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cowgirlup23

sway back horse??*PICS*

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im trying to buy my first horse. i found one that i really really like. When i saw her she was underwieght and it looked like she had a sway back, the owner said it was just high withers. Shes a QH mare 13 years 15.3hh

Is there any way you could build muscle on her back so it doesnt look like a sway back. here is the link to all of her pictures.

http://pets.webshots.com/album/553971897cckKwT?start=0

[ 09-12-2006, 06:49 PM: Message edited by: Cutter_02 ]

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im trying to buy my first horse. i found one that i really really like. When i saw her she was underwieght and it looked like she had a sway back, the owner said it was just high withers. Shes a QH mare 13 years 15.3hh

Is there any way you could build muscle on her back so it doesnt look like a sway back. here is the link to all of her pictures.

http://pets.webshots.com/album/553971897cckKwT?start=0

[ 09-12-2006, 06:49 PM: Message edited by: Cutter_02 ]

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quote:

Originally posted by Cutter_02:

im trying to buy my first horse. i found one that i really really like. When i saw her she was underwieght and it looked like she had a sway back, the owner said it was just high withers. Shes a QH mare 13 years 15.3hh

Is there any way you could build muscle on her back so it doesnt look like a sway back. here is the link to all of her pictures.


high whithers my butt, ive seen high whithered horses that didnt look like that, i would pass i firmly believe she is sway back and i dont know of anything that will build up anything on there

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quote:

Originally posted by Cutter_02:

im trying to buy my first horse. i found one that i really really like. When i saw her she was underwieght and it looked like she had a sway back, the owner said it was just high withers. Shes a QH mare 13 years 15.3hh

Is there any way you could build muscle on her back so it doesnt look like a sway back. here is the link to all of her pictures.


high whithers my butt, ive seen high whithered horses that didnt look like that, i would pass i firmly believe she is sway back and i dont know of anything that will build up anything on there

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She is sway back, swayback horses are often weaker backed and can carry less weight. A heavy load can make the back worse. It puts more strain in the ligaments of the back. Saddle fit is very hard. Keep in mind that much of a horses power comes from the hind end. With a swayback horse much of that power is lost. They are more likely to a sore back.

Has she had many foals? Having lots of foals over and over can also cause swayback.

I would not suggest buying her.

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She is sway back, swayback horses are often weaker backed and can carry less weight. A heavy load can make the back worse. It puts more strain in the ligaments of the back. Saddle fit is very hard. Keep in mind that much of a horses power comes from the hind end. With a swayback horse much of that power is lost. They are more likely to a sore back.

Has she had many foals? Having lots of foals over and over can also cause swayback.

I would not suggest buying her.

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Conformation

here is a site that explains near the bottom about swayback how to tell if it is

a high withered horse

or if the horse actually has a weak back

or if the horse is just malnurished and skinny and needs more muscling

i like what the rest of the sitre tells to about when the bones of horse fuse and all the problems riding causes before they fuse .

hope it helps! [smiley Wavey]

[ 09-12-2006, 09:08 PM: Message edited by: Adrenalin_Girl ]

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Conformation

here is a site that explains near the bottom about swayback how to tell if it is

a high withered horse

or if the horse actually has a weak back

or if the horse is just malnurished and skinny and needs more muscling

i like what the rest of the sitre tells to about when the bones of horse fuse and all the problems riding causes before they fuse .

hope it helps! [smiley Wavey]

[ 09-12-2006, 09:08 PM: Message edited by: Adrenalin_Girl ]

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I know of one particular horse who has always been much more sway backed than the one pictured since a young age. He is nearing 20 years old now, still going strong and has won many hunter/jumper classes over fences and on the flat. So never say never. Do you like the way she goes when you ride her? Is she sound? Willing? She has no topline and incorrect muscle developement in the neck so she has obviously been ridden without any flexion at the poll and allowed to travel hollow and above the bit which is bad for any horse but worse for a horse with this type of conformation. Retraining her to move correctly will take time and an experienced rider but will absolutely help her. She will never be ideal. You have to take each horse as an individual. Her price should reflect her conformation defects.

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I know of one particular horse who has always been much more sway backed than the one pictured since a young age. He is nearing 20 years old now, still going strong and has won many hunter/jumper classes over fences and on the flat. So never say never. Do you like the way she goes when you ride her? Is she sound? Willing? She has no topline and incorrect muscle developement in the neck so she has obviously been ridden without any flexion at the poll and allowed to travel hollow and above the bit which is bad for any horse but worse for a horse with this type of conformation. Retraining her to move correctly will take time and an experienced rider but will absolutely help her. She will never be ideal. You have to take each horse as an individual. Her price should reflect her conformation defects.

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I tend to agree with lightness. I think she definatly has her confirmation faults--but don't we all...lol. While I do think this mare is sway-backed, I too have seen, and ridden worse. I also think she looks very sweet and as though she has been well cared for.

I think, if you really like this mare, you should have a vet check performed on her. Explain to your vet what your goals are for this mare. He/she would then be able to tell you if she is sound for what you want to do. She may never be a winner in the show ring, if that is what you are after, but she might make a perfect trail horse buddy.

I also agree with lightness that price should go into factor when looking at this mare. I wouldn't pay top-dollar for her, but she could still be a fun horse at the right price as long as she is sound and fit for what you want from her.

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I tend to agree with lightness. I think she definatly has her confirmation faults--but don't we all...lol. While I do think this mare is sway-backed, I too have seen, and ridden worse. I also think she looks very sweet and as though she has been well cared for.

I think, if you really like this mare, you should have a vet check performed on her. Explain to your vet what your goals are for this mare. He/she would then be able to tell you if she is sound for what you want to do. She may never be a winner in the show ring, if that is what you are after, but she might make a perfect trail horse buddy.

I also agree with lightness that price should go into factor when looking at this mare. I wouldn't pay top-dollar for her, but she could still be a fun horse at the right price as long as she is sound and fit for what you want from her.

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She looks sway backed to me. High withered horses do not have sway backs as a result of being high withered.

here is a pic of my 30 Yr Old OTTB who has high withers. She has arthritis and had been ridden hard all her life,..

-

Good luck!

Shelley

[ 09-12-2006, 11:33 PM: Message edited by: Shelley and Andy Carter ]

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She looks sway backed to me. High withered horses do not have sway backs as a result of being high withered.

here is a pic of my 30 Yr Old OTTB who has high withers. She has arthritis and had been ridden hard all her life,..

-

Good luck!

Shelley

[ 09-12-2006, 11:33 PM: Message edited by: Shelley and Andy Carter ]

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I would look at the horse and see if I liked it. I would not let the sway back be my decision maker. We have a 21 year old Quarter Horse mare that has roped and run barrels up until about a year ago (quit do to arthritis) and she is MUCH worse than this horse and has been that way her entire life. She has had several foals and it has NEVER bothered her. [Jump]

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I would look at the horse and see if I liked it. I would not let the sway back be my decision maker. We have a 21 year old Quarter Horse mare that has roped and run barrels up until about a year ago (quit do to arthritis) and she is MUCH worse than this horse and has been that way her entire life. She has had several foals and it has NEVER bothered her. [Jump]

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I've seen lots of fox hunters built that way and one that was really sway back and as long as he was padded up right he was fine, I would look at the horse and she if you match. Then I would have my vet look at her. I wouldn't pass just because of that.

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I've seen lots of fox hunters built that way and one that was really sway back and as long as he was padded up right he was fine, I would look at the horse and she if you match. Then I would have my vet look at her. I wouldn't pass just because of that.

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There are other conformation faults that I would pass her for, like her neck, the short pasterns, that may give you a rough ride, her big, roman nosed head and such.

But, if she rides well for you, has a very good mind and you both get along well, why let any fault bother you?

Just remember that, if she doesn't work well for you, the next buyer may take all that in consideration and she will be a little harder to sell than a better looking horse.

Swayback? That is way back in secondary place.

I also have known some terribly swaybacked horses, swayback called lordosis, that were great jumpers into their old age. They do require sometimes a double pad for English or a cut back, built up pad for western saddles.

That is what we use and works fine, since we have a 14 year old ranch horse that is swaybacked.

He is so sweet that no one notices. [big Grin]

As far as building her muscling, you can do that with long low work at first, then, once she has learned to carry herself less braced onto her front end, her neck will develop more on top, lose that U neck on the bottom part and that will be part of the results of her engaging her hind end more and that will--finally we get to it--lift her back some.

All that will be a great learning experience for you as a rider and very rewarding for you and the mare, that will enjoy being ridden then, without having to brace herself.

[ 09-13-2006, 03:44 PM: Message edited by: Merry ]

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There are other conformation faults that I would pass her for, like her neck, the short pasterns, that may give you a rough ride, her big, roman nosed head and such.

But, if she rides well for you, has a very good mind and you both get along well, why let any fault bother you?

Just remember that, if she doesn't work well for you, the next buyer may take all that in consideration and she will be a little harder to sell than a better looking horse.

Swayback? That is way back in secondary place.

I also have known some terribly swaybacked horses, swayback called lordosis, that were great jumpers into their old age. They do require sometimes a double pad for English or a cut back, built up pad for western saddles.

That is what we use and works fine, since we have a 14 year old ranch horse that is swaybacked.

He is so sweet that no one notices. [big Grin]

As far as building her muscling, you can do that with long low work at first, then, once she has learned to carry herself less braced onto her front end, her neck will develop more on top, lose that U neck on the bottom part and that will be part of the results of her engaging her hind end more and that will--finally we get to it--lift her back some.

All that will be a great learning experience for you as a rider and very rewarding for you and the mare, that will enjoy being ridden then, without having to brace herself.

[ 09-13-2006, 03:44 PM: Message edited by: Merry ]

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I only read like one post and i definately have to say i disagree. I have seen a severly sway backed horse actually improve and jump 3*6 PLUS!! at the farm I have bugz at there is a 6 y/o that was born with a sway back and he is a PHOMINAL jumper and one of the coolest horse i have ever seen!! I would give her a look. She looks sweet. She has a bit of a sway back. There are ways to tighten her back muscles and in the long run will actually lift her back up. If you lounge her in a long low fram it will work her back muscles and if you do lots of hill work with side reighns or draw reighns. I like her i would say go look at her!!

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I only read like one post and i definately have to say i disagree. I have seen a severly sway backed horse actually improve and jump 3*6 PLUS!! at the farm I have bugz at there is a 6 y/o that was born with a sway back and he is a PHOMINAL jumper and one of the coolest horse i have ever seen!! I would give her a look. She looks sweet. She has a bit of a sway back. There are ways to tighten her back muscles and in the long run will actually lift her back up. If you lounge her in a long low fram it will work her back muscles and if you do lots of hill work with side reighns or draw reighns. I like her i would say go look at her!!

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quote:

....I also have known some terribly swaybacked horses, swayback called lordosis, that were great jumpers into their old age.

....well I don't know if one of the horses I've seen around our town has that affliction, but suffice it to say that the horse is SO "U" shaped that the english saddle doesn't even remotely hide it and the rump and shoulders gave the very disconcerting impression of almost being "around" the rider.

And the owner does English jumping.

And is a.........rather large girl.

You'd wonder how physically it would even work.

Eeeeek [Eek!]

[ 09-13-2006, 03:40 PM: Message edited by: Cactus Rose ]

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quote:

....I also have known some terribly swaybacked horses, swayback called lordosis, that were great jumpers into their old age.

....well I don't know if one of the horses I've seen around our town has that affliction, but suffice it to say that the horse is SO "U" shaped that the english saddle doesn't even remotely hide it and the rump and shoulders gave the very disconcerting impression of almost being "around" the rider.

And the owner does English jumping.

And is a.........rather large girl.

You'd wonder how physically it would even work.

Eeeeek [Eek!]

[ 09-13-2006, 03:40 PM: Message edited by: Cactus Rose ]

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She's cute..yes she's swayed..but I say if she's good for what you want to use her for and the vet passes her..price is what you can afford, go for it! I've seen worse champions just like the others mentioned...I'd give her a look...it's hard to "really" get the "full picture" from a photo!

JMHO

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She's cute..yes she's swayed..but I say if she's good for what you want to use her for and the vet passes her..price is what you can afford, go for it! I've seen worse champions just like the others mentioned...I'd give her a look...it's hard to "really" get the "full picture" from a photo!

JMHO

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Yep, she's sway-backed and high withered. But, I'm going to go with the assumption that something about this horse feels right for you.

I owned a grand-daughter of Three Bars that inherited his back,(look for pictures-he definitely had both), and she was trail ridden until she was 30. She lived to be 34. She was my first horse, too.

Here's a few tips to keep your horse's back toned up.

1) Do some stretches with her. They are good for all horses. Get her to bend her neck around following a treat until she touches her own shoulder on each side. Use something slightly pointy to run along her the middle of her belly from about her sternum to before her navel. She should flex her back up, (like you have if someone runs a pen down the middle of your foot). Give her rubdowns especially her neck and either side of her spine. It's also a good way to tell if her saddle is making her sore.

2) Saddle fit. As with all horses, this will change periodically. If you ride western, try to get a rounded skirt saddle and make sure it doesn't bridge on her back, (no contact in the middle). As my horse aged, her back weakened a bit, so I eventually bought a 1920s saddle from from an old saddle-maker that was rounded enough to fit her nicely. It cost me $300. There are also tree-less saddles that work well, (from what I've heard), but are much more expensive. Some ideas for saddle pads: egg crate foam shaped to the saddle's underside, pads that are shaped more like a horse's back vice rectangular. Fuss over saddling her. When you think you have it right, walk her with her halter and watch her expression. If she's relaxed, you're probably right, if not, adjust and watch her again. After a while she'll tell you if it's right by relaxing when she's walked out. At her age, she should be able to tell if it's going to make her sore.

3) Take a few dressage lessons, regardless of your discipline, to learn how to get your horse to collect herself and use her back.

4) Try to ride her with a relaxed head. When her head is lowered, her back is higher and when she throws her head up, she is hollowing her back.

5) Trotting her on trails is a great way to condition her and keep her back toned up.

I wouldn't have traded my mare for anything. When she was older, over 60 different people rode her, mostly children, and she gave them a good, safe ride. When she was very old, I remember a parent brought their child to the barn and asked what was wrong with her back. "Nothing", I replied, "her back is just weighed down by the angel wings she's been carrying all these years".

[ 09-15-2006, 08:39 AM: Message edited by: Little Cow ]

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Yep, she's sway-backed and high withered. But, I'm going to go with the assumption that something about this horse feels right for you.

I owned a grand-daughter of Three Bars that inherited his back,(look for pictures-he definitely had both), and she was trail ridden until she was 30. She lived to be 34. She was my first horse, too.

Here's a few tips to keep your horse's back toned up.

1) Do some stretches with her. They are good for all horses. Get her to bend her neck around following a treat until she touches her own shoulder on each side. Use something slightly pointy to run along her the middle of her belly from about her sternum to before her navel. She should flex her back up, (like you have if someone runs a pen down the middle of your foot). Give her rubdowns especially her neck and either side of her spine. It's also a good way to tell if her saddle is making her sore.

2) Saddle fit. As with all horses, this will change periodically. If you ride western, try to get a rounded skirt saddle and make sure it doesn't bridge on her back, (no contact in the middle). As my horse aged, her back weakened a bit, so I eventually bought a 1920s saddle from from an old saddle-maker that was rounded enough to fit her nicely. It cost me $300. There are also tree-less saddles that work well, (from what I've heard), but are much more expensive. Some ideas for saddle pads: egg crate foam shaped to the saddle's underside, pads that are shaped more like a horse's back vice rectangular. Fuss over saddling her. When you think you have it right, walk her with her halter and watch her expression. If she's relaxed, you're probably right, if not, adjust and watch her again. After a while she'll tell you if it's right by relaxing when she's walked out. At her age, she should be able to tell if it's going to make her sore.

3) Take a few dressage lessons, regardless of your discipline, to learn how to get your horse to collect herself and use her back.

4) Try to ride her with a relaxed head. When her head is lowered, her back is higher and when she throws her head up, she is hollowing her back.

5) Trotting her on trails is a great way to condition her and keep her back toned up.

I wouldn't have traded my mare for anything. When she was older, over 60 different people rode her, mostly children, and she gave them a good, safe ride. When she was very old, I remember a parent brought their child to the barn and asked what was wrong with her back. "Nothing", I replied, "her back is just weighed down by the angel wings she's been carrying all these years".

[ 09-15-2006, 08:39 AM: Message edited by: Little Cow ]

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