ivette_a2004

How To Get Rid Of A Hay Belly On A Weanling?

23 posts in this topic

Ok Knight is 6 months old and i have wormed him every month as instructed my the vet with Ivermectin and Safe Guard so i don't think he is wormy. he has free access to hay 24/7 so i think it's a hay belly. How do you make it go away? I know i can't really exercise him hard so what do you do?

Here is the last pic i took of him.

IMG_0290.jpg

It's actually bigger now. He does not look proportioned. He eats Alfalfa pellets in the morning 1/2 scoop and Heritage professional 1/2 scoop in the evenings this feed is the same as safe choice just without the price tag. I know he is growing but i am i panicking for no reason or should i be worried?

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A hay belly - to me - and ON ME for that matter [Crazy] is just indicative of lack of muscle tone.

A person could always pony from another horse or an ATV I suppose.....but I really don't see it as an issue.

He doesn't look overweight to me....matter of fact he looks like a very pretty colt in shiny condition.

CR

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I guess i am being a worry wart. He has been so cute from the start and he is changing and i guess i don't want to see him ugly LOL. although i know most horses do the ugly growth thing i don't want to see it with him. I am silly i know.

Here is another pic

IMG_0291.jpg

Edited by Halo's Mom

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Dang that's a purdy colt !

* * * * *

I'm thinkin' you need to take two aspirin...........and call me when he's pushin' three years old so I can come and pick him up..............

:winking:

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First I don't see anything wrong with the photo, looks good to me.

A hay belly will come on some horses that are eating a large quantity of (possibly) lower quality hay, they eat more bulk and it fills them out as it moves through the digestive system. If those same horses where to be put on a given amount of high qaulity hay, with possibly grain (concentrates) they may lose that belly and instead gain fat allover.

The true hay belly to me is when you can see the ribs but the horse has a huge belly as well. Eating a lot of hay in the effort to get the nutrition or just boredom, maybe.

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I also see no hay belly in those photos! If you are worried, get him more alfalfa pellets and less grass hay.

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Looks like a normal weanling to me, and I have 5 of them this year. If you are worried about it, get him some probiotics, it won't hurt anything.

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I need to take new pictures. I will get some today and post them tomorrow. See it has gotten worse since i took these pics. I was looking at him from behind on Sunday and he has a pot belly. he is not skinny anywhere and you can't see his ribs but the belly is sticking out which is what makes me think he has a hay belly not wormy. I will get more pics this evening.

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First I don't see anything wrong with the photo, looks good to me.

A hay belly will come on some horses that are eating a large quantity of (possibly) lower quality hay, they eat more bulk and it fills them out as it moves through the digestive system. If those same horses where to be put on a given amount of high qaulity hay, with possibly grain (concentrates) they may lose that belly and instead gain fat allover.

The true hay belly to me is when you can see the ribs but the horse has a huge belly as well. Eating a lot of hay in the effort to get the nutrition or just boredom, maybe.

I don't see a hay belly either. And, I have to agree w/this. When you have a poorer quality hay, the hay will accumulate in the cecum. It can stay there for up to 72 hours, and the cecum will become expanded. Switching to a better hay should get rid of a hay belly.

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I also don't see a hay belly. You can't compare him to a weanling that has been fitted up to show

I also agree that feeding a higher quality hay works for young growing horses because they just don't have the bowl volume to process large amounts of lower quality hay and derive enough protein to meet their growth demands

I believe it is advised to feed at least hay that is 14% protein to young growing horses-combined with the right amount of minerals to support that growth

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You can send this poorly starved, abused, and neglected boy to me and I'll fix him up. ;) Just no returns! - He looks great. Just a growing boy!

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Ok got more pics of the baby LOL i swear he has a big belly and looks crappy to me but what do i know.

IMG_0319.jpg

IMG_0322.jpg

IMG_0323.jpg

Now from the back i don't see it just from the side

IMG_0316.jpg

I know i am nuts

As far as the hay he gets great quality bermuda hay i make sure they get the green stuff nothing nasty they get round bales and free choice of this stuff and they eat every bit of it.

Edited by Halo's Mom

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Ok then i am a dork! I guess i am just wanting him to bloom and since he is growing he looks doofy to me lol.

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Weanlings do reach ackward growth spurts, and combine that with them not shedding out fully that first year (at least in our climate zone), they can appear rather scruffy compared to the rest of the horses

he does have a bit of a belly, which if it really concerns you could go with an alfalfa second cut hay and a grain ration.

Soon as you feed for optimum growth though, the amount of minerals and percentage become more critical

Horses can be fed for maximum growth, but only if they have the right amount of minerals to support that growth, and that is where people get into trouble.

A slower growth rate is more forgiving of mineral imbalances and slight deficiencies

Free excercise and play go along way to conditioning the weanling 's muscles and joints, and weanlings raised on ample pastures , allowed to play with fellow weanlings , do develope fittness and tone which is never possible with confinement

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He lives in a pasture 24/7 with a yearling and my old gelding Kon in a herd situation he has about an 1 acres to run and play with them which they do. Alfalfa here in Oklahoma is a bad deal the real stuff gets blister beetles. i do give them Alfalfa pellets in the morning. and grain in the evening his diet is mostly forage with some grain. I was using he ADM grow strong minerals and Show boost RB but i can't seem to find that stuff near me without paying 70.00 in shipping. He was looking awesome when he was on that stuff so maybe i just need to get him on it again.

Edited by Halo's Mom

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I do see what you are talking about, and I do understand why it bothers you! I like my babies to have slim, trim bellies too! Ditto smilie, more protein content. He really doesnt look bad though. I have seen FAR worse here on HC, and shockingly there are many people who think a ribby, gutty weanling or yearling is acceptable and normal!

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I don't do ribby. I prefer them a bit chubby this time of year, and free choice hay is better than too much grain and messing up young joints. They DO soon grow out of the haybelly stage.

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Thanks everyone i love him no matter what hay belly and all LOL... He is such a sweet colt i just hope he stay's that way.

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