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black tide

How do you remove ergots?

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I was just wondering how to remove ergots. My horse has them and they always creep me out. Is it easy to do?

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I was just wondering how to remove ergots. My horse has them and they always creep me out. Is it easy to do?

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I don't remove mine...but found this article...

http://www.hiway16.com/horse/Archive/2003May27.htm Full article is on the lower right of the page....here's an excerpt:

So how do you remove them then? Much like the extra hoof that the farrier trims off, the outer parts of the ergot and chestnut are not susceptible to bleeding. If they are very long, you can choose to trim off the main excess part at one time, and then slowly remove the rest so as to avoid getting too close to the skin at one time. This is similar to trimming a horse whose feet have been severely neglected - the farrier will trim less foot but make frequent visits.

If you are unsure about trimming long ergots or chestnuts yourself, ask your farrier if he or she will use the nippers to remove the excess. Once the main part is gone, you can peel away at them. If they are very hard and scaly, you can use baby oil or Vaseline to soften them. Most horse?s chestnuts are easily peelable if you keep on top of them - if you bathe your horse, pay attention to them right after the bath as they are soft and peel easily then.

Ergots, once soft, can even be cut with your scissors. Don?t cut too close up as it can feel uncomfortable for your horse when the scissors pinch down, but you can trim up fairly closely with the scissors if you take the time to round off the sharper corners and edges.

If you take a few minutes to peel the excess off on a regular basis, your horse?s legs will be left smooth and cleaner looking, with minimal effort!

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I don't remove mine...but found this article...

http://www.hiway16.com/horse/Archive/2003May27.htm Full article is on the lower right of the page....here's an excerpt:

So how do you remove them then? Much like the extra hoof that the farrier trims off, the outer parts of the ergot and chestnut are not susceptible to bleeding. If they are very long, you can choose to trim off the main excess part at one time, and then slowly remove the rest so as to avoid getting too close to the skin at one time. This is similar to trimming a horse whose feet have been severely neglected - the farrier will trim less foot but make frequent visits.

If you are unsure about trimming long ergots or chestnuts yourself, ask your farrier if he or she will use the nippers to remove the excess. Once the main part is gone, you can peel away at them. If they are very hard and scaly, you can use baby oil or Vaseline to soften them. Most horse?s chestnuts are easily peelable if you keep on top of them - if you bathe your horse, pay attention to them right after the bath as they are soft and peel easily then.

Ergots, once soft, can even be cut with your scissors. Don?t cut too close up as it can feel uncomfortable for your horse when the scissors pinch down, but you can trim up fairly closely with the scissors if you take the time to round off the sharper corners and edges.

If you take a few minutes to peel the excess off on a regular basis, your horse?s legs will be left smooth and cleaner looking, with minimal effort!

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quote:

Originally posted by Love2Slide:

I just twist them until they pop off. Generally they snap off fairly easy.
[Razz]

That's my technique too. Fortunately my guy seems to take care of that himself, I never notice them getting long (same with his chestnuts)

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quote:

Originally posted by Love2Slide:

I just twist them until they pop off. Generally they snap off fairly easy.
[Razz]

That's my technique too. Fortunately my guy seems to take care of that himself, I never notice them getting long (same with his chestnuts)

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Applying a litle mineral oil or vaseline 2-3 times a week will help thm flake off easier on their own. It will also help to peel them off when applied 30-45 minutes before cutting or peeling them. HTTY

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Applying a litle mineral oil or vaseline 2-3 times a week will help thm flake off easier on their own. It will also help to peel them off when applied 30-45 minutes before cutting or peeling them. HTTY

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