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Cactus Rose

Youtube Video

Where does this look like it's coming from?   1 member has voted

  1. 1. Been quite some time that I posted a topic on here.      Yes this gal has had the horse looked at by chiropractor and horse massage people on a regular basis.   The jury is out far as to exactly where the problem stems from.....in part because the problem goes away, or at least isn't visible for a period of time (doesn't appear to be related to how much work persay) - but then poof - there the dang thing is again !!!

    • Back
    • Hip
      0
    • Hock
      0
    • Stifle
      0
    • Foot
      0

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19 posts in this topic

If you've had a similar problem - if you've seen other horses with this issue - if you have any suggestions, it would be appreciated.

https://youtu.be/57U4lPFUPtU

Edited by Cactus Rose

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Watch the back edge of the saddle. Also note how short-strided it is behind. Take a real good look and you will see the horse is hollow-backed, uncollected, making the back weak. The spine is taking a pounding there.

Edited by noponies

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Thank you so much for replying NP.     

I'm going to play devil's advocate here and ask if you notice any favoring of any of the legs front or rear?   Because this short stridedness is more an EFFECT.........rather than cause.......of something that isn't quite right in one of the areas in the poll above.    

All opinions are very welcomed.

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Hard to really tell, but the right rear seems a bit off. But a lot of the short stride is due to the hollow back. Horse can't reach under

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You have brought up something that we just might consider the other way around NP.    The back pain is the more demonstrative and tends to be the focus - however it might be secondary and caused by improper movement from down below.   Because believe me - this horse knows how to round up and move properly...........when she's not in pain.    

 

Edited by Cactus Rose

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Thank you Jubal.    We are starting to wonder if in fact it IS a hock issue - but the back sensitivity is starting to get all the attention.

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Again, look really close at what the back of the saddle is doing to the spine. Have you tried a different saddle for a period of time? One with wider skirts?

Edited by noponies

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The skirting isn't too long for her back...........there's no white marks on the withers........I dunno........from what I've seen the saddle fits her quite well.   But I tell ya - watching the vid again........(cringe).....man alive she is moving like the letter "U".

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No, it isn't too long. You have, in fact, the opposite problem. That short round back is digging the spine with almost every step. Needs a square skirt just a bit longer for better support.

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Ahhh - I see what you mean.     I will pass the comments on.......thank you.    (The grey horse in the vid is mine - the mare with the issues belongs to a friend).     

* * * * *

In discussion with a vet right now about possible hock x-rays.

 

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you've had several opinions,  what i see is the horse completely blocked in the scapula, therefore tiptoeing in front, different horse in back.  saddle needs to move back off the shoulder blade so she can move out.  imagine you want to run a marathon and your shoes pinch your toes.

 take a piece of chalk and trace her shoulder blade, lift her foreleg up and observe the backward rotation, normally 15,17 inches at a healthy trot.  she's balking with every stride in FRONT.  the saddle needs to move back.  she is long enough for that. 

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You could solve the saddle question by switching to a bareback pad when she's off. See if that solves the problem.

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Does she have this issue when she's lunged without tack on her "off" days? She seems to me, sore in the hocks which is causing tightness in the hips/back, and maybe sore in the front as well. I'd have a full lameness exam done on this mare. Start low (feet) and work your way up. I think you'll be surprised what you find.

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UPDATE:

The horse was moved to a different boarding place.   The feed was improved 300 percent.   She is getting adjustments.........or......what the heck would a person call this thing.......hmmm.......because as I understand it "energy" redistribution is involved.

What can I say. 

(shrug)

The horse is moving a crapload better.   Videos will follow.

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And had you said proper feeding was a problem, I would have considered the beginnings of ulcers to be a real possibility. Horses do move funny when the belly hurts.

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It was only when the gal sent me a pic of the horse that I was a bit shocked that she had lost weight.    There is no doubt this horse is a hard keeper - but the poor low quality grass hay she was getting before didn't help whatever else is going on.

Where she is now she gets a grass alfalfa mix - and the owner of the place - an actual HORSE person - checks her daily and gives her a chiro/massage adjustment as needed.

* * * *

The owner of the horse is ALSO giving her some sort of herb thing JUST IN CASE.........ulcers are in there causing some issues as well N.P.

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Hey CR, did you post another video or just the one? I'd be curious to know if it was ulcers. Does the mare have any issues with her rear legs being picked up?

The gelding in with Sage has a similar gait issue. However, a few years back he was bit by a copperhead in the flank. He got pretty stiff in the hind quarters. He is now on an anti-inflammatory daily which has helped a lot. I've never had a horse with ulcers but now I've got something to read up on.

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