kidsncritters

Bars- How Far To Trim Them?

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Ok the more I read the more confused I get. How much to you take off the bars of a hoof? My mare, Mattie, is very sensitive to her bars. If they get high at all or even level with the wall, she gets ouchy. Take them down and right away she licks her lips and walks off sound. I have read debates where they say take them down to the sole and just trim them lower than the wall. How do you know. I also have read to leave them alone if they keep popping back up? The more I learn, the more I don't know.

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Your horse told you what she needs...Dont listen to some prescribed trimming method..If the horse is comfortable moving where you ride and growing a good foot, then what your doing is the right thing to do for you.

My horses need a little more bar to be sound here on our rocky trails. They told me that by being ouchie if I trim them too short. If I trimmed them out heavily I would never have a sound horse here.

Letting them overgrow is also bad tho as it casues alot of issues also...

So, Overgrown is bad, too short for that horse is bad...there is a happy medium for each horse. Go with your gut.

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If they pop right back, it can either be because they are compacted or because the horse needed them. Up to us to figure that out :) But, if they are compacted, they will start to slow back down obviously.

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Ditto Trinity... you trim to what the horse dictates.

A big DITTO on overlayed or ingrown bars. I picked up a client Saturday who's two racking ponies have HORRIBLY ingrown/impacted bars. The "farrier" (a term I use loosely here) has been doing nothing but rasping the hoof level...truly level...and taking off all sole callous, never properly trimmed bars...just rasped flat. Consequently these two boys are in AGONY.

Since they were only trimmed last week, all I could do was bevel the wall (since the farrier doesn't have the word Bevel in his vocabulary) and trim a TINY bit around the impacted bars, just to see where they were. One of them, I found a black line running parrallel to the impacted bar line....thrush that's been living there for who knows how long. Oy.

Owner and daughters are under STRICT rules: NO MORE SUGAR goes into the mouths of those horses. Their feet told me their biggest story: recurring mild laminitis.

I will be going back in two weeks to check and re-roll. Our goal is some concavity in six months.

Edited by Chocomare

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Choco- do you have any pics of overgrown bars? When they are kind of grown into the foot how do you go about trimming them? Trying to educate myself.

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Alas, I did not bring my camera. The one horse was VERY sore and lame, so I just chucked the stand and tools into my car and hauled butt.

Since I am due to go back on the 26th, I'll try and remember to grab the camera.

To answer the question, tho, just picture a truly flat hoof....no ridges from the bars, no distinguisable seat of corn, no ramp from heel down to sole plane. The bars are there....they are just "hidden" within the sole plane..... somewhere!

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Part two: right now, there is nothing to trim with my knife. I tried a tiny bit of bar cutting on the non-lame horse (the one where I found the hidden black line o'thrush)... I just used the curved end of my knife on each side of where the bar Should Be to see what I'd find.

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