kinda glossed over the bit part. I wasn't sure if accepting a bit was something that just happened, something you had to ease them into with a certain bit, or if it was a matter of conditioning. I think my answer is pretty clear now :) glad to know he will shut his mouth eventually, I just gotta take the time lol.
  7. Thanks skippitb. He is a good boy, and it didn't usually take much to get him to accept things, or to teach him new stuff. It is just that he was trained so long ago that I can't remember how he was about the bit and he really wasn't ridden long enough to be considered "broke". I've never thought I babied him. I don't treat him differently despite his handicap (half blind) and of course i've had instances where I've had to push him to do things he didn't really want to . I do treat him like an intelligent animal that needs to understand things before I ask for more from him though. If I do something that scares him and causes him to come unhinged just because I can't be bothered to take the time it takes, then I am not the right owner for this horse.
  8. No BeRandee, I don't think its really a case of that. I hired a trainer that climbed on him, and instead of waiting til he was comfortable having someone on his back, she started kicking him to get him to go. The second person I hired decided that he wasn't flexing as well (on his blind side) so she tired his head around. No, I don't really think he had had unreasonable reactions. I would rather teach him to accept something so he knows how to deal with it, than force it on him and hope for the best. Kitten, that was sorta what I was thinking. He isn't stalled, but no reason why he can't wear it while being lunged. Thanks!
  9. My gelding is 15, trained under saddle around 8, started him in a rope halter, and then I recall putting him in a snaffle. If I remember right, I tried a loose ring, which he absolutely hated (lol don't blame him) and then a fixed ring D, single joined snaffle. I remember he always fussed with it, mouth open and it looked like he was trying to get his tongue over the bit. I haven't ridden him in almost 5 years now, and I rode him Sunday. He was good, except the mouth thing was extreme and he was so distracted by the bit he had a hard time listening. This time I was using a double jointed (french link) full cheek snaffle. The bit is adjusted fine, he's had his teeth checked. I will not crank a noseband on him, because he is a horse that will blow if you force him to do things, and besides that... I would rather teach him to understand. What I'm wondering is, it there a bit out there that I should try that he might be comfortable with, should I just continue bitting him up and hope he gets used to it, or should I do away with the bit idea entirely and go to a sidepull or bitless bridle? I was looking through some old pics of me riding him (with a bit), and his mouth was open in all of them... lol
  10. I've always had good luck with weatherbeeta sheets. My gelding is a very itchy horse and is pastured with lots of trees to boot, and they have always held up well for me. I generally buy the ones with belly bands and neck covers, probably my favorite feature is the super wide tail flap. They seem to have the best bang for their buck. This year he is wearing an amigo flybuster though, and I'm liking it too :) It's much softer than I'm used to having for fly sheets, but it it's holding up very well.
  11. Both of my western cinches are 32". My gelding is not so big around (Polish Arab, not the roundy Crabbet types) lol I was really hoping I was done buying tack this year. Cross my fingers till I can get out and try it on him I guess...
  12. That was my first instinct KatyB. But then I was hearing about lots of people using thick wool pads with their treeless saddles so I wasn't really sure. I might try it out for a couple of short rides (I'm not a heavy person, and I used to be a decent rider lol), but I think I'm gonna buy a HafSaddle Pad. They seem to have good reviews from what I've read. I'm not even positive I have a western girth that will fit this horse I don't know that I've personally put a Western saddle on him lol.
  13. Thanks :) I sure appreciate the advice and support here!
  14. Yes, I feed about 2 1/2 cups of flax a day, and he is on several acres of pasture. A lot of the grass is about knee high. Unfortunately, it is very wet right now, and that is definitely not helping things. (As the other 2 pastures are bordering on overgrazed, I don't have any other option right now) I don't have the option to stall him either. He is wearing a Bug Buster fly sheet with a belly band, and I line his underside with SWAT around 5 in the afternoon to help deter the little bugs that come out. Really, where he is right now is NOT the ideal turnout area for him, I just don't have anywhere else to put him. I'm hoping the other pastures will recover quickly, as they aren't as wet and buggy. 99% of his diet comes from the pasture, I feed a couple pounds of oats to carry his flax.
  15. He doesn't have itchy watery eyes or runny nose, actually. He just rubs his face against his legs, it appears he has a pretty heavy infestation around his eyes. His eye looks a little weird in the pic cause it is blue-ish. He is blind in that eye, he poked himself with a stick before I got him. In hindsight, I wonder if he was trying to itch himself cause of this Onchocerca itchies. I put calm coat on him which contains lavender, tea tree, and eucalyptus oils, and that helps externally soothe the itchies.