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Zinge

MTG to "Prevent" rain rot

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I recently heard from a horse owner, she uses mtg to "prevent" rain rot before a horse gets it. She said she just slathers it on them about once a week. Has anyone used this? Did it work as a preventative? I have a horse who gets rain rot in the fall, I have blanketed him in the past to prevent it but he absolutely destroys blankets, went through 2 last year. Will the mtg stop the rain rot before it starts? Is it safe to put on once a week?

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I recently heard from a horse owner, she uses mtg to "prevent" rain rot before a horse gets it. She said she just slathers it on them about once a week. Has anyone used this? Did it work as a preventative? I have a horse who gets rain rot in the fall, I have blanketed him in the past to prevent it but he absolutely destroys blankets, went through 2 last year. Will the mtg stop the rain rot before it starts? Is it safe to put on once a week?

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You can prevent it by keeping your horse clean/groomed and dry and by keeping your saddle blankets, tack, blankets, sheets clean and dry. And by keeping them healthy with proper nutrition as those with compromised immune systems are more prone.

I know everyone swears by MTG...but I'll be honest...my horses are outside 24/7 through the whole summer, stalled only at night during the winter, get groomed regularly, I wash saddle pads after 2 or 3 rides, etc...my horses don't get rain rot.

Save yourself the money.

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You can prevent it by keeping your horse clean/groomed and dry and by keeping your saddle blankets, tack, blankets, sheets clean and dry. And by keeping them healthy with proper nutrition as those with compromised immune systems are more prone.

I know everyone swears by MTG...but I'll be honest...my horses are outside 24/7 through the whole summer, stalled only at night during the winter, get groomed regularly, I wash saddle pads after 2 or 3 rides, etc...my horses don't get rain rot.

Save yourself the money.

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I wish this horse was that easy. He prefers to go stand in the rain and eat grass. My horses are stalled only 2 hours per day summer and winter and have ample shelter which is clean and dry. But this boy still wants to be outside in the weather. He is healthy, fed well, and all of his tack is clean. He still manages to get rain rot, he has never gotten it terrible but he has gotten it each fall. I need to find a way to prevent it without blanketing him.

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I wish this horse was that easy. He prefers to go stand in the rain and eat grass. My horses are stalled only 2 hours per day summer and winter and have ample shelter which is clean and dry. But this boy still wants to be outside in the weather. He is healthy, fed well, and all of his tack is clean. He still manages to get rain rot, he has never gotten it terrible but he has gotten it each fall. I need to find a way to prevent it without blanketing him.

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The best thing to prevent rain rot is good nutrition.

Inadequate nutrition hinders the immune system, which is what keeps bacteria and fungus in check.

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The best thing to prevent rain rot is good nutrition.

Inadequate nutrition hinders the immune system, which is what keeps bacteria and fungus in check.

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Honestly, my horses have good nutrition. Could someone tell me if they have used the mtg to prevent rain rot?

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Honestly, my horses have good nutrition. Could someone tell me if they have used the mtg to prevent rain rot?

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Have you ever used MTG?

It's nasty stuff, IMO.

Not only does it smell horrible (gag), but it's very heavy and greasy. My sister tried it to treat a rainrot like condition (but, it didn't really seem like rainrot...) on her horse and it was GROSS. His hair was greasy/matted (longer winter coat)... we actually had to wash him SEVERAL times in an attempt to get it OFF of him because we thought it was too cool/cold for his hair to be greasy like that. It didn't "fluff" like the rest of his winter hair...

We kept thinking it'd *dry*, but day after day, it was this sticky mess...

Didn't come out very easily, either.

As far as using it as a prevention... can't help you there. *I* personally won't use it for anything. I don't know of anyone that's used it as a prevention. I'd feel sorry for their greasy horse...

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Have you ever used MTG?

It's nasty stuff, IMO.

Not only does it smell horrible (gag), but it's very heavy and greasy. My sister tried it to treat a rainrot like condition (but, it didn't really seem like rainrot...) on her horse and it was GROSS. His hair was greasy/matted (longer winter coat)... we actually had to wash him SEVERAL times in an attempt to get it OFF of him because we thought it was too cool/cold for his hair to be greasy like that. It didn't "fluff" like the rest of his winter hair...

We kept thinking it'd *dry*, but day after day, it was this sticky mess...

Didn't come out very easily, either.

As far as using it as a prevention... can't help you there. *I* personally won't use it for anything. I don't know of anyone that's used it as a prevention. I'd feel sorry for their greasy horse...

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I have not used it to prevent anything,,,, But like you have heard raves about it. I did just purchase a bottle of it through Jeffers. It is not that expensive and it is also good for manes and tails so I would try it and see. I know that there used to be people on here going on and on about how great it is sooooooo, I thought I would reply to bump this up so others that actually can answer your Question might see it and reply.

Good Luck.............TTFN.........Tiggs

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I have not used it to prevent anything,,,, But like you have heard raves about it. I did just purchase a bottle of it through Jeffers. It is not that expensive and it is also good for manes and tails so I would try it and see. I know that there used to be people on here going on and on about how great it is sooooooo, I thought I would reply to bump this up so others that actually can answer your Question might see it and reply.

Good Luck.............TTFN.........Tiggs

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Thanks for the response. hmmm, thats the last thing I want is a greasy icky mess. The other thing the woman had mentioned to me was listerine and mineral oil, I thought that would be a greasy mess. Guess its not going to be as easy to prevent it as I thought, and I know its coming. I'll have to research and see what else I could possibly use. Anyone else with ideas?

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Adequate Vitamin A levels will completely prevent rain rot. We have added vitamin A to our formulated feed for more than 30 years. Since that time, we have not had any rain rot and we have not had a single mare retain her placenta. We see very little, if any, flakey skin, dandruff or lice, even during prolonged bad weather. We also never have runny, goopy eyes during the winter months. This is one of the first signs that a horse has inadequate A intake.

Good healthy skin comes from within -- not from slathering on a skin conditioner.

Even having bright green hay, including alfalfa, does not guarantee that the horse can convert the carotene to Vitamin A.

[ 10-04-2006, 06:45 PM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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Thanks for the response. hmmm, thats the last thing I want is a greasy icky mess. The other thing the woman had mentioned to me was listerine and mineral oil, I thought that would be a greasy mess. Guess its not going to be as easy to prevent it as I thought, and I know its coming. I'll have to research and see what else I could possibly use. Anyone else with ideas?

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Adequate Vitamin A levels will completely prevent rain rot. We have added vitamin A to our formulated feed for more than 30 years. Since that time, we have not had any rain rot and we have not had a single mare retain her placenta. We see very little, if any, flakey skin, dandruff or lice, even during prolonged bad weather. We also never have runny, goopy eyes during the winter months. This is one of the first signs that a horse has inadequate A intake.

Good healthy skin comes from within -- not from slathering on a skin conditioner.

Even having bright green hay, including alfalfa, does not guarantee that the horse can convert the carotene to Vitamin A.

[ 10-04-2006, 06:45 PM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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Zinge,

I have to agree that a balance diet is a must here. Also another thought to add to this is oils. I use to have a hard time with rain rot around here due to all the sand we have. It was a nightmare keeping horses cleaned. If one were to get sick, God Forebid that it reared its ugly head and pretty soon the entire herd had patches. I always add Black Oil Sunflower Seeds to my fall and winter mix.

I have also tried the run of products people claim to be wonderful. Lots of wasted money. MTG is just nasty. It will grow hair - I will give it that, but the lingering smell is enough to have my herd scatter! Even after trying everything the vet threw at me - including antibiotics, he and I asked a well known horse breeder in our area. She told us to use Listerine and Baby Oil - about a 80/20 mix. The baby oil does not leave a greasy feeling to the coat at all. And the Listerine has never burned my horses like some other chemicals recommended for this condition. After a good rain here, I have even used this to spray down the herd and prevent anything from cropping up.

Review your feed, but also remember that environmental conditions do have a factor even with the healthest of horses.

edited to clarify --- 80 Listerine/20 Baby Oil

[ 10-05-2006, 09:44 AM: Message edited by: CountryMom ]

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Zinge,

I have to agree that a balance diet is a must here. Also another thought to add to this is oils. I use to have a hard time with rain rot around here due to all the sand we have. It was a nightmare keeping horses cleaned. If one were to get sick, God Forebid that it reared its ugly head and pretty soon the entire herd had patches. I always add Black Oil Sunflower Seeds to my fall and winter mix.

I have also tried the run of products people claim to be wonderful. Lots of wasted money. MTG is just nasty. It will grow hair - I will give it that, but the lingering smell is enough to have my herd scatter! Even after trying everything the vet threw at me - including antibiotics, he and I asked a well known horse breeder in our area. She told us to use Listerine and Baby Oil - about a 80/20 mix. The baby oil does not leave a greasy feeling to the coat at all. And the Listerine has never burned my horses like some other chemicals recommended for this condition. After a good rain here, I have even used this to spray down the herd and prevent anything from cropping up.

Review your feed, but also remember that environmental conditions do have a factor even with the healthest of horses.

edited to clarify --- 80 Listerine/20 Baby Oil

[ 10-05-2006, 09:44 AM: Message edited by: CountryMom ]

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I have used MTG as a treatment for rain rot and yes it does work and yes it is greasey and yes it does smell. I now feed black oil sunflower seeds year round. These are good for the coat, hooves and digestive tract. My farrier is the one who told me about the benefits of black oil sunflower seeds. I swear by them. My horses have nice shiney coats year round and they shed out very nicely also. So I would suggest black oil sunflower seeds as a preventitive (sp).

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I have used MTG as a treatment for rain rot and yes it does work and yes it is greasey and yes it does smell. I now feed black oil sunflower seeds year round. These are good for the coat, hooves and digestive tract. My farrier is the one who told me about the benefits of black oil sunflower seeds. I swear by them. My horses have nice shiney coats year round and they shed out very nicely also. So I would suggest black oil sunflower seeds as a preventitive (sp).

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Listerene by itself will work quite nicely, no need to add oil for the dirt to stick to. And balanced nutrition alone will usually prevent it. My lot is normally out 24/7, unless it's REALLY ugly weather, and I have never had rainrot except for a couple new horses, and they never had it again.

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Listerene by itself will work quite nicely, no need to add oil for the dirt to stick to. And balanced nutrition alone will usually prevent it. My lot is normally out 24/7, unless it's REALLY ugly weather, and I have never had rainrot except for a couple new horses, and they never had it again.

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My mare had rainrot in the fall...although she was a rescue and I figured it was from the poor care she had before me. However, her colt is in his second fall, and he had rainrot last year, and has it right now. He's not malnourished by any means - and is groomed daily, etc. He does have very sensitive skin anyway (as did his mother), so maybe he's just more susceptible to it. Then I got to thinking - I haven't had him on corn oil because his feed has veg. oil added and I didn't think it was necessary to add more. But I never had a problem with rainrot in any horse I ever gave oil to. So he's going to be my guinea pig...

Anyway, I wouldn't treat it topically either. Wouldn't want to add anything dirt can stick to, to an already dirty situation.

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My mare had rainrot in the fall...although she was a rescue and I figured it was from the poor care she had before me. However, her colt is in his second fall, and he had rainrot last year, and has it right now. He's not malnourished by any means - and is groomed daily, etc. He does have very sensitive skin anyway (as did his mother), so maybe he's just more susceptible to it. Then I got to thinking - I haven't had him on corn oil because his feed has veg. oil added and I didn't think it was necessary to add more. But I never had a problem with rainrot in any horse I ever gave oil to. So he's going to be my guinea pig...

Anyway, I wouldn't treat it topically either. Wouldn't want to add anything dirt can stick to, to an already dirty situation.

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By adding the baby oil with the listerine it helps to loosen the scale without pain. Then the days to follow it will easily fall out of the coat and take less fur with it. If you want to use it as prevention there is no reason you can't do as Oz said and just use the Listerine. I actually found MTG to collect a ton more dirt than baby oil. Plus, you are using less oil all together than the MTG has in it.

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By adding the baby oil with the listerine it helps to loosen the scale without pain. Then the days to follow it will easily fall out of the coat and take less fur with it. If you want to use it as prevention there is no reason you can't do as Oz said and just use the Listerine. I actually found MTG to collect a ton more dirt than baby oil. Plus, you are using less oil all together than the MTG has in it.

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