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RodeoCowgirl504

MY HORSE- irregular heartbeat!!!

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So the vet came out to float both of my rodeo horses teeth yesterday. He checked there heartbeats and one of my horses had an irregular heartbeat- could someone please explain what this is? Im pretty worried but the vet said he was probably born with it. The horse will be 18 this spring. Thanks for any information in advance... [Confused]

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So the vet came out to float both of my rodeo horses teeth yesterday. He checked there heartbeats and one of my horses had an irregular heartbeat- could someone please explain what this is? Im pretty worried but the vet said he was probably born with it. The horse will be 18 this spring. Thanks for any information in advance... [Confused]

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Did the vet offer any type of med options? I know nothing about horses with irregular heart beats but I took my dog to the vet last week, he's 13. Vet said he had a bad ticker and gave me some meds for him. Pretty cheap too, said its basically the same thing people take.

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Did the vet offer any type of med options? I know nothing about horses with irregular heart beats but I took my dog to the vet last week, he's 13. Vet said he had a bad ticker and gave me some meds for him. Pretty cheap too, said its basically the same thing people take.

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Sounds like a heart murmur...I know dogs are born with it. I'm surprised the vet didn't go into any more detail about it. Hmm..

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Sounds like a heart murmur...I know dogs are born with it. I'm surprised the vet didn't go into any more detail about it. Hmm..

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Horses are pretty widely known to commonly have a condition called secondary AV-block, where they essentially skip a heart beat. In and of itself, its not that big of a deal, as long as that's what it really is. Easiest way of determining what's going on is to listen with the horse at rest, and then again after its been exercised. AV blocks go away with activity.

So without more information, there's really not much we can offer.

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Horses are pretty widely known to commonly have a condition called secondary AV-block, where they essentially skip a heart beat. In and of itself, its not that big of a deal, as long as that's what it really is. Easiest way of determining what's going on is to listen with the horse at rest, and then again after its been exercised. AV blocks go away with activity.

So without more information, there's really not much we can offer.

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At the equine center we do TPR's and Flows every 1 - 8 hrs depending on the horse. You wouldn't believe how many irregular heart beats we hear. Some of these horses are race horses, eventers, dressage, timber horses. We also have a cardiologist as head of the med. department and says while they can have all sorts of irregular heart beats is not that common to have to stop riding a horse because of it...some you do.

The drop beat is when you just hear a dropped beat, a murmur is you can hear this swoosh with one of the beats, some you can bearly here it and others its very obvious. Some get taccacardia, there are others but I'd have to go look at my notes, she gave an awesome lecture for the nurses.

[ 04-14-2007, 08:41 AM: Message edited by: Horseshoe ]

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At the equine center we do TPR's and Flows every 1 - 8 hrs depending on the horse. You wouldn't believe how many irregular heart beats we hear. Some of these horses are race horses, eventers, dressage, timber horses. We also have a cardiologist as head of the med. department and says while they can have all sorts of irregular heart beats is not that common to have to stop riding a horse because of it...some you do.

The drop beat is when you just hear a dropped beat, a murmur is you can hear this swoosh with one of the beats, some you can bearly here it and others its very obvious. Some get taccacardia, there are others but I'd have to go look at my notes, she gave an awesome lecture for the nurses.

[ 04-14-2007, 08:41 AM: Message edited by: Horseshoe ]

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Last year one of my mares had a problem with this. They first discovered it when she had a retained placenta. That visit to the hospital they didn't say anything else about it. 3 weeks later she developed anterior enteritis. This ended up in a 3 week visit to the hospital and, of course, all kinds of monitoring. Her heart beat was irregular, plus it would race, as much as 180 beats a minute. She ended up on people heart meds, digoxin and atenelol. During all of this I started looking into the irregular heart beat thing and discovered some things.

1st, I have drafts. Drafts and dogs are like people and irregular heart beats mean more than they often do in light horses. There are many performance horses that have this and it does not impact their life. So, the moral to this story is, you should do some follow up and get more info from your vet on this condition in your horse. It might be fine, but it might not.

Good luck! We have taken my horse (after about 6 months) off the digoxin. We are getting ready to get her off the atenelol too.

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Last year one of my mares had a problem with this. They first discovered it when she had a retained placenta. That visit to the hospital they didn't say anything else about it. 3 weeks later she developed anterior enteritis. This ended up in a 3 week visit to the hospital and, of course, all kinds of monitoring. Her heart beat was irregular, plus it would race, as much as 180 beats a minute. She ended up on people heart meds, digoxin and atenelol. During all of this I started looking into the irregular heart beat thing and discovered some things.

1st, I have drafts. Drafts and dogs are like people and irregular heart beats mean more than they often do in light horses. There are many performance horses that have this and it does not impact their life. So, the moral to this story is, you should do some follow up and get more info from your vet on this condition in your horse. It might be fine, but it might not.

Good luck! We have taken my horse (after about 6 months) off the digoxin. We are getting ready to get her off the atenelol too.

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