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emerine

3 way rigging

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I dont even know what that means. What kind of saddle is it english or western? DO you have a picture you coudl show me? Just so I can understand what you are talking about.

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On 3-way rigging, which is where, instead of the usual D-ring that you'd attach the latigo or tie strap and off-billet to, it's more like a B-ring, or double D-ring, on each side. You can either use the front rings, back rings, or both sets of rings in a Y configuation. I'd have to look at it and play with it a bit to be able to remember how it's done (or admit defeat and ask Hubby!). I just use one ring or the other. If I remember correctly, the purpose of 3-way rigging is that the girth can find it's own sweet-spot, where it would naturally want to ride, without encouraging the saddle to slide.

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Hey Thanks!!! My hubby said he thought it was

a Y configuration, but he couldn't remember

exactly how it was supposed to be tied off. I

guess he knows more than I thought!

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A 3 way rigging on a western saddle allows you to use one of three possible rigging positions. Full rigging is in the front slot, 3/4 rigging is in the back slot and if you use a Y configuration, you get 7/8 rigging. The purpose of the 3-way is to set your saddles position most comfortably for your horse depending on the horse's conformation. Don't forget that the off side should be configured the same as the near side.

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The 3-way riggings I have seen always have the latigo attached to the REAR ring. From there, you thread the latigo down through the cinch ring, up to the front ring, back down through the cinch ring and then back to the rear ring, where you tie it off as you would a regular latigo with the half loop and tuck around the leather and ring.

If the latigo is very long, you can take a second loop from front ring to cinch, back up to front ring and down to cinch and THEN to the back ring...however, most I've seen are able to be done the way I described above.

Some have the latigo begin on the front ring, take two wraps through the front ring and cinch and then back to the rear ring to tie off.

Offside holding the cinch in place is fit the same way so it will be balanced, do not mix cinching styles.

This keeps the cinch from getting too close to the elbows and soft skin of the armpit where it could rub galls into the skin.

Heidi

[ 08-31-2006, 09:48 PM: Message edited by: Heidi n Q ]

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I have a billet on the off side, so if I'm

understanding you guys correctly, If I want to

use the Y configuration on the near side, I

need to get rid of the off billet and do a

Y configuration on that side too?

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Actually, to do it properly, you need a latigo or tie-strap on the offside as well, instead of a billet. Even if you use a half-breed billet, it still won't give you the length you need.

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The best person to ask on here is probably Jack Baumgatner...he knows more about saddles than anybody else I know. Maybe he can give you a good description or a diagram.

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