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Flares On Front Hooves

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For almost a year now we have been trying to get flares on the front hooves fix.  It does look better since I got new farrier, but I have a couple questions.  Her front hooves flare towards the inside.  Farrier said that the hoof is growing faster towards the inside than outside.  It used to flare out real bad but has gotten better.  I did get pictures, but I am trying to figure how to post again.    I got before and after farrier trimmed her.  I was just wondering why she would be growing faster on the inside of hoof.  She does look like she is walking better since we are getting it under control.  She is 4 years old and I have own her for 2 years.  any suggestions on fixing flare?

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Not all horses have perfectly straight legs. Some are just a bit out of line, and you get things like that. Stay after it and it may improve by the time she's done growing. You may just need to rasp those areas more often than your usual trims.

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ok.  I will try to post pictures.  My internet is slow so it won't let me now.   I hope it works out good.  We have been trimming every 6 weeks.

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In between trims, if you notice the flare getting a head start again, just take it back down with a rasp. I bet your farrier will be happy to show you how. Touching it up every 3 weeks is not too much.

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I agree with Ozland. If the trim does not balance to the run of her bone, then there will be an argument going on between them.

 

Depending on the type of flare, one of the things I check is lateral/medial balance. These are a few of the situations I have run into:

 

If the flare is evenly around the hoof, then its probably balanced and managed by disengaging it from the ground.....and maintaining it.

 

I have a horse that is long transitioned, but has never lost the nickname of "flarey boy".

 

If there is medial/lateral imbalance going on, then the flare will be more on the outside, but make no mistake, the inside is flared as well, just differently.  A higher inside will either force the horse over onto the outside or hurt and have him avoid it to land on the outside. (whatever the situation) The outside in is the brunt of it. The imbalance distorts the shape of the flare and the shape of the foot. Inside high, heel taller and pulled more forward of the frog than the other. Tall/straight, thin, but strong wall on the inside, cleft deeper on the inside frog, and frog also looking like a jet banking on a turn to the left, inside breakover moves to 11 o'clock, instead of 10, while frog rotates away from 12 o'clock, going in the opposite direction...the outside is a long swoosh of extended roundness, but will have concavity and better development because it's being used more, but make no mistake though, the outside bone wing is closer to the ground than the inside This is the argument. It's a set up that promotes a pidgeon-toed placement and once you recognize it, you'll realize that it's quite common. If you put a rock under your own inside foot and walk pidgeon-toed, then you'll get the idea of it. In more extreme cases I get the feeling that the hoof is curling around that high/jamming inside wall...a shape to avoid pain.

 

Maybe it's a simply side-to-side imbalance. Here, in the extreme imbalance, the inside totally dominates so highly, that instead of the force flaring the outside wall, the force comes back to crush inward on the wall. (over tipped) This can happen on either side.

 

Bottom line is that if the trim does not mimic the run of "her" bone, then there will an argument and the flare shape will show it. You can bevel till the cows come home. The balance must be right for her. Then she is free to laugh in the face of it, even if she always tends to be that way. Do get the hooves cleaned up and take pictures? They are worth a thousand words, be able to have new eyes at the barn and a better conversation with the farrier.  

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