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Eventersrule

Especially smelly manure?

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I know this sounds like a really stupid question, but...

The person who cleans stalls at my barn has been recently telling me that one of my horse's manure smells REALLY bad, like stinkier than any of the other horse's. My horse is fed the same thing as the others(beet pulp and safe choice) except for supplements; a joint supplement, B-L solution, and Biotin.

Other than that, the horse is perfectly healthy. He does tend to shed his winter coat later than the other horses (someone mentioned thyroid problem perhaps?), but I'm pretty sure that's just the way he is -- he's been that way for 5 years, and he has a definite short summer coat. He just isn't completely shedded until roughly 3 weeks later than the other horses. That seems unrelated, but I had to mention it.

Is this any sign of a weird problem? Or is it just the stall cleaners whining?

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I know this sounds like a really stupid question, but...

The person who cleans stalls at my barn has been recently telling me that one of my horse's manure smells REALLY bad, like stinkier than any of the other horse's. My horse is fed the same thing as the others(beet pulp and safe choice) except for supplements; a joint supplement, B-L solution, and Biotin.

Other than that, the horse is perfectly healthy. He does tend to shed his winter coat later than the other horses (someone mentioned thyroid problem perhaps?), but I'm pretty sure that's just the way he is -- he's been that way for 5 years, and he has a definite short summer coat. He just isn't completely shedded until roughly 3 weeks later than the other horses. That seems unrelated, but I had to mention it.

Is this any sign of a weird problem? Or is it just the stall cleaners whining?

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Hmm, I know when our cows have smelly manure, usually means they are sick, or something is wrong.

But since your horse is healthy, or at least appears to be, I wouldnt worry to much, it could be the diet that your horse is on, the suppplements may cause it or if you are really conserned maybe ask your vet when you see him/her next.

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Hmm, I know when our cows have smelly manure, usually means they are sick, or something is wrong.

But since your horse is healthy, or at least appears to be, I wouldnt worry to much, it could be the diet that your horse is on, the suppplements may cause it or if you are really conserned maybe ask your vet when you see him/her next.

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Stinky poop is a warning. I came down stairs a month ago and noticed one of the new boarders was really stinky and I recognized the smell. He was eating, no temp but I knew from the smell it was Clostridium dificile. You need to get one of his fecal balls to the vets for examination for either Salmonella or Clost. dific. Both these will make them stink really bad and its very contagious and can be life threatening. Could be just him or a change in weather or something he got in the field but better checked then not.

Clost. Def. is called deficile because its difficult to detect. Hopefully its nothing but better to know than not and have something run through your barn. Just had to bleach my entire barn and discenfect everything...what a PITA.

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Stinky poop is a warning. I came down stairs a month ago and noticed one of the new boarders was really stinky and I recognized the smell. He was eating, no temp but I knew from the smell it was Clostridium dificile. You need to get one of his fecal balls to the vets for examination for either Salmonella or Clost. dific. Both these will make them stink really bad and its very contagious and can be life threatening. Could be just him or a change in weather or something he got in the field but better checked then not.

Clost. Def. is called deficile because its difficult to detect. Hopefully its nothing but better to know than not and have something run through your barn. Just had to bleach my entire barn and discenfect everything...what a PITA.

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Horseshoe, I very well could be wrong, but I thought that salmonella/clostridium was associated with diarrhea? This horse is producing normal manure balls, just smelly according to stall cleaners. I'm going to be doing his stall tomorrow, if I think it's stinky too, perhaps I'll collect some to get sampled.

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Horseshoe, I very well could be wrong, but I thought that salmonella/clostridium was associated with diarrhea? This horse is producing normal manure balls, just smelly according to stall cleaners. I'm going to be doing his stall tomorrow, if I think it's stinky too, perhaps I'll collect some to get sampled.

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If it were me I'd take a sample to the vets anyways. You never can be too careful. If it is salmonella/clostridium you want to nip it now, before it gets bad.

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If it were me I'd take a sample to the vets anyways. You never can be too careful. If it is salmonella/clostridium you want to nip it now, before it gets bad.

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Good thing you're willing to supply the sample for the vet. I was wondering for the meantime if this horse is being feed supplements?

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Good thing you're willing to supply the sample for the vet. I was wondering for the meantime if this horse is being feed supplements?

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quote:

Originally posted by Pamela:

Good thing you're willing to supply the sample for the vet. I was wondering for the meantime if this horse is being feed supplements?

Supplements came to my mind as well. I started one of mine on Recovery EQ and Lakota. His passing gas and poops are a little smellier than before.

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quote:

Originally posted by Pamela:

Good thing you're willing to supply the sample for the vet. I was wondering for the meantime if this horse is being feed supplements?

Supplements came to my mind as well. I started one of mine on Recovery EQ and Lakota. His passing gas and poops are a little smellier than before.

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The horse that was treated for Clost. dif. only had 1 loose pile and the rest where just a little soft but formed. It was the smell, its very different and has a sick smell. The loose pile wasn't even as bad as cow poop, it just wasn't formed well. The horse also didn't have a temp and never went off feed. The vets said I caught it super early and we got him on Metro fast enough...oh and that morning I had him on Bio-Sponge and Dia-gel for horses. Good thing I have all this stuff on hand.

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The horse that was treated for Clost. dif. only had 1 loose pile and the rest where just a little soft but formed. It was the smell, its very different and has a sick smell. The loose pile wasn't even as bad as cow poop, it just wasn't formed well. The horse also didn't have a temp and never went off feed. The vets said I caught it super early and we got him on Metro fast enough...oh and that morning I had him on Bio-Sponge and Dia-gel for horses. Good thing I have all this stuff on hand.

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One of the signs you need to call a vet a.s.a.p is:

*Oder to feces. Not normal oder but like you said, worse than the others.

*Blood and mucus

*Diarrhea persisting more than 8-12 hours

*Loss of appetite, depression, other deviations from normal behavior.

*Fever

*Signs of colic

*Increased pulse rate

*Signs of laminitis.

*If diarrhea appears suddenly and dramatically, theres definitely cause for concern.

Potentail causes:

*Infectious disease that can be parasitic-small strongyles, salmonella and Potomac Horse fever.

*Altered intestinal flora

*Diet-excessive carboyhdrates or sudden changes in diet.

*Inflammatory bowel disease syndromes

*Neoplasia(tumor)

*Altered organ function, such as heart failure

*Sand in the gut

*Idiopathic(of unknown origin)

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One of the signs you need to call a vet a.s.a.p is:

*Oder to feces. Not normal oder but like you said, worse than the others.

*Blood and mucus

*Diarrhea persisting more than 8-12 hours

*Loss of appetite, depression, other deviations from normal behavior.

*Fever

*Signs of colic

*Increased pulse rate

*Signs of laminitis.

*If diarrhea appears suddenly and dramatically, theres definitely cause for concern.

Potentail causes:

*Infectious disease that can be parasitic-small strongyles, salmonella and Potomac Horse fever.

*Altered intestinal flora

*Diet-excessive carboyhdrates or sudden changes in diet.

*Inflammatory bowel disease syndromes

*Neoplasia(tumor)

*Altered organ function, such as heart failure

*Sand in the gut

*Idiopathic(of unknown origin)

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