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Doctoring Rain Rot in Cold Weather

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My horse has rain rot all over her body. I mean everywhere. It's cold, so I can't bathe her. What can I do?

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My horse has rain rot all over her body. I mean everywhere. It's cold, so I can't bathe her. What can I do?

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Rainrot happens when horses do not have the proper nutrition. You need to evaluate your feed, get your horses on a good hay, and a good vitamin supplement. Healthy horses with proper nutrition do not get rainrot. I live in the pacific NW, it rains here for weeks straight in the winter, I have not had a horse get rainrot yet.

Aside from fixing your feed plan, you need to have a dry place to put her for at least at night, if that is not possible, you need to get a couple waterproof blankets so you can rotate then every other night (while you wash the one she was just wearing, otherwise you will be reinfecting her every night). And, disinfect your brushes every single night, or you will be reinfecting her. You can wash them in bleach water, rinse well and dry before you use them again.

Finally, get some listerine origional, and wipe her down with that every other night.

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Rainrot happens when horses do not have the proper nutrition. You need to evaluate your feed, get your horses on a good hay, and a good vitamin supplement. Healthy horses with proper nutrition do not get rainrot. I live in the pacific NW, it rains here for weeks straight in the winter, I have not had a horse get rainrot yet.

Aside from fixing your feed plan, you need to have a dry place to put her for at least at night, if that is not possible, you need to get a couple waterproof blankets so you can rotate then every other night (while you wash the one she was just wearing, otherwise you will be reinfecting her every night). And, disinfect your brushes every single night, or you will be reinfecting her. You can wash them in bleach water, rinse well and dry before you use them again.

Finally, get some listerine origional, and wipe her down with that every other night.

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Gotta ditto...if you have a bad rainrot problem, there's likely something else going on...either A) deficit in nutrition (typically vit a, e, selenium which all affect integumentary health)

B) immune issue (Cushings horse for example might be more prone due to immune suppression)

C) Poor grooming techniques

If there is a large amount of area affected, I would consult your veterinarian--horse may need some systemic meds as well as a blood panel to see what's up.

Else, 1/2 OTC athletes foot cream like Tinactin or Lotrimin and 1/2 triple antibiotic ointment applied twice daily to affected areas.

You do need to try to loosen the scabs as the meds really can't get down to kill the organism if the scabs are there. After applying meds for a few days, the scabs will likely soften enough that you can gently pull them off.

Using baby wipes to clean the areas every few days would be helpful.

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Gotta ditto...if you have a bad rainrot problem, there's likely something else going on...either A) deficit in nutrition (typically vit a, e, selenium which all affect integumentary health)

B) immune issue (Cushings horse for example might be more prone due to immune suppression)

C) Poor grooming techniques

If there is a large amount of area affected, I would consult your veterinarian--horse may need some systemic meds as well as a blood panel to see what's up.

Else, 1/2 OTC athletes foot cream like Tinactin or Lotrimin and 1/2 triple antibiotic ointment applied twice daily to affected areas.

You do need to try to loosen the scabs as the meds really can't get down to kill the organism if the scabs are there. After applying meds for a few days, the scabs will likely soften enough that you can gently pull them off.

Using baby wipes to clean the areas every few days would be helpful.

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there is a general antibiotic that can often help, I had a mare who was getting propper feed, but her teeth were bad, and the vet put her on a general antibiotic, when her coat grew back out a bit more, she was fine..

what are you feeding? if your feeding too much grains, and not enough hay, or grasses this could cause her sugar levels to be too high causing her feet to grow to fast, and the skin to stack up, and when the moisture gets in, it is worse.. a nice slicker type dog brush will get all the way to the skin, dont brush too hard though it will be sensitive.. but this will help stimulate the hair shaft, looses the dirt and debrise, and also help keep the hairs sepperated.. if you have access to a warm garage, or a warm barn, you can use iodine on a rag and soak the really bad spots.. make sure she has a blanket on or a warm place till she is completely dry!

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there is a general antibiotic that can often help, I had a mare who was getting propper feed, but her teeth were bad, and the vet put her on a general antibiotic, when her coat grew back out a bit more, she was fine..

what are you feeding? if your feeding too much grains, and not enough hay, or grasses this could cause her sugar levels to be too high causing her feet to grow to fast, and the skin to stack up, and when the moisture gets in, it is worse.. a nice slicker type dog brush will get all the way to the skin, dont brush too hard though it will be sensitive.. but this will help stimulate the hair shaft, looses the dirt and debrise, and also help keep the hairs sepperated.. if you have access to a warm garage, or a warm barn, you can use iodine on a rag and soak the really bad spots.. make sure she has a blanket on or a warm place till she is completely dry!

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You can put a medicated powder on her b4 putting a blanket on her. My horse had rain rot last year, and that's what I did. It kept it from spreading. Just, everytime you take the blanket off, and put it back on, put more powder on her.

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You can put a medicated powder on her b4 putting a blanket on her. My horse had rain rot last year, and that's what I did. It kept it from spreading. Just, everytime you take the blanket off, and put it back on, put more powder on her.

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Funny I was always told it was a fungal issue not a feed one. Heck my books even say that. I am sure it helps but not the true cause of it.

I watch my girl's diets so it can't be that.

I guess not all cases are food related. My girl only got her bit of it after numerous days of rain and her refusal to get into her shelter the bugger.

I just brushed her out and sprayed a 90/10 mix of Absorbine Liniment and water, I have used it full strength as well and a few days later it is gone. Do not use on open wounds it does sting em.

Hers is almost gone now. When you brush a circular method really gets those things out of there. PS hers was in warmer weather as to keeping her warm in the winter and treating it is a bit harder.

Iodine has never worked for my girls when they have had it in the past we never get it alot just a rare occassion.

[ 11-24-2007, 02:59 AM: Message edited by: WildHorseSpirit ]

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Funny I was always told it was a fungal issue not a feed one. Heck my books even say that. I am sure it helps but not the true cause of it.

I watch my girl's diets so it can't be that.

I guess not all cases are food related. My girl only got her bit of it after numerous days of rain and her refusal to get into her shelter the bugger.

I just brushed her out and sprayed a 90/10 mix of Absorbine Liniment and water, I have used it full strength as well and a few days later it is gone. Do not use on open wounds it does sting em.

Hers is almost gone now. When you brush a circular method really gets those things out of there. PS hers was in warmer weather as to keeping her warm in the winter and treating it is a bit harder.

Iodine has never worked for my girls when they have had it in the past we never get it alot just a rare occassion.

[ 11-24-2007, 02:59 AM: Message edited by: WildHorseSpirit ]

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Many cases of rain rot are bacterial and not fungal. A couple of shots of Pennicilin helps many of them and can't hurt any of them.

It is TOTALLY brought on by a VITAMIN A DEFFICIENCY. You see it in horses that have poor nutrition available and do not have green grass to supply the Vitamin A they need. We see a lot of it around here in fat horses that are being fed oats and grass hay. Oats have 0 carotene, the precursor of vitamin A. Grass hay that is more than 3 or 4 months old also has no Vitamin A in it. So, these horses can be fat have have terrible hair coats, eyes and skin. Horses with an adequate diet that includes around 100,000 units of Vitamin A per day will not get rain rot, no matter what the weather conditions are. The fall is when you start seeing the most of it because the Vitamin A they store in their liver through the summer is running out.

You also see crusty or runny eyes from a Vitamin A deficiency. Again, they are most prevelant this time of year on through the late spring.

You can treat it with eeverything in the book and it will take about a month to lose all of the scabs and start regrowing hair. And if you do not address the Vitamin A defficiency, they still will not have a nice smooth hair coat and will just get it again.

Or, you can give them a million units of Vitamin A orally and they will be growing back hair in 3 or 4 weeks. (You can use the injectable made for cattle but just give it in the mouth) and then get them on a feed that supplies at least 3500 to 5000 units of Vitamin A per pound or put them on a Vitamin supplement that has a high level of A.

We have a custon pellet made for our own use and I have 10,000 units of A added to it per pound. I can't remember the last time I had rain rot in any of my own horses. Visiting mares that come with horrible cases of it are slick and have beautiful coats in about a month.

As an added footnote: we have not had a mare that was on our feed that ever needed to be 'cleaned' after foaling. They all drop their afterbirth within a few minutes and they rebreed very easily. This is also a result of adequate vitamin A.

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Many cases of rain rot are bacterial and not fungal. A couple of shots of Pennicilin helps many of them and can't hurt any of them.

It is TOTALLY brought on by a VITAMIN A DEFFICIENCY. You see it in horses that have poor nutrition available and do not have green grass to supply the Vitamin A they need. We see a lot of it around here in fat horses that are being fed oats and grass hay. Oats have 0 carotene, the precursor of vitamin A. Grass hay that is more than 3 or 4 months old also has no Vitamin A in it. So, these horses can be fat have have terrible hair coats, eyes and skin. Horses with an adequate diet that includes around 100,000 units of Vitamin A per day will not get rain rot, no matter what the weather conditions are. The fall is when you start seeing the most of it because the Vitamin A they store in their liver through the summer is running out.

You also see crusty or runny eyes from a Vitamin A deficiency. Again, they are most prevelant this time of year on through the late spring.

You can treat it with eeverything in the book and it will take about a month to lose all of the scabs and start regrowing hair. And if you do not address the Vitamin A defficiency, they still will not have a nice smooth hair coat and will just get it again.

Or, you can give them a million units of Vitamin A orally and they will be growing back hair in 3 or 4 weeks. (You can use the injectable made for cattle but just give it in the mouth) and then get them on a feed that supplies at least 3500 to 5000 units of Vitamin A per pound or put them on a Vitamin supplement that has a high level of A.

We have a custon pellet made for our own use and I have 10,000 units of A added to it per pound. I can't remember the last time I had rain rot in any of my own horses. Visiting mares that come with horrible cases of it are slick and have beautiful coats in about a month.

As an added footnote: we have not had a mare that was on our feed that ever needed to be 'cleaned' after foaling. They all drop their afterbirth within a few minutes and they rebreed very easily. This is also a result of adequate vitamin A.

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Cheri-question for you about feed and rainrot.

Horses are on Safechoice. It provides 3500U/lb of Vitamin A. Horses are out 24/7, on grass(still green here), no shelter.

They all have slight to moderate rain rot. Otherwise, bright-eyed, plenty of energy, healthy looking. Is it because they have NO shelter? Not even a good stand of trees.

Disclaimer-I do not have full control over this issue.

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Cheri-question for you about feed and rainrot.

Horses are on Safechoice. It provides 3500U/lb of Vitamin A. Horses are out 24/7, on grass(still green here), no shelter.

They all have slight to moderate rain rot. Otherwise, bright-eyed, plenty of energy, healthy looking. Is it because they have NO shelter? Not even a good stand of trees.

Disclaimer-I do not have full control over this issue.

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I have a mare and filly that have scabs here and there. Asked the vet and he said rain rot but with the cold weather it should go away. Just to get rid of the scabs...however I remember from earlier this summer I would put betadine on something and scrub the spot and let it dry on the skin. It did amazing with the spots of rain rot then. I have since gotten a spray bottle of this Fungus spray. Its in a white bottle with green outlining. I think its a betadine spray.

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I have a mare and filly that have scabs here and there. Asked the vet and he said rain rot but with the cold weather it should go away. Just to get rid of the scabs...however I remember from earlier this summer I would put betadine on something and scrub the spot and let it dry on the skin. It did amazing with the spots of rain rot then. I have since gotten a spray bottle of this Fungus spray. Its in a white bottle with green outlining. I think its a betadine spray.

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I second the proper nutrition part. I have never had a problem with rainrot on my horses when I was keeping them at home and could keep an eye on their feed. This spring/summer I had my horse at a barn that didn't feed him properly. He ended up very skinny and had a bad case of rainrot as well as scratches. He also had NO shelter whatsoever. Now that he is at the new barn and is getting good quality hay and the proper grain it has not come back, even with his thick winter coat. He is on straight oats and corn oil. When I had him at home, he was also on BOSS in a 1:4 ratio with his oats, and he had an awesome coat. He's fattened up a bit, but his coat is still dull, I'll probably put him on the BOSS again.

The way that I used to get rid of it is a mix of betadine and baby oil sprayed on and wiped in with a rag. Lots of currying, too, to work the scabs loose. A rubber curry in each hand in circular movements. You also need to disinfect everything so that it doesn't spread.

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I second the proper nutrition part. I have never had a problem with rainrot on my horses when I was keeping them at home and could keep an eye on their feed. This spring/summer I had my horse at a barn that didn't feed him properly. He ended up very skinny and had a bad case of rainrot as well as scratches. He also had NO shelter whatsoever. Now that he is at the new barn and is getting good quality hay and the proper grain it has not come back, even with his thick winter coat. He is on straight oats and corn oil. When I had him at home, he was also on BOSS in a 1:4 ratio with his oats, and he had an awesome coat. He's fattened up a bit, but his coat is still dull, I'll probably put him on the BOSS again.

The way that I used to get rid of it is a mix of betadine and baby oil sprayed on and wiped in with a rag. Lots of currying, too, to work the scabs loose. A rubber curry in each hand in circular movements. You also need to disinfect everything so that it doesn't spread.

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We have 50 horses out on pasture with no sheds or shelters of any kind except for the trees and brush. When I keep out enough mineral that has 150,000 units of A in it, I never get rain rot - even whith long extended periods of rain and clouds. They seem to get enough from the mineral. About 25 of the mature horses are on free choice round bales and pasture and no grain of any kind.

Unless you are feeding a large quantity of feed that has 3500 units per pound, they still are not getting enough A. That is one of the main reasons we put 10,000 Units of A in our custom made grain pellet.

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We have 50 horses out on pasture with no sheds or shelters of any kind except for the trees and brush. When I keep out enough mineral that has 150,000 units of A in it, I never get rain rot - even whith long extended periods of rain and clouds. They seem to get enough from the mineral. About 25 of the mature horses are on free choice round bales and pasture and no grain of any kind.

Unless you are feeding a large quantity of feed that has 3500 units per pound, they still are not getting enough A. That is one of the main reasons we put 10,000 Units of A in our custom made grain pellet.

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Thanks Cheri!

Didn't mean to steal your thread arienal [Embarrassed]

But thought maybe we both could benefit.

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Thanks Cheri!

Didn't mean to steal your thread arienal [Embarrassed]

But thought maybe we both could benefit.

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I don't think it always goes back to nutrition, I have very healthy horses and some years they get it and some they don't it is a bacteria that gets on the skin and when the hair is wet and matted down it can grow rapidly. I tell you what works quickly and is cheap. Babyoil just squirt it on there, and this will smother it and draw the sunlight to it, I have never had one get sunburnt or hurt in anyway from this and it really work.

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I don't think it always goes back to nutrition, I have very healthy horses and some years they get it and some they don't it is a bacteria that gets on the skin and when the hair is wet and matted down it can grow rapidly. I tell you what works quickly and is cheap. Babyoil just squirt it on there, and this will smother it and draw the sunlight to it, I have never had one get sunburnt or hurt in anyway from this and it really work.

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Edenn it does. Like Cheir, said, you can have nice fat horses, but that doesnt mean they are getting hte proper nutrition!

Cheir thanks! After reading all that I think I need to get some A supplements, my baby and my broodie both have a little bit of runny eyes.

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Edenn it does. Like Cheir, said, you can have nice fat horses, but that doesnt mean they are getting hte proper nutrition!

Cheir thanks! After reading all that I think I need to get some A supplements, my baby and my broodie both have a little bit of runny eyes.

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As far as healing them, one thing I have found that works on the paints is Eqyss Micro-Tek anti-microbial spray.

But I also wanted to know if there was an underlying (sp?) cause. Because they have it and others don't.

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As far as healing them, one thing I have found that works on the paints is Eqyss Micro-Tek anti-microbial spray.

But I also wanted to know if there was an underlying (sp?) cause. Because they have it and others don't.

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