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Panda 92009

Is Palmolive dishsoap used as a blistering agent?

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Today I volunteered to clean a sheath. For the past 2 1/2 years the vet I assisted used Palmolive, I could identify that smell in a heartbeat, and the combination of Palmolive and smegma will make be a Dawn detergent user forever! [smile]

Anyway, the trainer seemed shocked I was using it, and told me it was used for blistering stifles. I'm not a big fan of blistering, and have very little experience with it.

I used the Palmolive, really made sure all of the soap was completely rinsed, ran the hose with warm water up to make sure there was no soap residue, did a thorough job. The poor horse I was cleaning was a 4 yr. old that had never been cleaned. He had a bean the size of a grape as well as a smaller one.

So, could someone shed light on this subject? Thanks!

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Today I volunteered to clean a sheath. For the past 2 1/2 years the vet I assisted used Palmolive, I could identify that smell in a heartbeat, and the combination of Palmolive and smegma will make be a Dawn detergent user forever! [smile]

Anyway, the trainer seemed shocked I was using it, and told me it was used for blistering stifles. I'm not a big fan of blistering, and have very little experience with it.

I used the Palmolive, really made sure all of the soap was completely rinsed, ran the hose with warm water up to make sure there was no soap residue, did a thorough job. The poor horse I was cleaning was a 4 yr. old that had never been cleaned. He had a bean the size of a grape as well as a smaller one.

So, could someone shed light on this subject? Thanks!

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what is blistering stiffles?

Common sense and the chemical warefare training i have had tells me if Palmolive was a blistering agent it wouldnt be used to clean dishes and the vet you worked with wouldnt have use it. Am i missing someing?

Did any of the horses you cleaned before have any sort of skin irritation from this?

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what is blistering stiffles?

Common sense and the chemical warefare training i have had tells me if Palmolive was a blistering agent it wouldnt be used to clean dishes and the vet you worked with wouldnt have use it. Am i missing someing?

Did any of the horses you cleaned before have any sort of skin irritation from this?

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Out of the hundreds of horses we cleaned, we never got a call from a client saying "Pookie's sheath is blistered". I could understand that any detergent could be an irritant if not washed away completely, but I thoroughly washed any detergent residue away.

The trainer mentioned Ivory soap, and I know many individuals (including myself) that are allergic to Ivory. It is supposedly "so gentle", but Ivory can cause many allergic reactions.

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Out of the hundreds of horses we cleaned, we never got a call from a client saying "Pookie's sheath is blistered". I could understand that any detergent could be an irritant if not washed away completely, but I thoroughly washed any detergent residue away.

The trainer mentioned Ivory soap, and I know many individuals (including myself) that are allergic to Ivory. It is supposedly "so gentle", but Ivory can cause many allergic reactions.

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hmmmm [Confused] i'd love to hear some more from others with bad Palmolive experience or someone with a good explination....

i never thought of using a gentle dish soap....

"Cuts grease anywhere" haha

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hmmmm [Confused] i'd love to hear some more from others with bad Palmolive experience or someone with a good explination....

i never thought of using a gentle dish soap....

"Cuts grease anywhere" haha

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It's been used for yeeears as a blistering agent, according to my trainer. That is until it was found out that WD-40 works quicker, but not as long. Lots of people nowdays use the WD, but occassionally you'll find one that still uses Palmolive.

When my last gelding was having problems we thought stemmed form his stilfes being loose, we blistered him with WD just to see if helped/made a difference. Would have used Palmolive but because the dishsoap causes hair loss and sometimes burning of the skin and WD does not and we weren't sure if it was going to help, we figured we'd opt to keep his hair.

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It's been used for yeeears as a blistering agent, according to my trainer. That is until it was found out that WD-40 works quicker, but not as long. Lots of people nowdays use the WD, but occassionally you'll find one that still uses Palmolive.

When my last gelding was having problems we thought stemmed form his stilfes being loose, we blistered him with WD just to see if helped/made a difference. Would have used Palmolive but because the dishsoap causes hair loss and sometimes burning of the skin and WD does not and we weren't sure if it was going to help, we figured we'd opt to keep his hair.

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I thought Dawn dishsoap was the best to use. Animal Rescue teams use it to clean oil off of waterfowl after oil rig spills. Cuts the grease and does not harm the birds who must be doused with it. It even gets oil off of feathers.

hmm. Why would blistering be benificial? I know nothing about it.

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I thought Dawn dishsoap was the best to use. Animal Rescue teams use it to clean oil off of waterfowl after oil rig spills. Cuts the grease and does not harm the birds who must be doused with it. It even gets oil off of feathers.

hmm. Why would blistering be benificial? I know nothing about it.

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quote:

Originally posted by Athenah:

hmm. Why would blistering be benificial? I know nothing about it.

[Confused] still wondering the same thing

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quote:

Originally posted by Athenah:

hmm. Why would blistering be benificial? I know nothing about it.

[Confused] still wondering the same thing

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Blistering and pinfiring are used to get injuries to heal faster. Both have fallen out of favor, widely, as being inhumane and having no real benefit.

The belief is that an acute injury (vs. a chronic, slow healing injury) increases blood flow, heals faster with less scar tissue, etc.

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Blistering and pinfiring are used to get injuries to heal faster. Both have fallen out of favor, widely, as being inhumane and having no real benefit.

The belief is that an acute injury (vs. a chronic, slow healing injury) increases blood flow, heals faster with less scar tissue, etc.

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please tell me they ARENT injecting stifles and hocks with Polmolive or WD-40 to blister them??? who is doing this? isnt it considered cruelty to animals? (which people could go to jail for)

please? [Me Cry]

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please tell me they ARENT injecting stifles and hocks with Polmolive or WD-40 to blister them??? who is doing this? isnt it considered cruelty to animals? (which people could go to jail for)

please? [Me Cry]

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You don't inject it...you rub it on the skin. It would be a horrid idea to inject anything into the joint that isn't 100% already part of the regular joint material. Though there is still a debate about the humanity, it itsn't as bad as you are thinking.

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You don't inject it...you rub it on the skin. It would be a horrid idea to inject anything into the joint that isn't 100% already part of the regular joint material. Though there is still a debate about the humanity, it itsn't as bad as you are thinking.

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quote:

Originally posted by jumpin_horses:

please tell me they ARENT injecting stifles and hocks with Polmolive or WD-40 to blister them??? who is doing this? isnt it considered cruelty to animals? (which people could go to jail for)

please?
[Me Cry]

No, but they used to inject with iodine and peanut oil. It was called McKay's Solution. [bang Head]

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quote:

Originally posted by jumpin_horses:

please tell me they ARENT injecting stifles and hocks with Polmolive or WD-40 to blister them??? who is doing this? isnt it considered cruelty to animals? (which people could go to jail for)

please?
[Me Cry]

No, but they used to inject with iodine and peanut oil. It was called McKay's Solution. [bang Head]

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quote:

Originally posted by Mith:

You don't inject it...you rub it on the skin. It would be a horrid idea to inject anything into the joint that isn't 100% already part of the regular joint material. Though there is still a debate about the humanity, it itsn't as bad as you are thinking.

WHEW! but....... how on earth would blistering the skin correct a joint?????

isnt pinfiring (which is illegal in Europe, and IMO - very cruel) when they actually stick a hot pin right into the joint? .....

this horse has been pinfired.. see the dots on his hocks....

-

[ 06-08-2007, 03:43 PM: Message edited by: jumpin_horses ]

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quote:

Originally posted by Mith:

You don't inject it...you rub it on the skin. It would be a horrid idea to inject anything into the joint that isn't 100% already part of the regular joint material. Though there is still a debate about the humanity, it itsn't as bad as you are thinking.

WHEW! but....... how on earth would blistering the skin correct a joint?????

isnt pinfiring (which is illegal in Europe, and IMO - very cruel) when they actually stick a hot pin right into the joint? .....

this horse has been pinfired.. see the dots on his hocks....

-

[ 06-08-2007, 03:43 PM: Message edited by: jumpin_horses ]

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in the case of my gelding, it helped tighten the muscles/tendons/ligaments in his stifle so that he wasn't losing his left hind out from under him so often.

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in the case of my gelding, it helped tighten the muscles/tendons/ligaments in his stifle so that he wasn't losing his left hind out from under him so often.

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quote:

Originally posted by JumperCrazy:

in the case of my gelding, it helped tighten the muscles/tendons/ligaments in his stifle so that he wasn't losing his left hind out from under him so often.

how would blistering the skin help tighten ligaments?

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quote:

Originally posted by JumperCrazy:

in the case of my gelding, it helped tighten the muscles/tendons/ligaments in his stifle so that he wasn't losing his left hind out from under him so often.

how would blistering the skin help tighten ligaments?

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