Little Mac Lover

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About Little Mac Lover

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    GenuineEquine211
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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Missouri
  • Interests
    I'll give you one guess. . . .
  1. I also have narrow feet and high arches. After lots of frustration with my Ariats dying rather quickly, I bought a pair of lace-up Tredsteps, and I absolutely love them. They came with two different foot bed inserts, and the laces allow for extra adjustment. I have had them for a little over a year now, and they have barely any wear (riding at least one horse a day, usually two) and still fit wonderfully. Mine are 'Sporthorses', which I don't think Tredstep makes anymore, but the new models are definitely worth looking into.
  2. After my last pair of Ariats barely lasted a year (both zippers blew and holes abounded), I decided that I needed to try another brand. I recently got lace-up Tredstep Sporthorse boots from Tack of the Day, and they are wonderful so far. The leather was so soft that they felt great even before breaking in, and they came with two different sets of insoles. I have super high arches, so the extra arch support was very welcome. I don't particularly like the time it takes to lace them up, but avoiding zipper problems is worth it.
  3. I know several people with the Supremes, and all of them love them. They are very nice quality and seem to hold up well. I tried on a friend's pair and the slim calf was too loose for me, so keep that in mind if you have a smaller calf.
  4. Haha, I remember those folders, too! I would check just to see which topics were 'on fire'. They were inevitably some of the more . . . exciting threads, but that made them great reads! I've been checking out some of the other forums also (and learning a lot) but it is definitely getting a little slow around here.
  5. Aw, he's cute. Good job! I also love the breeches, which I never thought I'd say about a pair of red pants. They look really comfortable, even from the photos.
  6. Thanks for letting me know. They should work now =).
  7. This is Dublin, the horse I'm leasing from my school for the summer. We both go back on Monday, and I will definitely miss having the little guy all to myself. He has been incredibly good pretty much the whole time he has been here and is just a good egg overall. A few weeks ago he had a bit of a foot issue, but it has since been cleared up, and we have been getting back into the swing of things. I have a couple videos from a ride last weekend, if you wouldn't mind critiquing. I know many of my issues (I need to lift my hands, control the flailing ankles, be more mindful of my body over fences, etc, etc.), but it's always good to hear about the things I miss. Also, I need to get him a little more forward at points in the trot portions of these particular videos, and our transitions still get messy if I'm not riding (imagine that). I'm my own worst critic, so knowing if I'm actually doing even one thing right would be awesome as well. We (read: I) were doing really well over fences earlier last week (and have been all summer), then I had some sort of mental problem and decided that picking to every fence was a grand idea. I managed to pull my head out of my butt and salvage the two rides in which I did that wonderful behavior, but needless to say I was not very pleased with myself. He had habit at school of adding strides of his own accord and occasionally trying to leave from almost under the jumps, which he has not done at all this summer, so he certainly doesn't need me telling him to do so. At any rate, I'm trying not to dwell and to keep everything positive for both of us over fences, but I definitely need to find a happy medium between pick, pick, picking, and jumping up his neck. As you can see, I was apparently too preoccupied with whatever mental weirdness was happening to ask him consistently to land on the correct lead [Duh] . A little trotting: Trot & Canter (where he counter canters, I'm asking for it): Just two little jumps: A couple short 'courses': And a quick picture because he's adorable: Thank you for looking! Edited to remove the little slashes that appeared by the apostrophes.
  8. Nice trailer! The mats look really sharp, although it sounds like they were a royal pain to cut to fit. Illia and Indy look great. I can't believe how big Indy is getting! It seems like just yesterday that you were posting about Illia being pregnant.
  9. She's adorable and certainly seems to enjoy jumping! I love ponies, and looking at pony pictures just makes me want to ride one again. I'm on the verge of being a little tall (only 5'6"), but I'm mostly torso so it doesn't look too strange.
  10. She's adorable! She reminds me a lot of 'my' Derby personality-wise and in the ability to inspire instant, ridiculous affection. You look good together . I'm all for slightly less sweltering weather, too; around 70 would be perfect.
  11. Good to see an update from you, too! Oliver is looking lovely! I really enjoyed the book, and the visuals within it are great. Not much about jumping is covered, but what is mentioned I definitely agree with.
  12. Thank you for the input, you two. That has always seemed the logical thing to me--- letting the horse's motion move them--- but I've encountered numerous opinions and was just curious as to what all of you had been taught. I think he's pretty cute, too!
  13. Adorable!
  14. Thanks! He's a good egg. Sorry about the confusion. I meant the ankle, not the heel. My heels are generally okay at the sitting trot (not that you can necessarily tell that from this collection of photos), but my ankles are the confusing part. They're quite flexible and tend to move around a lot (sort of side to side) when I sit the trot, even without stirrups, while the rest of my leg stays relatively still. I CAN hold them still if I focus on them, but it feels stiff and forced and makes the rest of my leg tense. Plus, the opinions seem to vary on what exactly those silly ankles should really be doing. I apologize if I was confusing, and thank you for the reply!
  15. I have been lurking for quite a while, and figured I might as well post a few pictures since things appear to be picking up around here once more. I'm leasing a horse from my school for the summer, and it has been a great experience so far. Dublin is a good little guy, and we get along well together. During the three weeks between the end of the semester and when I picked him up, he suddenly developed a much more balanced canter. He spent most of that time standing in a pasture (he was ridden a few times right before I came to retrieve him), but I'm not going to question good developments. Since bringing him home, I have mostly been working on keeping and improving that new balance, keeping him going forward and relaxed, and listening more consistently on the approach to fences. He has been doing awesome, and most of the few little issues we've had were due to a lack of bodily awareness on my part. In fact, prior to his first ride here I had to switch out both the bit (a twisted full cheek) and the noseband (a figure eight) that he goes in at school because of a cut on his face. He was a little strong at first, but his face is now healed and he is still going happily in a copper eggbutt and plain noseband. We just need to keep moving in this good direction, polish our transitions, and get to more serious work on lead changes. He was starting to get an occasional change at the end of the school year; it just isn't something I have focused a lot on recently. I also need to work more on myself, but that's not really anything new. I did pick up a copy of Centered Riding, and I must say that I like it a lot so far (I started it Sunday). Even though he has been going well, focusing on some of the things Sally Swift talks about definitely resulted in positive changes on both of our parts. She makes a lot of sense, and I am excited about the rest of the book. Derby is doing well, too. He is still not 100% sound, and unfortunately I don't have the ability to do anything in that regard. I haven't been out to see him nearly as much as I should, between taking six hours of classes a day and riding most evenings. I sort of feel as though I am abandoning him and his owners, but I can only do so much. He is adorably happy to see me when I do visit, though. I love that old guy to a ridiculous degree. If I remember my camera the next time I go see him, I'll post some recent pictures of his scruffy self. Here are a few pictures of Dube. My saddle was apparently, for reasons unknown, a smidge too far forward on the day in which the purple-shirt photos were taken. That has since been remedied. Unless you feel that I am going to damage myself or innocent bystanders, I am not really too interested in a critique. I know for the most part what I do badly (those lovely hands, etc.) and I try to constantly work on those things (although obviously not constantly enough). I do have a question, prompted both by my current reading material and the variability of past experiences. What happens to your ankles (as in you personally) when you sit the trot? What is the 'ideal ankle' that you strive for in that situation? I know that sounds goofy, but I'm just curious. Anyway, pictures: I'll just mention my hands this once, because otherwise my captions will get repetitive. One of us looks nice, though! It helps if you stare at the head . . . Stretching . . . in spite of my contortions Lifting one's heel up is also the proper way the ride without stirrups (heh) Thank you for looking! Please let my know if the first few don't work--- I've never tried to post photos from facebook before.