Southerngurl01

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About Southerngurl01

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  1. Too little carbs/calories can also cause insulin resistance. It always depends on what the horse needs. It's a balancing act.
  2. I don't know. Looks gimmicky to me. Founder always mainly comes down to diet and a proper trim and then protection as needed. The other stuff is fluff IMO.
  3. I like my st croix nippers. I sharpen them like Pete Ramey shows which makes them a lot sharper than they come when you buy them. GE also has a very good reputation.
  4. I could see it being helpful for super hard bars like we get here in the hot, dry part of summer. That is about it. You don't have to trim sole to bring a foot back, unless there is actually excessive sole depth. You do, often, have to trim lamellar wedge, which looks like sole. But true sole grows from the bottom of the coffin bone only if you go into that, you're trimming back too far since the coffin bone is our guide in the front of the foot.
  5. What's his collateral groove depth, toe and heel?
  6. I don't see any pictures
  7. Do keep in mind that protein, at least in humans, does cause an insulin response, like carbs. It can be quite high actually. The reason is, insulin pushes protein into muscles as well as sugar among other functions. I think this is why some IR horses can't handle alfalfa even if the NSC isn't high. So the safest calories are fiber (structural carb) and fat. Fat has its limits because of rumen floura, wheras you can't hardly get too much fiber.
  8. I suspects supplements, wormers etc can come into play because they do burden the liver. And the liver is responsible for clearing insulin from the blood (and also stress hormones). When it's not working effectively, this is delaying the necessary drop of insulin in the blood after it's done its job, causing more insulin exposure to the cells. The cells already have all the glucose they need and start to up their resistence to the insulin to prevent getting an excess. But it will flow into the fat cells (but still at a restricted rate, next it comes out the urine). This insulin sticking around too long may also clear too much glucose from the blood, causing the liver to shoot some more back into the blood, continueing the cycle. I think it's why a seemingly small amount of carbohydrates can cause so much inflammation and problems in a body with deranged sugar metabolism. And I think it explains why insulin resistence seems to happen so easilyin this world.
  9. Do "internal pathologies" really matter when the horse is sound and stays that way?
  10. The ring is no shocker, if just one that's probably a good thing. Is she "sound"? Do you have a good farrier? Horses that haven't been trimmed in a long time will likely have bars grown into their sole, some farrier's/trimmers won't catch these.
  11. Most of the horses I trim are gaited, fox trotters and walking horses. I don't trim them any different than the quarter horses or drafts or ponies :). All the same indicators.
  12. He's likely going to have more atrophy than the typical shod horse, so transition will be more difficult, but more necessary too. I would have good boots and a knowledgeable trimmer ready first.
  13. I just can't stand to be around horses not on my feet.. yet I wear flip flops around them all the time lol
  14. Just a safety note, sitting on the ground next to a horse is taking more of a risk than being in the usual farrier stance. You are more vulnerable and unable to move out of the way as quickly as when you are on your feet.