Steven K. Gomo

Trimming Lame Horse

11 posts in this topic

I have a mare who has been growing progressively lame in front hoof. She gets around well and doesn't appear to be suffering otherwise. She just can't put full weight on leg for trimming long enough for me to trim opposite foot. Any suggestions?

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Call the vet is mine.

I might...as you do your own trimming, you might want to see what hoof testers show you. How long has this been going on?

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yes, how long has this been going on? A week or two, could be an abscess and I would recommend doing an epsom salt soak a few times a day. A month or two? I'd suspect a broken coffin bone or something similar - and you'll definitely need a vet to really tell you what is going on!

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At worst this is an old injury from a nail in frog 18 months ago. We treated it with epson salts soaking. She's a broodmare who hasn't been doing much for at least three years. It's an odd expression of pain, a rotating collapse towards her center line. I'll see if there's money for a vet.

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Talk to the vet. Worse case, you may have to buy some sort of pain reliever and give to her in order to get her hooves done...

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Oh, the forgotten brood mares! I appreciate your efforts on her behalf, I really do. The fact that she is a broodmare, who is lame and hasn't done much the last few years, puts a cold breeze on the back of my neck. Yes, always to the vet. It would also help to post pics here, according to the sticky at the top, really clean hoof and tell us about her history...age etc. You never know what might become of it and its free. At the very least, you may have a more intelligent conversation with the vet. It will take his diagnostics to know for sure what's wrong. Whether these funds will be forthcoming for this mare.....let us know. But pictures here would be worth a 1000 words and that makes for lots of thoughtful conversation....just sayin'... :smilie:

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Ditto all the above suggestions.

But to answer this question, fold a bath towel twice and put it under the opposite hoof you want to trim. Standing her on a mat for further cushioning would be great, if you have that option. If you have to be in gravel, I might get an XL bath towel and fold it three times. Let us know what the vet thinks:)

I have a mare who has been growing progressively lame in front hoof. She gets around well and doesn't appear to be suffering otherwise. She just can't put full weight on leg for trimming long enough for me to trim opposite foot. Any suggestions?

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hope I am doing this right..I have a Qh with tiny teacup feet that grows a long toe and no heel and she has thin sole. I have a farrier suppose to be a barefoot specialist but it's been a year and nothing have changed on her feet. I could take pictures of her feet on facebook but I couldn't find the old ones I use to have.

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Some progress. I've found that some of the difficulty comes from her conformation. She experiences pain when rotating her leg outward for trimming. Her response looked very much like some sort of pain in opposite foot, slowly collapsing. Now most of the pain is mine when trimming her in line with the shoulder. Isn't it marvelous that most horses can assume the farrier position? It really is accidental that they are able to.

She's still not great on one front foot. I checked around and found out that she had a nail injury to that frog with a nail 18 months previously. It was treated but research indicates that outcomes are very iffy with this sort of injury. She was good for a year but started gimping again.

Thanks for everyone's input. I found the horsecity notification emails in the junk mail. Sigh.

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Best of wishes. My older mare as very limited movement in her lower feet anymore, so I use a Hoofjack and put it wherever she needs it to be to be comfortable. Sometimes that is not very convenient for me, but as a beloved retiree she deserves the same level of care and consideration my other horse does.

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The difficulty with her conformation may be aggravated by the balance of the trim. Pics are needed. along with more history, especially with that abscess. It may have turned into a bone infection by this time. But whether it be the hoof or above it, the vet will help pinpoint it. Whether it be infection or arthritis involved, the common denominator is inflammation.

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