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OCD in Yearling

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Does anyone have experience with OCD in Yearlings. I bought a starved weanling in October. I brought her home and started feeding her 4X a day. I have experience in feeding, I do feed high protein and watch closely for epithisitis and such related problems. Well this little girl started putting on weight and looking better(not great) and she became lame in the right hind hock. I took her and had xrays done of both hocks and stifles. The stifle xrays did not turn out well enough to read. The left hock and the right hock show nothing. Vet suggested stall rest. Well a month of stall rest and somedays she is sound and other days she holds up her right hind and turns her head. After a few minutes she puts it down and is very lame then she is sound. This is repeated several times. I started her on Adequan, but can not find any info on wether this will help with OCD. I am guessing. Please help with any suggestions. I am waiting to contact another vet about a flouriscope(sp). This filly is gorgeous and we would really like to show her but she has to be sound.

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Does anyone have experience with OCD in Yearlings. I bought a starved weanling in October. I brought her home and started feeding her 4X a day. I have experience in feeding, I do feed high protein and watch closely for epithisitis and such related problems. Well this little girl started putting on weight and looking better(not great) and she became lame in the right hind hock. I took her and had xrays done of both hocks and stifles. The stifle xrays did not turn out well enough to read. The left hock and the right hock show nothing. Vet suggested stall rest. Well a month of stall rest and somedays she is sound and other days she holds up her right hind and turns her head. After a few minutes she puts it down and is very lame then she is sound. This is repeated several times. I started her on Adequan, but can not find any info on wether this will help with OCD. I am guessing. Please help with any suggestions. I am waiting to contact another vet about a flouriscope(sp). This filly is gorgeous and we would really like to show her but she has to be sound.

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Fast growing breeds are susceptable to OCD also high caloric, calcium, phosphorus diets contribute as well as. We've been breeding for years and I actually like to have mine grow at a very slow rate as mine will usually go on and do reining and cutting and work very hard. We don't feed anymore than 12% protein and when they hit yearling I cut it back to 10%. Mine don't finish growing until 3 or 4 years old and sometimes 5. They also say it can be heretitary but not a proven fact yet.

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Fast growing breeds are susceptable to OCD also high caloric, calcium, phosphorus diets contribute as well as. We've been breeding for years and I actually like to have mine grow at a very slow rate as mine will usually go on and do reining and cutting and work very hard. We don't feed anymore than 12% protein and when they hit yearling I cut it back to 10%. Mine don't finish growing until 3 or 4 years old and sometimes 5. They also say it can be heretitary but not a proven fact yet.

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I had one with OCD's and so did my parents. I would be taking her (and the xrays) to a qualified hospital (such as a college). If you have OCD's, they would show up on the xrays. The only thing to do to cure them is to get rid of them. It happens bascially because the ends on the bones are cartilage in babies. As they grow, it changes to bone. OCD'd occur when the cartilage doesn't change right therefore leaving lesions. That is a pretty crud explination but I think you get the point. The lesions have to come out so the body can then heal itself.

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I had one with OCD's and so did my parents. I would be taking her (and the xrays) to a qualified hospital (such as a college). If you have OCD's, they would show up on the xrays. The only thing to do to cure them is to get rid of them. It happens bascially because the ends on the bones are cartilage in babies. As they grow, it changes to bone. OCD'd occur when the cartilage doesn't change right therefore leaving lesions. That is a pretty crud explination but I think you get the point. The lesions have to come out so the body can then heal itself.

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The only thing that showed up on the xrays was a grey spot. The vet said it did not look like OCD but nothing really showed up. Were your OCD horses lame all the time or sound then lame then sound. I mean you can snap your fingers and she is sound or lame. I have had TB and raised paints/pintos for several years and never had anything like it. Even had the blacksmith look at the hoof. NOTHING. I am pulling my hair out.

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The only thing that showed up on the xrays was a grey spot. The vet said it did not look like OCD but nothing really showed up. Were your OCD horses lame all the time or sound then lame then sound. I mean you can snap your fingers and she is sound or lame. I have had TB and raised paints/pintos for several years and never had anything like it. Even had the blacksmith look at the hoof. NOTHING. I am pulling my hair out.

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Its very hard to get stifle x-rays in the field. If there is an equine clinic or hospital their xray machine will be wall mounted and be better for those types of radiographs. I had clients with horses that had OCD and several at the equine center I work at come in for surgery and most had good prognosis to go back to work. Good luck. I'm also assuming its not an abcess in the hoof. I had one of those at it was off and on (very deep abcess) and finally came out.

I also had a yearling filly that was off and on, had xrays done and only found a spot on the navicular bone in the hind foot. After 6 weeks stall rest she was totally fine and 100% sound and showing reining. Good luck and I hope its nothing serious.

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Its very hard to get stifle x-rays in the field. If there is an equine clinic or hospital their xray machine will be wall mounted and be better for those types of radiographs. I had clients with horses that had OCD and several at the equine center I work at come in for surgery and most had good prognosis to go back to work. Good luck. I'm also assuming its not an abcess in the hoof. I had one of those at it was off and on (very deep abcess) and finally came out.

I also had a yearling filly that was off and on, had xrays done and only found a spot on the navicular bone in the hind foot. After 6 weeks stall rest she was totally fine and 100% sound and showing reining. Good luck and I hope its nothing serious.

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Well, I am not sure about the x-rays. But if she is experiencing a growth problems, and you are feeding her a balanced diet, then I am guessing the problem is the way you switched her diet.

In feeding young horses, the most dangerous period is when switching growth tracks, from a slow or moderate growth track to a fast growth track. When we get colts in that have been out on range pasture with no supplemental feeding, we take about five months to slowly work up to a full feeding regime. It takes longer to get them looking good, but it is much safer. The most important thing is to avoid steep rises in the growth curve.

Beyond that, you have to look at what you are feeding -avoid high sugar and carb feeds, don't get too much protien (yearling should have about 14% in the total diet, so if you are feeding alfalfa you don't need a high protien grain.) And make sure you don't have a Ca:P imbalance.

Since your filly is already having problems, I would back off on the fitting at least until she is sound. Maybe turn her out for a couple of months, so she can get plenty of exercise, and give her a high fat, low carb feed with a good grass hay. A ration balancer, like Buckeye Gro'N'Win, Progressive's ProAdvantage Grass balancer or Hi-fat grass balancer or LMF Super Supplement might be a good idea -those contain all the protein and minerals she needs but very little carbs. You can feed with oats, but in your case I would just geed the balancer and hay until she is sound again.

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Well, I am not sure about the x-rays. But if she is experiencing a growth problems, and you are feeding her a balanced diet, then I am guessing the problem is the way you switched her diet.

In feeding young horses, the most dangerous period is when switching growth tracks, from a slow or moderate growth track to a fast growth track. When we get colts in that have been out on range pasture with no supplemental feeding, we take about five months to slowly work up to a full feeding regime. It takes longer to get them looking good, but it is much safer. The most important thing is to avoid steep rises in the growth curve.

Beyond that, you have to look at what you are feeding -avoid high sugar and carb feeds, don't get too much protien (yearling should have about 14% in the total diet, so if you are feeding alfalfa you don't need a high protien grain.) And make sure you don't have a Ca:P imbalance.

Since your filly is already having problems, I would back off on the fitting at least until she is sound. Maybe turn her out for a couple of months, so she can get plenty of exercise, and give her a high fat, low carb feed with a good grass hay. A ration balancer, like Buckeye Gro'N'Win, Progressive's ProAdvantage Grass balancer or Hi-fat grass balancer or LMF Super Supplement might be a good idea -those contain all the protein and minerals she needs but very little carbs. You can feed with oats, but in your case I would just geed the balancer and hay until she is sound again.

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There is no fitting to her right now. BUT I would like her to be sound before she is turned out for any length of time. I turned her out today for the first time in a month. SHE WAS SOUND! Who knows. She can become unmovable in a snap of the fingers.

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There is no fitting to her right now. BUT I would like her to be sound before she is turned out for any length of time. I turned her out today for the first time in a month. SHE WAS SOUND! Who knows. She can become unmovable in a snap of the fingers.

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I turned her out for 10 min. I am feeding her Gro N Win and Oats she is getting a 1/2 flake of 2nd cutting hay. I do not believe this lameness has anything to do with feeding. There is heat in the hock but now no fluid. I have never dealt with OCD but I find it hard to believe they can be totally unsound and then totally sound within minutes.

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I turned her out for 10 min. I am feeding her Gro N Win and Oats she is getting a 1/2 flake of 2nd cutting hay. I do not believe this lameness has anything to do with feeding. There is heat in the hock but now no fluid. I have never dealt with OCD but I find it hard to believe they can be totally unsound and then totally sound within minutes.

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Here is an artical I found I thought you might like to read.

Osteochondrosis - OCD

What is osteochondrosis (OCD)?

Etiology of osteochondrosis

Symptoms/diagnosis of osteochondrosis

Risk factors for osteochondrosis

Treatment options

If surgery is required

Equine health options

What is osteochondrosis (OCD)?

Osteochondrosis is a form of developmental orthopedic disease that involves a local or generalized failure of endochondral ossification affecting the epiphyseal and/or metaphyseal cartilage. Two clinical syndromes affect horses:

osteochondrosis dessicans (OCD)

subchondral cyst-like lesions (bone cysts)

Etiology of osteochondrosis

Endochondral ossification occurs in the bones of the extremities, the vertebral column, pelvis, and base of the skull. Bone is formed from a hyaline cartilage matrix, which becomes ossified.

Several steps are involved in normal endochondral ossification:

First, chondrocytes mature and enlarge

The intracellular matrix begins to thin

The mature chondrocyte produces alkaline phosphatase. This causes the intracellular matrix to calcify

Calcification of the matrix in turn causes the chondrocytes to die.

Vascular penetration of the area then occurs and osteoblasts within the matrix produce bone, which matures to lamellar bone.

Osteochondrosis develops when:

Cartilage cells that have proliferated in a normal manner, mature and differentiate abnormally.

Failure of the cartilage matrix to calcify or failure of vascular penetration and osseous replacement causes the cartilage to thicken.

Due to the lack of nutritional elements, necrosis develops in the deeper layers, giving rise to fissures.

Eventually, a cartilagenous flap (OCD) develops.

Sometimes, the thickened cartilage persists without developing fissures and becomes surrounded by subchondral bone. Adjacent normal cartilage continues its endochondral ossification and the retained cartilage dies. This results in a subchondral cyst-like lesion.

Osteochondrosis frequently leads to arthritis.

Symptoms/diagnosis of osteochondrosis

The symptoms of osteochondrosis depend on the area that is affected by the condition. Stiffness, lameness and pain in the affected joint are common signs that a horse may have developed the disease. (Unlike other animals, a horse with osteochondrosis does not always experience pain.)

The horse may try to compensate for the lameness by restricting movement of the affected joint. If the leg is affected, the horse may swing its leg outward in a circular motion to avoid bending the leg. Although the condition usually affects both sides, one leg is often worse than the other. The horse may therefore take extra weight on the better leg, resulting in decreased muscle development in the other leg affected by osteochondrosis.

Risk factors for osteochondrosis in horses

Genetic influences, overweight, prolonged inactivity/intense activity and improper shoeing are all believed to contribute towards the likelihood of developing osteochondrosis.

Genetic influences

The tendency to develop osteochondrosis is inherited, with larger, fast-growing breeds of horse being more likely to develop the condition. However, not all horses whose parents have the condition will develop it themselves.

Dietary influences

Excess intake of calories, phosphorous and calcium is believed to play a part in the onset of osteochondrosis in susceptible horses. Slowing the rate of growth of large breeds of horses has been shown to reduce the incidence of osteochondrosis.

Exercise

Osteochondrosis develops as a consequence of defective transformation of cartilage into bone. If a young horse overuses a joint affected by osteochondrosis, defective cartilage can separate from the bone to which it is attached. Separation of cartilage from bone causes pain and joint instability and initiates the development of secondary arthritis. (Many arthritic changes, such as bone spur formation, develop when the horse?s body attempts to stabilize the joint by adding "wedges? of bone.) By restricting the amount and intensity of the horse's exercise, osteochondrosis is less likely to occur.

Improper shoeing

Improper shoeing can cause many joint and muscle problems and is a significant factor in the progression of degenerative disease. An experienced farrier will be able to ensure a horse is shoed correctly.

Treatment options for osteochondrosis

The treatment for osteochondrosis is geared towards inhibiting further breakdown of the joint cartilage and bone and decreasing the pain the horse may be experiencing. Various drug therapies and surgical treatments can ease discomfort and restore mobility.

The type of treatment depends upon several factors, such as the age of the horse, the severity of the problem and financial considerations. Management of the condition usually consists of exercise restriction, body weight management and symptomatic pain management with analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs.

Exercise Control

Restricting the amount and intensity of a horse's activity has been shown to reduce the incidence of osteochondrosis. Flaps of cartilage that have not yet broken away from their underlying bone may heal back if the affected joint use is not too intense or prolonged. Horses should participate in only regular short walks until they have finished growing. This recommendation is particularly important if the horse already has osteochondrosis.

Dietary Restriction

Overfeeding contributes significantly to the development of many orthopedic conditions in horses, including osteochondrosis. The horse?s total caloric intake should be reduced and vitamin/nutritional supplements reduced unless specifically indicated.

Analgesic and anti-inflammatory medications

These should only be used for the short term, when necessary to encourage movement. Commonly used analgesics and anti-inflammatories include acetaminophen and various NSAIDs.

Acetaminophen

For mild to moderate osteochondrosis in horses, acetaminophen (Tylenol?, Panadol?, Exdol?, etc.) may be prescribed to relieve pain.

NSAIDs

NSAIDs help reduce pain and swelling of the joints and decrease stiffness. When taken at a low dose, NSAIDs reduce pain; when taken at a higher dose, NSAIDs can also reduce inflammation. NSAIDs do not prevent joint damage and when used over the long-term, may accelerate joint breakdown. Taking more than one NSAID at a time increases the possibility of severe side effects such as ulcers and bleeding. The newer sub-class of NSAIDs (used currently for companion animals), known as Cox-2 Inhibitors, includes Rimadyl? (carprofen), Metacam? (meloxicam) and Etogesic? (etodolac).

Cortisone

When pain and inflammation is severe, a corticosteroid, such as cortisone, may be injected directly into the affected joint/s. An injection can provide almost immediate relief for a tender, swollen and inflamed joint.

PENTOSAN POLYSULPHATE

Pentosan polysulphate (Cartrophen Vet?) is an injectable drug is given at weekly intervals, usually on four separate occasions. The drug acts in many different ways, but primarily improves the environment of the joint cartilage. Painkillers are contraindicated while pentosan polysulphate is being administered.

VISCO-SUPPLEMENTATION

Visco-supplementation is the process of injecting a gel-like substance into the joint. This substance lubricates the cartilage, reducing pain and improving flexibility. Visco-supplementation decreases friction within the joint, thus reducing pain and allowing greater mobility. This method of treatment requires ongoing injections as benefits are only temporary. Substances used in visco-supplementation include hyaluronic acid, or HA (Legend?, Hylartin? and Synacid?), and poly-sulfated glycosaminoglycans (PSGAGS) such as Adequan?.

If surgery is required

A number of surgical techniques are employed in the treatment of osteochondrosis. The goal of the surgical procedure is to remove any loose pieces of cartilage from the joint surface and curette (scrape) the cartilage defect to encourage the body to refill the dessicated areas. Surgery should always be considered a last resort, when all other attempts to help the condition have failed.

In some very young horses, the cartilaginous flap associated with osteochondrosis may heal on its own. It is therefore worth waiting to see if the lameness resolves itself spontaneously. Surgery should not be delayed too long, however, if the horse continues to exhibit lameness.

Equine health options

Recovery-EQ?

Recovery-EQ? with Nutricol?, is a proprietary lifestyle supplement that can enhance your horse?s quality of life.* Recovery-EQ? has been developed to improve circulation to tissues, speed repair and slow or halt tissue damage. It may be used on its own or in combination with prescribed medications. See the October, November and December 2003 reviews of Recovery-EQ? in the prestigious Horse Journal

"Best performer overall in our latest joint supplement trial, even helped with back pain. Good choice for the tough case not responding well to other products." Horse Journal December 2003

Disclaimer

* Under current legislation, Biomedica is not permitted to make claims in support of health benefits derived from natural formulations. This means we cannot make specific statements as to how Recovery-eq? itself may help your horse overcome the pain and inflammation associated with degenerative diseases. Giving your horse Recovery-eq? should be a decision based on personal research and understanding of the role food-derived antioxidants and enzymes play in health and wellbeing.

The information provided within this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from a veterinarian or other health care professional, and should not be used for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. A health care professional should be consulted before starting any diet or supplementation program, before administering any medication, or if your horse has a health problem. Do not discontinue any other medical treatments without first consulting your health care professional.

Copyright ?2001 Biomedica Laboratories Inc. Disclaimer Site Map Site Design: Planet Grafix

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Here is an artical I found I thought you might like to read.

Osteochondrosis - OCD

What is osteochondrosis (OCD)?

Etiology of osteochondrosis

Symptoms/diagnosis of osteochondrosis

Risk factors for osteochondrosis

Treatment options

If surgery is required

Equine health options

What is osteochondrosis (OCD)?

Osteochondrosis is a form of developmental orthopedic disease that involves a local or generalized failure of endochondral ossification affecting the epiphyseal and/or metaphyseal cartilage. Two clinical syndromes affect horses:

osteochondrosis dessicans (OCD)

subchondral cyst-like lesions (bone cysts)

Etiology of osteochondrosis

Endochondral ossification occurs in the bones of the extremities, the vertebral column, pelvis, and base of the skull. Bone is formed from a hyaline cartilage matrix, which becomes ossified.

Several steps are involved in normal endochondral ossification:

First, chondrocytes mature and enlarge

The intracellular matrix begins to thin

The mature chondrocyte produces alkaline phosphatase. This causes the intracellular matrix to calcify

Calcification of the matrix in turn causes the chondrocytes to die.

Vascular penetration of the area then occurs and osteoblasts within the matrix produce bone, which matures to lamellar bone.

Osteochondrosis develops when:

Cartilage cells that have proliferated in a normal manner, mature and differentiate abnormally.

Failure of the cartilage matrix to calcify or failure of vascular penetration and osseous replacement causes the cartilage to thicken.

Due to the lack of nutritional elements, necrosis develops in the deeper layers, giving rise to fissures.

Eventually, a cartilagenous flap (OCD) develops.

Sometimes, the thickened cartilage persists without developing fissures and becomes surrounded by subchondral bone. Adjacent normal cartilage continues its endochondral ossification and the retained cartilage dies. This results in a subchondral cyst-like lesion.

Osteochondrosis frequently leads to arthritis.

Symptoms/diagnosis of osteochondrosis

The symptoms of osteochondrosis depend on the area that is affected by the condition. Stiffness, lameness and pain in the affected joint are common signs that a horse may have developed the disease. (Unlike other animals, a horse with osteochondrosis does not always experience pain.)

The horse may try to compensate for the lameness by restricting movement of the affected joint. If the leg is affected, the horse may swing its leg outward in a circular motion to avoid bending the leg. Although the condition usually affects both sides, one leg is often worse than the other. The horse may therefore take extra weight on the better leg, resulting in decreased muscle development in the other leg affected by osteochondrosis.

Risk factors for osteochondrosis in horses

Genetic influences, overweight, prolonged inactivity/intense activity and improper shoeing are all believed to contribute towards the likelihood of developing osteochondrosis.

Genetic influences

The tendency to develop osteochondrosis is inherited, with larger, fast-growing breeds of horse being more likely to develop the condition. However, not all horses whose parents have the condition will develop it themselves.

Dietary influences

Excess intake of calories, phosphorous and calcium is believed to play a part in the onset of osteochondrosis in susceptible horses. Slowing the rate of growth of large breeds of horses has been shown to reduce the incidence of osteochondrosis.

Exercise

Osteochondrosis develops as a consequence of defective transformation of cartilage into bone. If a young horse overuses a joint affected by osteochondrosis, defective cartilage can separate from the bone to which it is attached. Separation of cartilage from bone causes pain and joint instability and initiates the development of secondary arthritis. (Many arthritic changes, such as bone spur formation, develop when the horse?s body attempts to stabilize the joint by adding "wedges? of bone.) By restricting the amount and intensity of the horse's exercise, osteochondrosis is less likely to occur.

Improper shoeing

Improper shoeing can cause many joint and muscle problems and is a significant factor in the progression of degenerative disease. An experienced farrier will be able to ensure a horse is shoed correctly.

Treatment options for osteochondrosis

The treatment for osteochondrosis is geared towards inhibiting further breakdown of the joint cartilage and bone and decreasing the pain the horse may be experiencing. Various drug therapies and surgical treatments can ease discomfort and restore mobility.

The type of treatment depends upon several factors, such as the age of the horse, the severity of the problem and financial considerations. Management of the condition usually consists of exercise restriction, body weight management and symptomatic pain management with analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs.

Exercise Control

Restricting the amount and intensity of a horse's activity has been shown to reduce the incidence of osteochondrosis. Flaps of cartilage that have not yet broken away from their underlying bone may heal back if the affected joint use is not too intense or prolonged. Horses should participate in only regular short walks until they have finished growing. This recommendation is particularly important if the horse already has osteochondrosis.

Dietary Restriction

Overfeeding contributes significantly to the development of many orthopedic conditions in horses, including osteochondrosis. The horse?s total caloric intake should be reduced and vitamin/nutritional supplements reduced unless specifically indicated.

Analgesic and anti-inflammatory medications

These should only be used for the short term, when necessary to encourage movement. Commonly used analgesics and anti-inflammatories include acetaminophen and various NSAIDs.

Acetaminophen

For mild to moderate osteochondrosis in horses, acetaminophen (Tylenol?, Panadol?, Exdol?, etc.) may be prescribed to relieve pain.

NSAIDs

NSAIDs help reduce pain and swelling of the joints and decrease stiffness. When taken at a low dose, NSAIDs reduce pain; when taken at a higher dose, NSAIDs can also reduce inflammation. NSAIDs do not prevent joint damage and when used over the long-term, may accelerate joint breakdown. Taking more than one NSAID at a time increases the possibility of severe side effects such as ulcers and bleeding. The newer sub-class of NSAIDs (used currently for companion animals), known as Cox-2 Inhibitors, includes Rimadyl? (carprofen), Metacam? (meloxicam) and Etogesic? (etodolac).

Cortisone

When pain and inflammation is severe, a corticosteroid, such as cortisone, may be injected directly into the affected joint/s. An injection can provide almost immediate relief for a tender, swollen and inflamed joint.

PENTOSAN POLYSULPHATE

Pentosan polysulphate (Cartrophen Vet?) is an injectable drug is given at weekly intervals, usually on four separate occasions. The drug acts in many different ways, but primarily improves the environment of the joint cartilage. Painkillers are contraindicated while pentosan polysulphate is being administered.

VISCO-SUPPLEMENTATION

Visco-supplementation is the process of injecting a gel-like substance into the joint. This substance lubricates the cartilage, reducing pain and improving flexibility. Visco-supplementation decreases friction within the joint, thus reducing pain and allowing greater mobility. This method of treatment requires ongoing injections as benefits are only temporary. Substances used in visco-supplementation include hyaluronic acid, or HA (Legend?, Hylartin? and Synacid?), and poly-sulfated glycosaminoglycans (PSGAGS) such as Adequan?.

If surgery is required

A number of surgical techniques are employed in the treatment of osteochondrosis. The goal of the surgical procedure is to remove any loose pieces of cartilage from the joint surface and curette (scrape) the cartilage defect to encourage the body to refill the dessicated areas. Surgery should always be considered a last resort, when all other attempts to help the condition have failed.

In some very young horses, the cartilaginous flap associated with osteochondrosis may heal on its own. It is therefore worth waiting to see if the lameness resolves itself spontaneously. Surgery should not be delayed too long, however, if the horse continues to exhibit lameness.

Equine health options

Recovery-EQ?

Recovery-EQ? with Nutricol?, is a proprietary lifestyle supplement that can enhance your horse?s quality of life.* Recovery-EQ? has been developed to improve circulation to tissues, speed repair and slow or halt tissue damage. It may be used on its own or in combination with prescribed medications. See the October, November and December 2003 reviews of Recovery-EQ? in the prestigious Horse Journal

"Best performer overall in our latest joint supplement trial, even helped with back pain. Good choice for the tough case not responding well to other products." Horse Journal December 2003

Disclaimer

* Under current legislation, Biomedica is not permitted to make claims in support of health benefits derived from natural formulations. This means we cannot make specific statements as to how Recovery-eq? itself may help your horse overcome the pain and inflammation associated with degenerative diseases. Giving your horse Recovery-eq? should be a decision based on personal research and understanding of the role food-derived antioxidants and enzymes play in health and wellbeing.

The information provided within this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from a veterinarian or other health care professional, and should not be used for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. A health care professional should be consulted before starting any diet or supplementation program, before administering any medication, or if your horse has a health problem. Do not discontinue any other medical treatments without first consulting your health care professional.

Copyright ?2001 Biomedica Laboratories Inc. Disclaimer Site Map Site Design: Planet Grafix

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