ravantwin

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About ravantwin

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  1. Check out this cool horse, Jak, playing with his human, Sharon...
  2. Check out this cool horse, Jak, playing with his human, Sharon...
  3. Check out this winter video of horse fun, my husband came up to the barn to see, "why do you go up there and what do you do when it's this snowy and cold?" LOL! Lucky he brought a camera! Sharon and Jak
  4. Winter time fun with an amazing horse!

    Jak and Sharon in the snowsharon and jak in the snow
  5. I prefer rope myself. My horse is rather "dull" meaning it takes him 3 or 4 seconds to respond... to any command. Must be a long loop back to the brain. That loop is just a little faster with the rope halter. My trainer doesn't like em though so when he's working with me, I put the nylon one on. I have one that has the loose ring on the bottom which is nice for lunging cuz the ring slides lateral rather than pulling the halter around the face of the horse; gives better lateral correction against "pullers". I want a leather one, but can't bring myself to do it. I believe that if a horse lays back and "breaks away" even once... they know they can. It becomes dangerous in itself as they always have that possibility in the back of their mind. I prefer to carry a pocket knife in the event of a situation, but having a horse bust loose is never optimal.
  6. Chuck norris is so cool... when he does push ups, he doesn't move up, the earth moves down...
  7. So much fun to see everyones pretty ponies! This is me in 1970, my twin sister and I were ten years old training our first horse, Holly, tricks (note barefeet, boots in the background, lordy!) There's Jak and I winning our class, I remembered my boots this time... Wow, I'm still crazy about horses, still having fun!
  8. Hey paint pony. Those chaps are too big for you around your teensy legs. I just recently had a pair of custom chaps made for showing here in the northwest. They cost me around $300 before tax. The nice thing was I chose a scalloped edge instead of fringe (less movement for practical western appearances and doesn't get caught up in your zipper) and though the chaps fit well and the horse showed well, it wasn't a GREAT fit and the pony is now going to regionals and nationals... with this in mind, the folks who made them offered (I took them in to have them sized a bit) to totally redo them at no charge. They were a little short, a little big around the thighs, and the zipper was a bit short as well. If you are having a pair of custom chaps made, they should fit snug... they will stretch out a bit as you wear them. They should measure you VERY carefully wearing the boots you will be competing in. Also, keep in mind, the end product represents THEM (that is probably why this outfit offered a total redo out of the blue). Anyway, if you are showing seriously, i think its worth it, otherwise probably money best spent at your favorite charity... or christmas present if you got REALLY good grades, ha ha! :)
  9. You know, that's a curious question. I actually just had to leave my barn because of the drama. The BO felt peculiarly threatened by my presence, it was apparent to me in her body language, critical comments, angry outbursts and general demeanor towards other owners if they engaged me at any level. The funny thing was... I'm no threat... I'm not competitive, just want to mess with my horse, laugh a lot, get silly with the kids, and in general have sufferred tremendous personal loss to the point that my time with my horse is strictly a time to relax, enjoy and sometimes cry if noone else is around. I've grown up with horses, showed western riding/pleasure, gaming, then received training in english equitation and jumping at the college level. I've had an enormous opportunity to work with many trainers/breeds throughout the unitied states. I currently have a 3 yr old that I've trained myself with excellent results. He does great on the trail and in shows and is safe and trustworthy. I will teach my granddaughter to ride on him when she is old enouth. However, I totally understand that there are many styles of training a horse, much to be gained from all disciplines, and I happily incorporate many methods to find what works best for me. I've helped a few of the kids at the barn overcome a few issues with their ponies, and these kids have endeared themselves to me with their success and graciousness (as have their parents). I can only surmise that the BO was incredibly insecure. I still don't quite get it but, hey, I didn't break it... don't have the energy to try and fix it. I need peace in my heart, so... i finally left, landed in another closeby stables where the people seem genuine and friendly, sit around and gab horses (some of them make thousands of dollars a year competing, some of them can only yet walk/trot) and there are no obvious insinuations of superiority or insecurity. We encourage each other, share a soda, (or a beer if it's late evening adults) and enjoy the wonderful world that is horses. My advice would be, head on down the road. I've boarded, worked, trained, showed at a lot of different stables in the south, west and now northwest, and though some have certainly seen the little dramas come up, most have been happy, healthy, fun environments to learn and have genuine comraderie. And after all, isn't that what it's all about?...
  10. Hi there. This is such a common issue, and one people don't readily address. I see so many horses move off when their riders mount, and the riders just accomodate it. Sounds like a behavior issue if he stands quietly when held. The mounting block is a great idea. Just stand on it. Have your reins looped up around the horn and the second he starts to move off, pull and back him up and say WHOA!... You have to be experienced enough to back him from the ground. If not, let another do it. Every time he flinches, back him up... while you are on the ground. This is work and eventually he will whoa and stand still while you stand on the mounting block. Then sometimes get on, sometimes don't... make it an unknown for him. Then, he will probably stand til your butt hits the saddle. If he moves off then, same thing while you are on him, WHOA! and back him up. Make it work for him, back him up ten feet. Then pitch him the reins and invite him to move again. Be very consistent, no rein pressure. Even one step gets a ten foot back up. Then when he does stay put, finally, with SLACK reins, ALWAYS make him stand there, at least 3 minutes, before you move off. This way he gets it programmed in his head that there will be nothing going on for a while. You will be surprised how quickly this will right this issue. Good luck, and what a pleasure it is to get on a willingly quiet pony. Sincerely, Jak