teampenninglady123

How Many Pounds In A 'scoop"?

28 posts in this topic

My whole life I have always fed my horses with those plastic scoops you get in feed stores...(yes, they have actually been around that long...)

I want to see how many days it takes for Trey to go thru one 50 lb. bag of feed.

So I went to consult the scoops per day....I have never converted the scoops into pounds...EVER!!! :duh:

I just followed my Dad's formula for feeding 'by the scoop"....what a sheep-le I am.....

anyway....how much per pound can one scoop hold in feed?

I feel so darn silly for asking!! :ashamed0002::ashamed0002:

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It depends on the size of the scoop and the type of feed :-)

ETA: Sorry I'm not at all helpful. I'm the exact opposite, I've always fed by pounds, so when someone asks me "how many quarts does your horse get" I'm like....uhhh, I don't know! LOL

Edited by Milo

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Okay. Forget what I had here originally. Lol. I googled it. I found scoops in the measurements of 24 oz., 58 oz., 5 oz., 2 qt., and 3 qt.

There are 16 ounces in a pound, and a quart is 32 ounces. So, would one scoop be half a pound?

Edited by jumps_n_barrels907

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Three quart scoops...now I feel really dumb...cuz I know what they are in quarts...but still not in pounds.

The blonde in me amazes me sometimes.... :wacko::wacko:

edited cuz it is 7:30ish in Am and my fingers won't type right yet...

Edited by teampenninglady123

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Okay. Forget what I had here originally. Lol. I googled it. I found scoops in the measurements of 24 oz., 58 oz., 5 oz., 2 qt., and 3 qt.

There are 16 ounces in a pound, and a quart is 32 ounces. So, would one scoop be half a pound?

First of all, but this logic a 32 oz scoop would be 2 pounds. What you're missing is that for liquids, they're measured in fluid ounces, and that can carry over to scoops.. that's a volume measurement. For solids, you have ounces as a measurement of weight, which is different than volume.

The only way to know it to get a scale, I personally use a fishing scale with a hook, 30# limit so I can also weigh hay, put on my smaller buckets, zero out the scale, and then add in 3 qts and now I know how much that weighs... Different feeds weigh different amounts as well.

I know that 3 qts of TC Senior or Blue Seal SBP-14 weighs 2.5 lb. For my ration balancer I have a nifty scoop that I got from a Purina seminar that has 3 different measurement scales for different feeds. I figured out what the line was for 1 and 2# of my ration balancer and that's how I measure that.

Just for fun... per this scoop, my ration balancer, Kent Topline 32, weighs the same as Purina Strategy.

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I count the number of scoops per bag and then divide it by 50 pounds. It varies from feed to feed because of the density of feed. Or you can take a scoop and weigh it on a kitchen scale.

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I count the number of scoops per bag and then divide it by 50 pounds. It varies from feed to feed because of the density of feed. Or you can take a scoop and weigh it on a kitchen scale.

While this works, you can be feeding for 5-20 days without the appropriate amount of feed. Also, if you miscount your scoop count...

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A scale is the only way to know.

Scoops are like the old question "what's heavier, a pound of lead or a pound of feathers?"

It's not the volume, it's the weight.

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A scale is the only way to know.

Scoops are like the old question "what's heavier, a pound of lead or a pound of feathers?"

It's not the volume, it's the weight.

^^ That's what I was going to say.

Fuego gets a combination of Ration Balancer, Rice Bran pellets, Barley and Alfalfa pellets. They all weigh VERY differently - the Alfalfa pellets is the heaviest of all and he gets a small coffee can of that compared to a big coffee can of Barley - but it weighs the same on the scale.

I weighed it all out once and figured out the container size and just go by that at each feeding now.

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True, it's the weight not the volume that matters. So a pound of dry cob could have a different volume than a pound of senior feed.

Easiest thing is grab a scale (your bathroom scale if that's all you've got) and weigh out a pound. Grab a Sharpie marker and make a line on the inside of the plastic scoop where the pound line would be. (I also right just above the line what feed it is). Then you never have to worry about forgetting. :)

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True, it's the weight not the volume that matters. So a pound of dry cob could have a different volume than a pound of senior feed.

Easiest thing is grab a scale (your bathroom scale if that's all you've got) and weigh out a pound. Grab a Sharpie marker and make a line on the inside of the plastic scoop where the pound line would be. (I also right just above the line what feed it is). Then you never have to worry about forgetting. :)

Thats a great suggestion!

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I filled a gallon ziploc with the grain from my scoop. Took it to wally world in my purse and weighed it on their produce scale. Then I knew how much of that kind of grain my scoop held.

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You had ROOM in your purse for THAT?? How BIG is your purse? I couldn't get a QUART baggie full in mine!

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I feed by scoop too.... but I have measured the weight of mine get.

Kelly and Ginger get a scoop and a half, twice a day. That weighed in at around 6 pounds or something... I think. I can't really remember. It's been a while since I weighed it, but it hasn't changed since then. Same scoop, same grain.

Grain is easy for me... it's the beet pulp that gets me. Do you weigh it dry or soaked? Cause you know it's LIGHT and it takes a crap load of dry beet pulp to make a pound, then soak it and your crap load dry turns into a mountain soaked....

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I have a little scale I'll bring out for you if I can find it.

Are you feeding him strategy? Because the big Wendy's cup that I use (yeah, and you all think your scoops are low rent, lol) holds 2.5 lbs of strategy. You could use it to get a fairly decent idea of how much weight fits in your scoop.

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Grain is easy for me... it's the beet pulp that gets me. Do you weigh it dry or soaked? Cause you know it's LIGHT and it takes a crap load of dry beet pulp to make a pound, then soak it and your crap load dry turns into a mountain soaked....

You should measure it dry and then soak it. If you needed to go by the soaked weight everyone would be different because that's all dependent upon the amount of water that you add.

So yea... it's a HUGE amount of beet pulp. :twitch:

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LOL, I have a low rent scoop too. It's an old coffee mug that I know holds a smidge under a pound.

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Corc....yes...scale...thanks.

Corc...I am also feeding that emaciated 30++ year old horse with little to no teeth while owners are out of town since last Sunday....

He started to go "down" again since about a month ago....and they said he was "not really eating all of his feed".....

I think it was b/c they stopped feeding him 2x a day and went back to once...so they went back to too many scoops per feeding...and stopped wetting the feed like I told them too. ( he is on pasture...for those reading this besides Corc... who don't know)

Since I have been feeding him...I have him at 2 scoops (senior strategy) mixed with salt and a touch of corn syrup for flavor....I suppose it tastes salty and sweet ( my two favorite things) b/c he goes to town on it....then heads straight for the water in front of me.

I do this twice daily and am giving him his own pile of hay...away from the rest of the horses...from the round bale they have....which I think they stopped doing that for him too.

He now has water in eyes and a hydrated look to him...he is peeing much more than before...and he is roaming the field and running up to me...before he had that stay in one place cuz I am too weak thing going on with him.

I think they got L-A-Z-Y on him and he is too easily able to go down b/c he is not young and not at a finished weight...so every pound counts.

i want to measure him like we did Louvin so I can monitor his gain/loss....I see a slight normal-ish under his belly so I know he is out of danger...but waaay too early to see any kind of real gain by eyes yet.

Got me to thinking, b/c they brought me only one sack (50lbs)...and since I was in mind to weigh trey's feed to see how much he goes thru in week...I really am thinking about this horse now.

Edited by teampenninglady123

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I do not use scoops... I use cans... Soup can, 15 oz veggie can, 28 oz tomato can, 1 lb coffee can, 2 lb coffee can... ( now coffee cans are not 1 and 2 lbs any more! ) ... however I do weigh it with a 4 lb scale I got at Wal- Mart... before I bought the scale... I would measure the feed out by the can, put it in a ziplock bag, and take it up to the local post office ( small rural one) and had them weight it for me... I know which can to use for a lb of beet pulp, alfalfa pellets, sweet feed and calf mana rations.....

Cans work better for me... if I should have someone feed for me... a level can can only hold so much... but a scoop can be heaped, leveled off, or scant.... this just works best for me... Syc

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I have always used a scale, and feed by pounds, rather than by scoop or quarts. Everyone has their own method which works best for them, I guess.

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Hmmm ... and I didn't realize how many people are so particular about getting the "exact" amount of feed right! LOL!

I don't feed grain to everyone here. My old mare Lady, Jake's dam, will not eat pelleted feed, beet pulp, rice bran, etc. She likes grain. So I feed her wet COB. Since she has cancer and will be put down as soon as the ground allows me to get a backhoe into the field to dig a hole. In the meantime, I keep hay in front of her 24/7 and she gets a gallon bucket of wet COB twice a day. No clue how much it weighs but I can say a gallon of wet COB will weigh more than dry COB and I think the pelleted Senior Feed weighs more than the wet COB does.

My new mare Amber needed some weight, and she's 20, so since SHE isn't so picky as to not eating pelleted feed, I am feeding her Senior Feed -- can't remember the brand right now. I have a coffee can -- is it still a "can" if it's plastic? Anyway, it's one of the regular sized cans of Folger's Coffee and I gradually worked her up to about 3/4 of a can of the Senior topped with a scoop of wet COB as a treat on top. Dessert!

Skipper, who really doesn't need the grain but has me well trained; he drives me NUTS banging on the gate and jumping/stomping in place if I don't give him some! So he gets a scoop or two of grain, like maybe 2" or 3" deep in a gallon bucket.

No one else gets grain except after riding, or a handful here and there as a treat. I do the mineral tubs every other month; sometimes they go thru them quick and others times it lasts over 2 months. I guess it depends on their need! I don't do any other supplements or anything unless I see where they are lacking something. I guess it's just not a habit I ever got in to? I think the more we try to "help", the more we often are actually "hindering"; Forcing the body to convert the necessary nutrients from good forage and hay is preferably and in most cases, the horse is healthier. There ARE exceptions, of course. And there are instances where for certain times you want to help as much as possible, like when the horse is sick or in hard training. It's been proven the body will quit exerting the effort necessary to process vitamins and such out of the food if vitamins are given on a regular basis. Sometimes that's not a good thing!

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Hmmm ... and I didn't realize how many people are so particular about getting the "exact" amount of feed right! LOL!

I'm particular because I can't afford not to be. At $25/bag it's expensive to overfeed my critter. :twitch: A bale of hay is $10-12 here. So yes, I measure carefully. :winking: My horse, of course would tell you I STARVE him! LOL!

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Cans work better for me... if I should have someone feed for me... a level can can only hold so much... but a scoop can be heaped, leveled off, or scant.... this just works best for me... Syc

Good point!

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