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Hogged Back Filly

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I am possibly going to look at a Palomino Paint filly that has a hog back. The owner says that it is a Congenital Defect and not genetic. Is this true? Also what will happen over time with her body. Will she be rideable or just a brood mare/ Pasture horse?

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I am possibly going to look at a Palomino Paint filly that has a hog back. The owner says that it is a Congenital Defect and not genetic. Is this true? Also what will happen over time with her body. Will she be rideable or just a brood mare/ Pasture horse?

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.....I wasn't sure what that was either. The only thing I can find on the net talks about a hog back jump....where the centre rail is the highest part of it.

That being said, I'm guessing it means the spine is the highest point of the back with the ribs and musculature dropping away from that point.....

[Question]

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.....I wasn't sure what that was either. The only thing I can find on the net talks about a hog back jump....where the centre rail is the highest part of it.

That being said, I'm guessing it means the spine is the highest point of the back with the ribs and musculature dropping away from that point.....

[Question]

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A hog backed horse is one that has a rounded back with the same profile as a hog. There will be a little dip behind the withers and then the horse's back will have a 'hump' that goes from there to their tail.

I have never seen one that rode well at all and I have seen people try. There is just no place for the saddle to set and they are always uncomfortable with one. They are totally useless in my book. I connot say as to genetic ties, but I would never want to breed one. There are too many good horses without huge comformation faults to waste time and money on a freak of nature or a genetic wreck.

[ 03-22-2006, 11:47 AM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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A hog backed horse is one that has a rounded back with the same profile as a hog. There will be a little dip behind the withers and then the horse's back will have a 'hump' that goes from there to their tail.

I have never seen one that rode well at all and I have seen people try. There is just no place for the saddle to set and they are always uncomfortable with one. They are totally useless in my book. I connot say as to genetic ties, but I would never want to breed one. There are too many good horses without huge comformation faults to waste time and money on a freak of nature or a genetic wreck.

[ 03-22-2006, 11:47 AM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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DItto to Cheri! WHy breed something that is less then perfect. Do your self a favor and dont give a second thought to this horse. We need to start being more responsible and not even think about breeding poor quality horses.

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DItto to Cheri! WHy breed something that is less then perfect. Do your self a favor and dont give a second thought to this horse. We need to start being more responsible and not even think about breeding poor quality horses.

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I was interested in her ad until the lady showed me her pictures then she told me of the defect. She wants $1800 for her, but I said No. She should have been more honest in her ad.

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I was interested in her ad until the lady showed me her pictures then she told me of the defect. She wants $1800 for her, but I said No. She should have been more honest in her ad.

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$1800.00? The ones I have seen (some were very well bred) sold by the pound. The're in Europe now. Gives you an idea of what there worth here.

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$1800.00? The ones I have seen (some were very well bred) sold by the pound. The're in Europe now. Gives you an idea of what there worth here.

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I do not chimme in often, I just read, but everyone of GOD's creature is worth something, even if nothing more than a grass mower.

I would agree the horse would not be worth $1800, but it is still a living creature.

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I do not chimme in often, I just read, but everyone of GOD's creature is worth something, even if nothing more than a grass mower.

I would agree the horse would not be worth $1800, but it is still a living creature.

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Buy it then pansimba! Do you make it a point to go to the auction and buy slaughter bound horses?

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Buy it then pansimba! Do you make it a point to go to the auction and buy slaughter bound horses?

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No, I can not run to every auction in the world and buy all the poor mistreated animals. I have 3 horse that came to me in bad shape from neglect cases and they have made great mounts and friends. I also have 3 cats and 3 dogs that were thrown out. I do my share to help neglected animals.

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No, I can not run to every auction in the world and buy all the poor mistreated animals. I have 3 horse that came to me in bad shape from neglect cases and they have made great mounts and friends. I also have 3 cats and 3 dogs that were thrown out. I do my share to help neglected animals.

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There is a vast difference from 'saving' useful, ridable thin and neglected horses. That is not saving a horse in my book -- it is just good business. 'Saving' a horse is buying a slaughter bound 'useless' non-ridable horse that can only be a 'yard ornament' and a feed and doller burner. When you do that with regularity, you can criticize the people that take them to a sale, turn them into dollars and let the chips fall where they may.

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There is a vast difference from 'saving' useful, ridable thin and neglected horses. That is not saving a horse in my book -- it is just good business. 'Saving' a horse is buying a slaughter bound 'useless' non-ridable horse that can only be a 'yard ornament' and a feed and doller burner. When you do that with regularity, you can criticize the people that take them to a sale, turn them into dollars and let the chips fall where they may.

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I saw this post while researching a hog backed horse, as I wanted to find something I could share with a friend who has one. I just wanted to say that they are in fact NOT all useless.  I used to groom a thoroughbred named Tibbs Boy. I have three pictures of him winning races at Churchill downs in Lexington Kentucky.  Not some bush track in Mexico!  They actually have normal withers and center back. It's just over the kidney area where it almost appears to be an extra vertebrae. The loin area over the back, into the hip on to the rump, resemble that of a hog.  The roundness is smooth and not to be mistaken with a hunters bump. The two horses I was familiar with carried both a stock saddle and a jock saddle. Again, withers and back area just behind the withers were fine. Clearly I would not want to breed to one, but all the talk about being useless or dog food is just not accurate at all.  I would love to post a photo if I could, of one of his win pictures.  You can clearly see his hogged back.  You can also see the saddle and jock sitting on the horse just fine.

.  If ya run into one, don't write them off as everyone says......guess what, I think I can post photos. Notice the big round hump that starts just under the saddle towel and ties right on over into his rump......just like a pig.......but a pig, Tibbs was NOT!!!  Any questions?

 

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Edited by Terri morris
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why on earth does somebody bring this post up 10 years later??

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unless they are an irresponsible breeder or a hoarder?

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I think that is unfair to categorize someone that way.  Clearly, Terri explained they came across this topic while doing research and shared their personal experience with a hog-backed horse and wanted to say they are not all useless.

HOWEVER, I see by the dates on the photos that they were taken in 1979 and the horse market has changed dramatically since then, when even unusable horses had a market value.  We now have more good horses than there are homes for and people can be more selective (best conformation to use) about the horses they put their time and money into.  Today, I feel disadvantaged horses will only have a good life if a rescuer with a heart of gold and deep pockets comes along to save them because there are far more usable horses in need of good homes and their desirability will top one that cannot be used, barring those with the resources to keep a pasture ornament.

Edited by Heidi n Q
spelling

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On 1/4/2017 at 10:48 AM, nick said:

unless they are an irresponsible breeder or a hoarder?

DUH! Person clearly stated they wouldn't breed to one, and I'm pretty sure as a GROOM, he didn't own the horse and therefore could not be construed a hoarder either. Do you have ANYTHING but hot air between your ears?

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