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LUVMYAQHA

Need Some Help Balancing Wry Hooves

40 posts in this topic

Hi all,

I have been lurking for quite a while on this forum and finally decided to post.

I was told that my horse is a conformation nightmare and she never would be riding sound again. Anyway, that's when I decided to try to trim her myself.

It's been a struggle and I'm almost ready to give up and just accept the fact that she will be a pasture pet.

That's why I'm posting here. Maybe someone I can give me some advice on what I'm doing wrong?

Thanks in advance

Let me know if the pictures aren't good enough I will post new ones...Thanks again

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More pics

I don't have any pics of the hind hooves but pretty much the same thing. The lateral heels are pushed to the inside and the hooves are off center, frog pointing to the inside.

Edited by LUVMYAQHA

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There is a stickied thread at the top of the hoof page on how to take pics. Need full body shots as well as hoof/leg pics. Those pics are a starting point but we need more info to be able to help.

Horses age/breed

known training history

current work level

ALL aspects of the horses diet

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10 year old Apha, she hasn't been ridden in a couple of years, before that arena work and trail but never been shown or anything like that.

Diet consist of grass hay and a couple of cups of beet bulb, just enough to mix in min/vit supplement.

During the day she enjoys 20 acres of pasture some grass and weeds nothing lush.

More pictures here http://s1168.photobucket.com/user/paint991/media/DSCF4324_zpseb047140.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0

Edited by LUVMYAQHA

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I think the biggest problem I see is that you are over trimming her. Let her have some hoof under her. Since you are taking her down to the sole, you are taking her down too far on the outside. Overall though, the trim is good, its just too extreme.

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Those heels are 1.5 inches tall..... I wouldn't quite call that extreme? But maybe I'm wrong and that's why I'm here to find out.

The soles are still covered in layers of bar from being unbalanced for a long time. She hasn't shed sole in years.

Here is a pic from before I even thought about trimming myself. The Barefoot Trimmer refused to take any heel because she wasn't shedding sole and wasn't ready.

Edited by LUVMYAQHA

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I need better pics. Some have important aspects that are not in the picture. Back up from camera to hoof and don't worry about the background. Hold the hoof by the fetlock joint and let it hang, lean forward enough to get the heels in with toe showing in the background. Hold the hoof like this always for this horse to help get the true run of bone. The toe, all the way back to the ergot is needed. Front shots of both feet with camera on the ground also, 3' out front of the horse. Same with side shots, 3' away and camera on the ground. The heel shot needs to be joint held/hung, but the solar shot, you can pull the hoof up and shoot straight down on the bottom of the foot...keep camera 1'-1.5" away from the hoof.

There is an extreme medial/lateral balance to this hoof, but until I can get a better idea of the run of bone, I cannot make a decision on the trim.

The turn of bone seems to be right where your hand is holding the hoof in the first shot. Its all about how the horse uses this foot and how the trim helps his run of bone or makes the situation worse. That's why I need good run of bone shots.

The trick is to get the trim balanced to the bone without over correcting and hurting things or letting it get out of hand and worsening things. That's what I suspect is going on here. It will always tend to have this pathology and the goal is to maintain balance according to the sole that mirrors the bone and keeping it in hand without trimming either too aggressively or too passively. Its not in hand right now. Hoof is too long, though walls are holding valiantly against the forces on it. Heels need to come down, though slowly, get balanced and definitely thrush treatments to strengthen everything and widen the heels for when the heels arrive...very important. The central sulcis should look like a mere thumprint depression on top of the frog, not a crack. This is a biggie for improved hoof health/strength. Give me good shots, I'll take a good look.

On the last pic, see the dents in the heels on both sides? That's where the heels need to be in the end...that's how long this hoof is. Real sole doesn't grow that long. That is false sole and tricked the barefoot trimmer. She perpetuated the imbalance, and left behind all the things that would have helped this horse get the ducks in order.

Edited by missyclare

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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15406247306" title="DSCI044711111 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5600/15406247306_18859c2104_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="DSCI044711111"></a>

The blue line is balance as close as I can tell with this pic. The red lines show how the imbalance has gotten out of hand and has been perpetuated by the trim.

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Thank you Missyclare for taking the time to look at my pics. I was really hoping you would!!!

I got more pics and I hope I got what you needed.

http://s1168.photobucket.com/user/paint991/media/DSCF4379_zps4a8cd79f.jpg.html?filters[user]=129597064&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

I hope you can copy the pictures from photobucket or should I post directly to this website?

I can't wait to find out what your opinion is. Thank you again

Edited by LUVMYAQHA

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Do you mean the heels are growing 1.5 inches above the sole? Because it really doesnt look that way in the photos. Each hoof is different. While this trim might be fine on another horse, to me, it looks like too much trimming. What happens when she grows out for 4 or so weeks? Does that improve her soundness at all?

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No, I can't get ahold of them. Best to post them here.

If anyone has Flickr, please tell me how to post pics here. All I seem to be able to do is post the link and I really do need to be able to post pics and words together when needed. Things I'm trying to show seem so dis-jointed. I gave up on Photoshop from lack of performance and have years of hoof drawings on there and can't even get in there anymore.

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I meant 1.5 inches from the heel bulbs. Letting her heels grow only forces her onto her toes. The bars don't grow normal, as they grow they get smeared onto the sole.

I posted the last picture to show what happens when the heels don't get trimmed. Layers and layers of bar.

The problem is that both front hooves are off center getting pushed to the medial side. The right front worse than the left front. This makes her rope walk, she has a hard time turning and when she goes

down hill she has to zig zag.

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Missy, I copied this from somewhere. I don't know if it works because I don't use Flickr.

How to embed a Flickr photo in another website or forum post:

Click on an image, then via the Actions tab, select View all Sizes. Next, select the image size you want, such as large.

Right-click the image and from the drop down menu in your browser, select Copy Image Location. The image url (address) will be pasted onto your clipboard. Paste the url into a forum post, or wherever. The image should appear. These instructions are for use with Firefox so menu names might be slightly different in other browsers.

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The more I look at this foot, the more I feel that the balance is not bad and that turn in bone isn't bad either because the symptoms are tending to be like they would on a normal hoof, despite the bone turn. The only thing that I can see suffering discomfort, is the thrushy/crowded frog.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15266362720" title="new2 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2941/15266362720_bf14b9a007_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="new2"></a>

The hoof has yet to settle into this trim, but its getting pretty close to the red line ideal. A matter of maintaining the bevel at the toe and pulling the heels back and down gradually, as you keep them balanced

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15459172612" title="DSCF4384_zpsb1b99939 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3934/15459172612_706e2946c4_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="DSCF4384_zpsb1b99939"></a>

With a hoof that is pidgeon=toed, the foot turns inward and lands that way. The hoof is breaking over diagonally from inside to outside instead of back to front. The first thing to come into contact is the inside heel. It depends....but IF that heel is high, It will throw a diagonal force and bump out 2-3 o'clock where it breaks over. IF the inside heel is too high along with a high inside quarter, then it dictates and the force runs up the inside wall to 10 o'clock, where it breaks over hard, then sweeps around the outside of the hoof breaking over on that side as it goes. IF the inside heel and quarter are really high, the force will come down on the outside all the way, but the angle of force will be coming down harder on the outside, driving past the wall and crushing it inward. IF the heel is too short, then support is lost, bone is turning more and outside is taking the whole brunt alone, the lion's share of the landing and the breakover. In this horse, the inside heel is high and also the quarter in front of it. Its running to a 10 o'clock hard breakover that showed separation in an older pic.

Look closely at the red heel balance line. It is balanced properly for a straight hoof. The yellow line below it is the same. The bottom yellow line is the turn. The existing balance on the heels agrees exactly with the bottom yellow line and run of bone. But, I'm seeing a higher heel, high quarter that's not quite happy. So how did I decide where the heel balance was? Look on the original pic to this one and look on the back of the heel platform and tell me that you see a rugged looking black line that's saying please trim me here. The outside heel is doing just fine with no complaints. Well, I know that I'd rather be in line with bone, but I'm seeing pathology that doesn't like it. I know that if I take it down too far, its not going like it either. But when I see the hoof telling me where it wants to be, I listen. If the request is within reason, I will obey, if its not in reason then I will sliver my way gradually there. Here, the hoof is telling me that it wants to be level like normal hooves, so that clinches it for me right there. I do as I'm told. This is what this horse wants, so no contest with junk going around in my head. The rest is easy, obey the sole, get the wall down flat and meticulously running even with the sole all the way around.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15275109088" title="DSCF4384_zpsb1b99939 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2949/15275109088_c097396f6d_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="DSCF4384_zpsb1b99939"></a>

This is the same picture close up. Think color and shape as well as the sole. Because there is a hard breakover at 10, it has pulled forward and bumped out of that circle that is the toe.The bump out front is in hand, but not the bump up. (trauma callous) It starts right at 10 and merges into a long high arch along the quarters, to connect with the high heel. See it? That's pull. It has also pulled the white line and sole up with it at the black arrow at 10, tricking you, thinking that's where it wants to be. If you imagine the heel balance line to be the horizon on the water, then the shape of the sole going around the hoof should be perfectly round like a sunset. Look at the shape of this sole line. You see it all when you look at it that way. The red sole line was the sole line followed at the last trim. the real sole line that is about to appear, if it hasn't already, is the black line. Now check its run/shape and situation at 10 and realize a better sunset. Look at how the high quarter is coming steeply down the inside of it to the sole line on the left. Think jam straight in from a pointed wall. Now look at the other side, not so steep, getting pushed outward more. Both quarters are flaring because they are long, but the high side is jamming and the low is splatting. A very normal horse scenario again. Remove all torque by getting dead even with the sole line all the way around + the bevel = removes the pinch points of torque that pulls on the hoof. The hoof may always tend to be this way because of the way its used and you'll be looking for the same pathology every time. Just obey the sole, not too much, not too little.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15461738445" title="4444444 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3930/15461738445_22e97996b2_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="4444444"></a>

Same pic again with a trim on it. The sole and bar inside the hoof is still getting its ducks in order, but is doing nicely. The bars are buried in false sole at the heels and are still high. The heels are not going to emerge and define themselves from sole if bars are not brought down to release it. Yes, you should bring the heels down according to theire readiness (frog too), but if you don't release the bars for the sole to come out, you're going to be waiting a long time for a sign to bring the heels down. The bar ramps are holding it there like a retaining wall. Not only that, they are pushing outward and pushing the sole property back, leaving dead air behind where the ramp is supposed to be. See the curved outward shape in the existing ramp and know that its also related to the contracted heels, which is related to thrush....all connected to each other.

See the bar ramp on the left. It ends where the crack is. This is because the height of bar beyond where the ramp ends is also high. That's why there is a crack. The weight comes down the bar ramp structure, which is tough, but once the ramp ends, so is the support and the continuing highness punches in and creates a crack. You can't go nuts taking the height of that material out in front of the ramp. Sensitive spot and because it is bruised from the punch, will need material left to protect while it heals underneath. So you sliver the top of the bump off it, removing the punch and leaving the base to protect....just a sliver removed at each trim as needed, no more. You can see it goes all the way around the frog apex like a necklace...again, just take the bump out things and put a small bevel(45)on edge facing the frog to bring it back and allow the frog to breathe. On the left side, just left of the bar necklace is an independant lump that also concerns me. Everything is migrating out to the side as normal, but when its on top of the sole its encroaching leading edge is also a punch line. The outside edge of that lump, the front edge of it and the outside edge of the bar necklace are all punch lines. I'd be slivering the difference in topography down these lines to marry them better. Aggravation thwarted, concavity coaxed and the rest left up to the horse. If you look at the front edge of that lump, you see a darker color of possible punch damage. Just marry the edge and the punch will subside and start to heal.

Sorry this was so long, but I hope it helps in how to "see". Its not just the rules, but shape and color as well that make the pages in that book. See it all before you start. I go take pics, go to the computer and come back with a plan and am meticulous about the right heel balance for my 2-turns below the knee horse. Obey the sole, fight the thrush, get her comfortable and move and all the things that have tearing your hair out will disappear cause the horse took care of it and is showing you what she wants. The guess work is gone and all you have to do is do as you are told.

Edited by missyclare

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Thank you Missyclare for taking the time to do all the markups!! You do an amazing job and I really appreciate it.

I did trim my horse yesterday morning. She walked of fine but a few hours later she came in for some water and was hardly putting any weight on the left front. She always does that when I take that medial side down and I can't figure out why?

Could Thrush cause her to be that lame? I didn't think she could have thrush since her frogs are bone dry, but she doesn't like me cleaning out her frog in the back of the collateral grooves. Anyway I didn't have anything for thrush, so I decided to try honey until I get some Thrush buster.

At dinner time she walked good, even trotted a little. Her hooves were packed with dirt from the honey. Did the dirt give her some support?

Missyclare do you have any ideas why this keeps happening?

Thank you

I'll add some pictures later

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Just wanted to update real quick. She was still walking good this morning. I cleaned the hooves and couldn't believe that the honey was still everywhere under the dirt. :shocked:

Anyway I cleaned the back of the frog and my hoof pick went in at least a 1/2 inch in the cleft of the frog. This never happened before!

Could the honey actually be working?

I ordered some magic cushion and hopefully that will help get rid of the thrush and make her more comfortable.

DSCF4473_zpsf2effe3c.jpg

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Its the shape of the frog that says sick to me. I think you're finding out that thrush runs deeper than you think. Epsom Salt and water, vinegar and water, or Dawn dish soap and water and don't rinse. Toothbrushes, Q-Tips and whatever it takes to ream out the bottom of that crack gently, that you just discovered and clean it. Getting clean is 9/10'ths of the battle.

It's not bringing down the heel that is soring her, its, bringing the thrushy frog into play and it hurts.

The medial/lateral balance is still off and I've drawn lines again. Wouldn't hurt to wait a few days of thrush treatments before trying again, but know it. White and green lines are coming down to the black lines.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15304713628" title="DSCF4473_zpsf2effe3c by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3944/15304713628_5851b9567b_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="DSCF4473_zpsf2effe3c"></a>

Edited by missyclare

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I have been soaking the hooves for a couple of weeks now. Borax soak daily and than sprayed apple cider once a day.
I'm not seeing much change, but I was able to take a lot of bar from the soles. I think I'm pretty close to live sole now.
She is definitely a lot more comfortably,but I know the hooves are still not balanced.
When I mark up my pictures it looks like the outside on both hooves is high now?
MissyClare could you mark up both hooves again? I would really appreciate it...you have been so much help already. Thank you
Left Front

DSCF4673_zpsbc8077f1.jpg

DSCF4675_zpsa5f3c7b7.jpg

Right Front

DSCF4676_zpsbb7b8595.jpg

DSCF4678_zps29b12207.jpg

Edited by LUVMYAQHA

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You're doing a great job on the thrush and its showing. The central sulcis is opening up, frog is widening, sole is clean and concavity is coming nicely. All this is promoted by the trim, but the thrush care is really showing positive changes to this hoof. The heels are still contracted and when the thrush is gone, the base of the frog will be wider with the heels, giving a better/stronger base to land on. Keep it up. As it heals and develops, the hoof becomes stronger and tells you what it wants. The thrush care is really the shining effort here. If you don't get it all gone, it will come right back to haunt you. So kudos to you for doing the homework, you're halfway there. :smilie:

As for the imbalance, it has improved as well. You have to remember that this hoof will always be imbalanced by the way its used via the way the bones run. Instead of pulling out your hair trying to decide which side is higher, obey the sole. You can't go wrong with obeying the sole.

You can also read the sole. On the pic right above, you can see that the outside of the foot is being weighted. The wall/sole is covered with callous and has yet to do some more developing and creating a new story from the last trim. The wall on the other side's shape is different, pointed high from not so much weight on this side. Get to know these visual symptoms. If there is imbalance, these symptoms will worsen. The only way to keep things in perspective for the horse, is to obey the sole. Not just trusting your eyes, but closing them and "feeling" the wall height and really getting the truth to the wall height vs. the sole and tweaking any high wall spots that bump out of that perfect sunset.

Right now, the hoof doesn't need anything much, except for more growth from the last trim to be able to talk to you confidently and continued development from the thrush treatments and some time to confirm new pages in the story. (let the growth talk to you, so you must wait for it.) When that happens, the growth tells you clearly what needs to be done and the guesswork and hair pulling is taken out of the equation. Patience on your sleeve at all times. The only tweeking I would do to this hoof is check the bevel and keep it maintained, put tiny bevels on the corners of sole that face the frog to give more breathing room and to make sure that the bars are straight ramps that merge out of the sole and go straight to the heel platforms without bumping up higher. This last will allow the heels to spread, back of hoof develop and help allow the frog/heels to widen with the thrush treatments.

So, I will give you a tap on the shoulder and send you back to look at your original pics and then tell me again that you see no improvement, cause I do, lol! Looking at the symptoms, the shape, the balance, the health....its all improving. Carry on. Let some growth happen and then let the sole talk to you, obey it and know, without question, that that is what the horse wants. This hoof is coming along well and has lost all its junk and it starting to tell you clearly, the true story. Just do as you are told, and give the growth time to tell you that story clearly first. Things will never be perfect, (never are) but it will be the best it can be in the face of it and the horse laughing at the pathology anyway. Carry on, you are well on your way!

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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15438087780" title="1111111111111111111 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3950/15438087780_4f7a96bab8_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="1111111111111111111"></a>

This heel balance is good, but ruined by one small factor that will continue to dictate. The difference between the yellow and black lines is the bar ramp bumping up higher than the heel platform and taking over. Just a tweak.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15438088580" title="222222222222 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3941/15438088580_ccceae6b24_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="222222222222"></a>

Random old shots to show you how the foot is being used....what I see.....

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15437679337" title="aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5607/15437679337_c67b828a02_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa"></a>

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/15003513763" title="bbbbbbbbbb by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5598/15003513763_0496b6e022_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="bbbbbbbbbb"></a>

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I have been thinking about updating for a while but I wanted to make sure there is some progress.
It's been slow going but I think I got some
really good improvement now! I'm still treating for thrush just stoped soaking a couple of weeks ago since it got too cold. I also switched from apple cider vinigar to No Trush powder. I haven't made up my mind yet which is better but I like that the No Trush is a power and it's still there the next day even if it is muddy.
I still got ways to go but I'm seeing the end of the tunnel :).
MissyClare .... could you take a look at the new pictures and tell me what you think?
I think I got the left front under control...I just have to make sure I take the inside toe when I lower the inside heel.
But the right front I'm not sure what is going on. Is the inside toe and heel still high? Or just the heel?
Thank you MissyClare ....you have been of so much help already and I really appreciate your input!
Edited by LUVMYAQHA

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Can you post the pics here again? I can't copy and paste them from your photobucket. There is still some rebalancing needed. The frog is coming along, but would do better if it could breathe. Contracted heels give the bar/heel attachment looking like cats ears. When the heels spread out, it will be better developed and frog no longer oval, but getting wider and wider as you go back. Complete thrush healing means that there is no crack on top of the frog, nor crack up the back. The cracks will fill in with healthy material and be gone, leaving a mere thumbprint depression on top of the frog profile....the heels will spread wider and frog also, taking it away from oval shape.

If you look at the groove depth and how high everything is on the outside of it, you can feel the frog is pinched by it all, mostly by the heels. The high bars and tall quarters + thrush, are holding the heels in place.

If you could post the 3rd pic up from here of the RF and the top two of the LF. I'll try to mark them up. What are the ground conditions like and are you feeding her a supplement? Minerals?

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Thank you MissyClare for replying... It's been snowing, cold, now warming up and muddy but should be drying up in a couple of day's than we go back to dry and hard clay ground. I'm afraid once everything dries up the heels contract again.

The crack in the frog on the left front is still quite deep. I absolutely agree with you that the heels are still pinching the frog, but I don't know what else to do to help open the heels up.

The right front still looks way off to me. She still seems to break over on the outside toe. When I look at the hoof from the bottom everything looks like it is level, but from the front it looks like the outside toe quarter

is high?

I do feed vitamin/ mineral supplement http://www.horsetech.com/high-point-grass.ht

This morning I was getting some more bar and now the hooves look quit a bit different than 2 days ago. Are the bars causing all the imbalance in the heels?

Edited by LUVMYAQHA

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Usually when I click on the pic, I get an enlarged version, then I click save, (bottom right of that pic) and then I can right click and copy and save it to my computer. This time, when I right click, I go to your photobucket, where I can do nothing. Photoshop says the link is too short, trundicated or something. What did you do last time?

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If you right mouse-click on the picture and click on "Save image as" then the picture will save on your desktop or were ever else you want to save too

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I've tried everything. I don't know why its not working. I can right click and save image as, but when I get to it on the computer, I get a grey camera on a blue background image and it won't open, is invalid. On the last three pics, I can't do anything but getsent to your photobucket.

I use to use photobucket, but left it for flicker and now all I can do it post links and not pics here.

Anyway, if you can figure it out, I'll draw lines, but things aren't bad. The quarters are long 3rd pic down on the RF. Can you detect the wings on highness on both sides of the hoof? The left side has two sole lines which both bump up over a wall-like callous from 9-10 o'clock. All should be brought down even with the inside sole line and exactly the same height as the top of that callous. If you let your eye follow the heights, starting at the left heel platform, just in front of the platform is where it should be, then it bumps up higher. I would go consistently forward to eliminate that rise, come right in tight to the top of that callous and meld into the existing toe height. The right heel is taller and needs to come down a hair. This wing's height starts at 2 o'clock and has a more gentle rise but longer, all the way back to and including the heel. It is the left quarter and remaining callous that was the main contention for the imbalance of this foot. Look at the first pic and draw an imaginary line across the heels and around the sunset. You see the right heel is higher and the left quarter is higher...diagonal torque between them. Make them merge with the sunset.

It helps to reverse the rasp in your hand when you get behind 10 and 2 o'clock on both sides and pull straight back into the established balanced heels. It helps to keep these wings away in the footprint. The right side needs the wall flat to ground at sole level and mounded shape gone only. The left side needs a bit more taken down. It is the higher side.

This is not your hoof, but compare the hoof shape of your third pic down and this one:

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14018894249" title="RR Heel new 2 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2904/14018894249_1725eb6261_s.jpg" width="75" height="75" alt="RR Heel new 2"></a>

Do you see how this footprint has no quarter wings of height?...straight back to the heels?

Same thing is going on with the LF. (2nd pic up from here) Right side needs to be re-shaped and absolutely even with sole and left side is higher again. Look at the sole line at 10 o'clock here. Splits in two. Follow the bottom one and straight forward to meld with the toe and back to in front of the heel platform.

These wings which are uncleared quarters, are not only bumping up with flare from the torque, but are also maintaining a line of pull from heel to toe. The quarters are the arch of the foot and need to be functional. Make them merge with the perfect sunset you want to see and follow that sole line and don't let it trick you. This is just a tweak, but an important one.

Hope this helps....

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I suspect that the computer is telling me that the address is incomplete, is because part of the code is visible with your pictures in your post. I have to get away from "link" connections, because that takes you back to your photobucket where I can't do anything. I can't copy it, I have to save it to my computer. Is it possible to copy and paste it yourself from Photobucket and post it free of links here? I need to be able to copy and paste the pic here, not the link to the pic that takes me to photobucket.

Don't give up on me. I am fairly well computer illiterate. This is disturbing. If I can't draw lines for you, I can't draw them for anybody. When I right click on the pic, I don't get save image as, but get....Photobucket. Everything I do takes me to Photobucket.

Problem #2

I left Photobucket about 5 years ago. They were performing terribly and I walked away. 10 years of hoof pictures became grey matter I can no longer access. I am with Flickr now, but cannot post the actual pic on the forum, only the link...again. That is not my goal of putting words and pictures side by side and think that's detrimental as well.

So, if we have to leave the subject for a sec and get technical, then so be it and keep moving forward. All suggestions are welcome, including moderators, just keep it clear for my sake, lol!

So, don't worry, we'll get back to the pictures. You may have to take a new set, but we'll get back to them. In the meantime, re-read all all my posts and study the latest pics you posted. Keep fighting thrush. If you look at the pics from start to now, you'll see your thrush care happening. When the hoof spits out infection and becomes stronger/more developed, it gets it own ducks in order and the worry is gradually removed from you.

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I opened up a flickr account, so hopefully next time I post pics you won't have any problems saving them.

I re-red everything and it all makes sense. I just have a hard time taking the inside down and than trying to take the outside quarter. I feel like the hoof is back to what it was.

I think I will have to deal with the trush until the heels bulbs are back too were they are supposed to be. They are still quite a bit pushed to the inside but a huge improvement too were I started!

I finished the NoThrush powder and I'm not impressed. I red that oil of oregano is supposed to work real well so that is what I'm trying out now. If I don't see a lot of improvement in the next couple of weeks I will go back to apple cider vinegar.

I'll post new pictures in a few days. We just got a bunch of snow and it's hard to take good pictures when everything is muddy.

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