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Cues for canter (somewhat long)


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#1 dressagewannabe

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 07:40 PM

I feel really stupid for asking this question for two reasons:
1). My regular horse and I show first level, training through third
2). The horse I am leasing is a Grand Prix schoolmaster, I SHOULD be able to ride him, so whats the problem?

Well, Dolorich is somewhat of a lazy horse, getting him jazzed up to ride is not an easy task, but I manage pretty well. The first couple of rides I couldn't get him in front of my leg. I fixed that.

But now I can't get him to canter. It's not a problem of him being in front of my leg, I can't get him down from the trot. I think there may be a few reasons for this:
1). I am not cueing him correctly.
2.) He is just being a total pain in the butt and avoiding work.

I'm voting for the second one because today when I rode after I took my legs out of the stirrups and bumped him hard with both legs, he seemed a little more willing to cooperate.

Now my real question is: I don't completely want to rule out my incorrect riding, I admit I am an amateur, I need help. Does anyone know any good websites (hopefully with pictures) that show/explain the correct leg/ weight cues for the canter. I really have to work on getting my leg back on him, I have short legs so its hard, but I would like a visual, I am much better at performing something if I can see it done correctly first.

Note: My trainer and I are going to get together next week and work this out. For the time being, I am just looking for somethings to work on before then. I'm trying really hard! [Frown]

Thanks in advance!

#2 JumperChic182

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 07:51 PM

THis website is probably one of the best I've ever stumbled across

Art of Riding

#3 dressagewannabe

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 08:25 PM

Thank you so much, I think that the section about weight aids answered my questions, I am going out tomorrow to experiment some more.

#4 luvin these horses

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 08:27 PM

my trainer did grand prix and the cue she always uses for her horse to canter is outside leg behind the girth and nudge with your inside

#5 RioTollerAgain

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 06:15 AM

I don't want to completely rule out that your schoolmaster is lazy, but remember that just because a horse was trained to such and such a level does NOT necessarily mean he is easy to ride. Some horses, regardless of their level of training, are much less tolerant of inconsistant or incorrect aids than others.

I definitely think you can improve the horse by improving your riding.

Before answering further, I'm going to take a look at the website suggested. I probably don't need to add anything....

#6 TracyA

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 07:01 AM

Rio, I suspect that highly trained horses are HARDER to ride. They know what a correct cue is, and keep waiting for us to figure out how to ask the correct question. The hardest horse to ride is one who does exactly what I ask, not what I *think* I'm asking. [Smile]

DW, best of luck figuring out Dolorich's buttons.

Tracy

#7 Beckham03

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 12:51 PM

When I got my Prix St george schoolmaster the hardest thing for me was to get him to canter. He does have a different cue then my other horses...I always ended up with a hauches in. He is hard to keep in front of the leg as well and if you don't ask him correctly, he will ignore you. As someone mentioned above, his cue is outside leg back and inside hip forward. A friend of mine who bought a Grand Prix schoolmaster said it took her a half hour to get him to canter the first time:-) I recommend working with your trainer; that is what got me through it:-) [Big Grin] [Big Grin]

#8 RioTollerAgain

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 01:22 PM

quote:
Originally posted by TracyA:
Rio, I suspect that highly trained horses are HARDER to ride. They know what a correct cue is, and keep waiting for us to figure out how to ask the correct question. The hardest horse to ride is one who does exactly what I ask, not what I *think* I'm asking.

You are exactly correct! lol

I remember, years and years ago, the first time I was given the opportunity to ride a Grand Prix horse. He was my instructor's horse and unlike some other Grand Prix horses, he was definitely very forward and light on the driving aids. Actually, he was light on the aids. Period. I had no trouble getting him to canter. I had no trouble getting flying lead changes.

I had a ton of trouble riding a 20 meter circle on one lead. Every time I allowed my weight to shift even a tiny bit he said, "Oh! Flying lead change! Got it!" And we'd be in counter canter.

It took me a whole lesson to learn to control my own body enough to complete a 20 meter circle on the correct lead without flying lead changes.

What a learning experience!

#9 luvin these horses

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 04:12 PM

yeah, my trainer actually thought it would be funny if i got on her old prix st. george horse, but he really taught my some things about my body weight and correctness of cues... but i eventually got it.

#10 dressagewannabe

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 05:07 PM

Rio and Tracy.... Thanks so much, and I agree full heartedly. He is so much harder to ride than my other guy. I know that I need to spend more time figuring out his buttons, but I think the weight thing may be the hardest thing to learn.

Beckham... I have got the haunches in down! That is exactly whet happens as soon as I put that outside leg on him, no trouble there!

#11 ilovedobby

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 07:54 PM

Thanks for asking this dressagewannabe!! I apperciate you asking this very very much b/c I came on to post A VERY SIMIlAR thing! I, also, am having trouble getting the gelding I ride into a canter. He is a low level dressage horse who is known to be lazy (but randomly wild) yet comfortable. I am/was used to just popping down my leg and giving a little kick into the corner and into a canter, but NOOOO. He won't canter unless you do what my trainer is trying to teach me to do correctly: She described it as putting your leg back and really down, and pushing in and up under his ribcage.
Yeah, well, we are trying to improve getting into that canter...I haven't ridden in exactly 14 days although I was at the barn today, I didn't have the time or chance too, but I know and remember (and keep struggling) on how it was embrassingly hard for me to get a smooth transition into the canter.
Ah, well, enough about me. I know that he (the gelding) is stubborn, often lazy, unfit, and knows what he should be told, so when I tell him incorrectly or not firmly enough/consitently enough, he will fight me or not to it at all.
Good luck! I hope I can get better too....