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llbperformancehorses

Hoof Falling Off?

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My mare had an injury back in December that was primarly to her pastern. She skint both sides of it and was treated with antibiotics, cold water therapy, and dmso wraps. About 2 months after the injury she developed an abcess which was treated with the medicated wraps to pull out the abcess and antibiotics (again). Well 3 months later she is still lame. When we got her out yesterday to trim her, we noticed a crack running horizontally around the hoof a little less than half way down. The crack has been growing out since the injury and we were not to worried about it. My farrier was keeping a check on it and felt as if it was just from the injury and would not effect her at all. BUT yesterday looking at the foot, her hoof wall is falling off. starting at that crack, it is literally peeling off. it was about half way around the foot. Have you ever heard of anything like this? Other than the injury back in December my coming 6 yr old mare has never been to the vet other than for annual coggins, etc.

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Photos will help a lot, I think what you have, based on description, is an abscess point causing a horizontal crack from having too much pressure from torque, I think if you have it beveled more to keep the weight off it, it will be less problematic, but I really think me and the rest of us need photos to better analyze the situation

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You gotta post pics...

Sounds like the trauma has caused lamellar death from crack on down.

A girl asked this question in Dr. Kellon's class, just the other night, but she posted on somebody else's thread and didn't get answered. I'll have to check back. I would be interested in hearing her answer. I have also heard this before, where they found the hoof sitting in the pasture and couldn't figure out which horse lost it, all were fine. It was ready to come off is why things were fine. Just keep a sharp eye on everything.

Definitely a balanced trim on the old. Any torque on that old wall is going to jam upwards into that crack and bite into the crack with the wall pressure coming up the wall from the ground. This would also promote the tearing of the lamellar attachment that is, as well as jaming old into new, adding insult to injury. Its the growth above the crack that matters. I'd have a good bevel on this foot.

Get clean and stay clean. Boot if necessary after the peeling and if support is needed due to lack of wall, then boot with good pads. I would boot anyway. It would forge a better developed foot faster and keep it free from injury in the meantime. Maybe you'll be able to cast the foot.

Make sure this horse is getting the nutrition it needs to support healing. This is an inside job for her.

Edited by missyclare

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Has a vet or qualified farrier seen this horse? What was their opinion?

Regardless, a lameness that lasts that long needs to be seen by somebody with more powerful diagnostics at this point.

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Thanks for the input. I will try to get pictures this weekend and post them. Yes, this horse has been to the best horse vet around 3 times now, but not since the crack started to peel off. This just started happening Wednesday. My farrier who is a great farrier and really knows his stuff has looked at her every time he has been out since the accident, but like with the vet has not seen her since the crack started to peel off. Her lameness has been looked at by both the vet and farrier. when the injury happened x rays were taken and everything looked great. then when the lameness didnt go away we went back and it was the abcess which was treated. two weeks after the abcess was treated my farrier look at her give her a good trim and said because the abcess was where it was it would take a little longer for the lameness to go away. BUT it hasnt. We had decided to turn her out for a year and let her get back to normal before going back to her. We found the crack peeling off Wednesday when my husband was trimming her. He went to farrier school, but only does our barefoot horses.

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I had this happen with a gelding of mine. I thought he had foundered. He had 4 (one on each hoof) horizontal cracks all the way around the hoof that grew out from the band down.

I fed a vit + mineral supplement and also gelatin to promote healthy hoof growth and quicker hoof growth. When his cracks got about 1-2 inches down to the bottom of the hoof they started to peel away. The laminae before was already hardened and when it peeled off (I didn't assist let it happen by itself, kept a good roll on the wall) I just kept an eye on it and all was good. No problems.

My issue was an acute selenium toxicity.

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How long is this crack?

Good for getting the other two ducks in order. Since this is the case, I'd say you seeing a continuing lameness due to stress the crack is creating on the hoof. I'm sure if the wall under it came all the way off, you'd be left with exposed lamina. If it's what I think it is, I'd opt for a Clean Trax soak and revisit by the farrier sooner than later as he may be able to remove it and shoe the hoof so it the weight bearing load is even and stable around the whole foot until the crack is grown out completely so the coronary band won't become stressed. I'd also be painting that thing daily with Thrush Buster to kill any bacteria.

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From a plant actually. Horses aren't supposed to eat a plant called "broomweed" or "Broom Snakeweed." In sandier soils it has a habit of sucking up the selenium and being toxic. Well my boy was eating the stuff.. and obviously quite a bit of it. I observed him eating it, though I was told he shouldn't. This was how he got the poisoning. That year my land was covered in the stuff. Luckily it hasn't been that bad again.

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