t_air_e_4286

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About t_air_e_4286

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  • Birthday 04/02/1986

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    The Cliffs of Insanity
  1. Have you started any sort of puppy class with him? Some dogs just need lots of mental stimulation and work to be happy. Maybe feed him in something like a Kong Wobbler? Bring him over to play with Hudson....well, I don't have a fenced in yard so that wouldn't work
  2. I will willingly & freely admit that I have never tried it on a horse, especially not under saddle and that I'm not sure that I see a difference between click and a release of pressure. I'm not sure you guys totally understand how clicker training works. Do you ever see people who are doing agility or rally click after every jump or after ever sign, or at the end of their pattern? No, because clicker training is generally for learning, or shape, a new cue not for established cues. Then you start chaining cues together and the finished product is an animal that will stick with you through the entire thing. When training a new thing with the horse, you reward 'try,' it's the same idea. Example, teaching a spin, at first you reward the slightest indication that they are going to move that shoulder over, then you up the requirements a little bit. If the horse accidentally takes a few more steps that you expected, say a quarter or half spin, you praise heavily. That is what clicker trainers call a "Jack Pot" The idea is pretty simple. Training animals is, in it's simplest form, a binary language. The animal asks a question, 'is this what you wanted?' and you reply with either a Yes (click or release of pressure) or No (silence or continued pressure). It's just another tool in the language tool box
  3. His 'breeder' didn't care enough about health to not breed merle to merle, who knows what other demons he had. You did the right thing for everyone involved. In all honestly, I am not in a good position to house a dog that is set on killing my other dog and if I had a dog like Jack I would make the same decision you did. I have a friend with 2 dogs that co-existed, but didn't really get along. When not there to supervise, one dog was locked in the bedroom, the other was locked in another part of the house. One day last year, when the owners were both at work, the dogs managed to get together. The ends result was that 1 dog killed the other, and the 2nd dog was put down due to his extensive injuries. These dogs were owned by experienced dog people and the dogs and multiple doors between them. That is not a situation I would want on my worst enemy. You did the right thing for anyone involved, you did what you needed to keep Chopper safe.
  4. my guess is sooty palomino.
  5. Hudson is 1.5 and still intact with no plans of neutering him in the future. If I had a female, I would spay around 2 years because I don't want to deal with heats and pyos are scary. But, I have a male who does not mark inappropriately inside, he is not left outside unattended, he doesn't hump, and we don't own an intact female. I have no reason to neuter him. I do know that some people will neuter their males at 5-7 to try to avoid prostate issues. I've attached the PDF for the study that was published earlier this month on this. The breed they used for this study was Vizslas, but I know there is one published with Goldens and another with Rotties. http://www.caninesports.com/uploads/1/5/3/1/15319800/vizsla_javma_study.pdf I would rather see a male or female neutered/spayed early (6 months) than risk an unplanned litter. But I think that if you are able to keep your dog contained, waiting to neuter/spay is something to look into. At the end of the day, it is up to the owner and what they feel confident on being able to handle & live with. For me, it's "when he gives me a reason to" and so far he hasn't.
  6. Sorry, I was talking about the beef bones. Raw weight bearing bones from large animals - beef, deer, bison, pigs (i think), etc are very, very strong and not actually edible. You do occasionally see splintering with these types of bones as well, but more than likely you'll see a dog chip a tooth.
  7. you have to be careful with the weight bearing bones. They can crack teeth
  8. I do feed raw chicken (and turkey) bones. Backs, necks, wings, whatever I can find at the store.
  9. You guys know that people stack their GSDs to give them that extreme rear end angulation and dropped hip look, right?
  10. Bolded for emphasis I don't think you know how the various protection sports work.....
  11. I like to remind people that it's still illegal to lock a child in a crate for any length of time, unlike a dog
  12. Heidi, I feel for you. I had a co-worker just last week complain to everyone about how much she loves her cat and would hate to get rid of him but he sheds too much and she has to sweep every day. She then tried to tell everyone that it will be so much easier when she has kids because they won't be so messy. I looked at her and said, "Seriously? You think kids will be easier than a CAT?" Then then next day she said something about how she might give her cat to her parents or her in-laws and get a puppy. I (maybe snarkily) reminded her that dogs ALSO shed. So, all in all, I have no suggestions but wish you the best of luck.
  13. There is also the size to think about. Can you imagine a mini on a bus or a taxi? A lab can curl up at a person's feet or under a seat, a little harder with a mini
  14. I know that double merle issues don't pop up in Catahoulas like they do in shelties, aussies, etc. and it just baffles me. I know other breeds (like Koolies/Coolies) also have less of an issue with double merle genes and it's just weird! lol. I really have nothing else to add.