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Rearing Barrel Horses


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#1 Guest__*

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:02 AM

Okay so ive been told, im not the only barrel racer who's horses rear at shows and although everyone tells me they've gone through the "rearing stage" with their barrel horses no one can really tell me how to stop it completely.

i've got this wonderful mare Lily who has just recently turned 6 and ever since she was 4 years old shes reared and refused to go into the chute, her rears get worse and worse everytime too. she gets to the point where she doesnt care if she lands on someone or not, but once shes through the chute she runs the cleanest set of barrels and always clocks a nice time. local shows around me she does not rear or throw a fuss but it seems the bigger the show, the bigger the rears. and i've had many trainers tell me its because im nevervous and i need to relax and what not, and i do. is there a calming supplement or something to get her to relax at shows? im mean riding around at our barn shes a perfect angel. i'll put an 8 year old boy on her and send her for a walk down the street and she'll walk with her head held nice down the street and back.
has anyone ever had a problem with rearing horses like this?

and i also just recently purchased a 15 year old barrel horse who had been layed of for over 2 years because he had flipped his rider over and she was very timid of him afterwards. mind you the reason he flipped was being she was standing in a corner with him gabbing to another friend and he turned around to nibble her stirrup and his bridle got caught and spooked him. he runs a nice set of barrels and he's the sweetest horse around but impatiant. and when he wants to go, he'll do little mini rears, which are fun althought if you dont correct them right away the get bigger and more dangerous. so when we need to stand and wait for our turn to run i always tend to find myself see-sawing on his mouth or spinning him in circles so he wont rear.i'd just like him to stand quietly so i can focus on what i need to do when we run so i dont mess him up. funny thing is, after he runs he puts his head down and walks out like hes a perfect angel.

we've got two pretty big shows comming up.
ones in New Jersey next weekend and then we have one in VA two weeks after that,
and i was wondering if anyone maybe had some suggestions or advise to help calm these guys down it would help alot.
my trainer, who is a wonderful trainer i might add, is terified to get on my mare even just riding quiet at our barn, and i dont blame her, if i didnt know and trust Lily 100% i be scared of her too.
anyways thank you so much for your time,
hope to hear back soon
<333333

#2 charliehorse80

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:09 AM

wow, you just wrote about my horse, too! hope you get a reply, I have some big shows coming up also. He will usually let someone lead me in, but that is a real pain if no one came with you and you dont know anyone there at the show...

#3 runstraithome

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:11 AM

A horse like that isnt worth riding nor owning in my opinion...... Dont you think its a sign if your trainer is scared of the horse??

To me, you better be saying a lot of prayers.... No matter how much you trust a horse or a horse trusts you.... you should never trust a rearer or be on one in my opinion.

#4 jokerscowgirl

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:12 AM

Joker has done the rearing thing a time or two and I have to say if they ever recast the Lone Ranger's horse as a bay, I'm taking him to audition!
The only thing I can say on Lily is that most likely you are tensing up or worrying about getting in the gate. Joker can tell when he's going to run by my actions in the saddle, but if I just sit there like we're going to walk in the arena and walk back out, he'll go in calmly. It's hard to make yourself calm down, but as soon as you worry, the horse worries 10X more. Also make sure your reins are pushed forward on her neck so she has a 'hole' and the 'hole' is the arena gate.

#5 TurninNBurnin

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:13 AM

quote:
Originally posted by runstraithome:
A horse like that isnt worth riding nor owning in my opinion...... Dont you think its a sign if your trainer is scared of the horse??

To me, you better be saying a lot of prayers.... No matter how much you trust a horse or a horse trusts you.... you should never trust a rearer or be on one in my opinion.

I agree, there are too many good horses out there to waste time with something thats scaring the crap out of everyone...

#6 Three*C*Champs

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:14 AM

After going over the usual....possible pain? tack not fitting? etc.

Both my barrel geldings reared....well my 3 year old isn't completly over the stage yet.

Cowboy was the rearing King when I got him.(Not to mention a bucking PRO) He gave me whiplash at one show and I was out of riding for two weeks... [Eek!] We were doing a time only run and he attempted to run home, I asked him to slow down, not harsh, because it was only time only, he got frustrated and didnt understand why he couldnt run home like he knew he was suppose to and the only way he thought out was rearing.... over & over & over again, until he threw in a buck then rear, which caught air in my helmet and jerked my head back....

He began rearing whenever he decided he didnt want to do something, it was his way out of things. And I mean he wouldnt just pop off the ground, he stood straight up to where sometimes we were suprise he didn't just flip back. The solution after pain/discomfort were out of the question....a certain tie down. It's a dream [Angel] The first time that hit it all four hit the ground, and it's not even that harsh!

My 3 year old started after seeing my mare rearing in her stall....I was going to get on him one day and he reared up, ended up throwing me back on my back...little butthead. He now does as well when he doesnt want to do something...last friday at our lesson he had other things on his mind walking next to a mare (go figure) and when I asked him to turn the other direction away from her he got made and reared. He didnt get away with it and I won...

I did ride him for a while with the tie-down, but my trainer suggested since he is younger to try and train him out of it first. We've been working on mounting with his head turned slightly to one side, etc., and it's been working like a charm....but he still pops up when he doesnt want to do something...

Right before Cowboy went off barrels from his quarter crack I had just started running him after about 2-3 years without a tie-down. Up til' then he still reared when he got excited, frustrated...or just felt like it. Before the break, he was running great without the tie down....

Just all depends I guess of how long you have to use one. If interested in the kind of tie-down I can post a link to one...

Good Luck & Best of Wishes [Smiley Wavey]

#7 rodeocowgurl

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:17 AM

I dont know what I would do about the first horse because once a horse rears like that its hard to get them to stop.
But the second horse, the 15 yr old, I think maybe it would be good to warm him up and when you take him up to the arena just get off of him and hand walk him in circles or just let him stand still all together as long as its not to long before you run. The more you pull and see saw on his mouth the more it is going to make him mad and possibly make him start rearing worse.
My horse doesnt want to stand still a lot next to the alley and will get to hot so I will just get off of her and lead her mostly just b/c its a pain in the rear to keep pulling on her mouth and her still keep moving around.

#8 Three*C*Champs

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:22 AM

Then again...after rereading it I dont think my horses rearing are as server (sp?) since they have never flipped...nor do they do it at a show (with the exception of Cowboy at the time only).... [Question]

#9 Jenbabe

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:26 AM

Prior to my runs I tend to get nervous. So I just step off of my horse until it's my turn so he doesn't sense my nervousness. I just let him stand until a couple before me, and then I get on. If you need to keep your horse moving, then hand-walk him until it's your turn to go. Once you get in the saddle, start singing a little tune. If you sing then your breathing rate stays the same, and you won't tense up as much, also helping your horse to stay calm.

I will not deal with a horse that rears. I will probably get flamed for this, but if my horses rear they get a pop on the top of their head. That way they know that if they come up they are going to be punished for it. I do not beat them, they just get popped.

Your horse needs to know that he can relax. Take him to barrel races and never run him. Just exhibition at a walk or trot. Take him to a fun show or horse show and do western pleasure, etc. Walk your horse into the gate when they are dragging the arena - if this is permitted - and just sit in the gate. Do anything you can to let your horse know that when he goes into the arena it is fun and enjoyable, and that he can relax.

Hope some of these ideas help you out. But please fix this problem immediately so that your horse doesn't hurt you or someone else.

#10 barrelracer111

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:35 AM

There is not enough money in the world to get me to get on a horse that is known to rear. They can buck all they want but the rearers are the ones that will kill you someday.

If I have a horse that gets so much as 1' off the ground in the front, they are in serious trouble!

If the trainer is afraid, I think I'd see about a new job for the horse. But, that is JMHO.

#11 ShirtMaker

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:38 AM

We had a horse that reared before. A great horse but when he was sick of his job and didn't want to go in the gate, he reared up. My daughter handled it like a pro didn't phase her at all. Here is two things we tried. I'm not sure if what we did fixed him or he just fixed himself. First we bought this tie down that is cable and it goes over the top of their head behind the ears and then around their nose. Can't remember what it's called. Then before the race: We'd warm him up, take off his bridle, loosen him up and tie him up away from the arena. Let his mind relax. About 10 before she ran, we'd get him ready, stretch him out warm up a little, and then park him somewhere near the gate, with the noise he knows it's getting ready to happen but knows it's not his turn. THEN when it's his turn, she picks up the over and under and before she asks him to move she wacks him one on each side, not really hard but just enough to get his attention. Between those two things he stopped rearing.

#12 KatyMay

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:43 AM

Start doing a lot of slow work in the arena with the barrels set up.
NEVER EVER "see-saw" on your horses mouth to discourage rearing. It's doing the opposite. When that horse rears, lean as far foward as you can, lean on her neck and SPUR her!
You need to make her realize rearing is not acceptable. I would never put a tie-down on a horse to cure rearing.
Honestly I would find myself a different horse. I had the joy of running one in high school. Big gray throughbred mare. She flipped over one day on me at home, three cracked ribs and a bruised kidney later she found herself in the kill pen. (FLAME AWAY [Yay] ).

I'll take a bucker over a horse that rears any day!

#13 Guest__*

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:48 AM

wowow
i didnt think i'd get so many responses and so quickly. thank you so much.

althought im still a little puzzle as to what i should do.
getting rid of these horses and getting new ones is out of the question thats for sure. you'd have to really see me with my horses to understand why im being so patient with this whole rearing thing and why they still havent shaken me out of my boots.

i have gone through numerous vet checks with Lily and she did come up with Ulcers last season but their long gone and shes on medication to prevent them from comming back.
and leading her into the arena causes even more problems cause one little tug sends her up in the air.
as for my trainer not getting on her, i tottaly understand this because shes got horses of her own and a family she needs to be here for, god forbid my horse ever did flip over i wouldnt be able to forgive myslef for letting her on in the first place.

as for legend your probally right about just getting off and stand with him until its just about our turn, and our two shows we have comming up hes going as a tag along for lily and will just be ridden around so he gets a feel for what hes missed for over 2 years.

#14 runstraithome

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:50 AM

quote:
Originally posted by KatyMay:
Start doing a lot of slow work in the arena with the barrels set up.
NEVER EVER "see-saw" on your horses mouth to discourage rearing. It's doing the opposite. When that horse rears, lean as far foward as you can, lean on her neck and SPUR her!
You need to make her realize rearing is not acceptable. I would never put a tie-down on a horse to cure rearing.
Honestly I would find myself a different horse. I had the joy of running one in high school. Big gray throughbred mare. She flipped over one day on me at home, three cracked ribs and a bruised kidney later she found herself in the kill pen. (FLAME AWAY [Yay] ).

I'll take a bucker over a horse that rears any day!

I just told Turnin that if I have a rearer.... new desination is... pedigree, alpo, Old Roy's, Kibbles N Bits... Super Glue.....

You get my drift. No flaming by me, becuase the killer pen is the best place for them.

#15 runstraithome

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:53 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Lily's living Legend:
wowow

getting rid of these horses and getting new ones is out of the question thats for sure. you'd have to really see me with my horses to understand why im being so patient with this whole rearing thing and why they still havent shaken me out of my boots.

.

Even if I see it.... I will still have the same answer. I think you are asking for injuries and to be honest someone who will risk hurting themselves on the horses they love is silly to me. If your horses trusted you so much.... why would they rear? If you are so patient.... why hasnt it solved the problem then?

Answer still the same, there is no good place for a rear.

#16 Guest__*

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:54 AM

ShirtMaker --
your daughter sounds like me.
my horses rears dont fase me a bit because i trust them 100% to no flip me over.
and your idea sounds like a good one.
although my mare tends to shut down a bit when whipped and kicked.

as for the see-sawing i dont do it with my mare.
i do it with Legend, the impatient one who cant stand still, it gives me something else to think about and he just lowers his head and seems to enjoy it.

i ride them both in a light tendor touch bit, and i school Lily in a sweet 6 bit every once in a while so she softens up.

#17 TurninNBurnin

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:58 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Lily's living Legend:
ShirtMaker --
your daughter sounds like me.
my horses rears dont fase me a bit because i trust them 100% to no flip me over.
and your idea sounds like a good one.
although my mare tends to shut down a bit when whipped and kicked.

as for the see-sawing i dont do it with my mare.
i do it with Legend, the impatient one who cant stand still, it gives me something else to think about and he just lowers his head and seems to enjoy it.

i ride them both in a light tendor touch bit, and i school Lily in a sweet 6 bit every once in a while so she softens up.

You may TRUST your horse to never fall on you, BUT what if he LOOSES BALANCE

Never would I EVER tolerate a horse to rear, I give it the big ADIOS AMIGO!

#18 runstraithome

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:59 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Lily's living Legend:
ShirtMaker --
your daughter sounds like me.
my horses rears dont fase me a bit because i trust them 100% to no flip me over.
.

I have to say this.... give your head a shake. What if that horse lost his footing? I know a girl who was put into a comma because her horse fell over backwards. You are being absolutly dumbfounded about this. Take a step back and ask yourself how important is your health? Is it worth breaking your neck, back, ribs etc? Or going into a comma?

I dont care how much you trust them that is just the most ignorant statement I have ever heard.

#19 Guest__*

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:00 AM

oops i made a typo

as for the see-sawing i dont do it with my mare.
i do it with Legend, the impatient one who cant stand still, it gives HIM something else to think about and he just lowers his head and seems to enjoy it.

#20 KatyMay

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:00 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Lily's living Legend:
[QB]
my horses rears dont fase me a bit because i trust them 100% to no flip me over.
QB]

Trust isn't an issue with rearing. A rearing horse is not thinking "Okay, I'm just rearing for the fun of it, I refuse to flip over". Flipping over is an accident on the horses part. They want to flip over no more than you do. It's when they misgauge that "harmless" rear that they flip. It's not "if" it happens, it's when.

#21 barrelracer34

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:04 AM

I have my grey gelding who doesnt do the extreme rearing but he does do it when he gets hyper and oi wont let him go. We have tryed popping him between the ears when he does it but he doesnt very nuch appriciate that. So i just go with the flow and try and relax. Also i just went and bought an 11 year ld gelding from my trainer who has a bad rearing problem he does it with her but i cant get him to do it with me. He walks in perfectly, Untill the other day he did it and that when we got the egg and cracked it on his head. Sundown fell to the ground. Im guessing he thought he was dyijng is what my trainer said. Also i would not advice selling the horses give them a chance.

#22 Guest__*

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:05 AM

well the reason i trust them so much with their rears is because Lilys rears can get pretty bad but they have never even come close to the point where she could flip over.
and i believe in giving horses a few chances to work out their flaws before i give up completely.
but i do apriciate your input.
im hard headed and stubborn and giving up these horses is tottaly out of the question. and Legends rears are very easy to overcome,
and people have told me that i just have to be patient will lily and just wait until she matures a tad bit more.
and i do no barrel work unless in a show.

#23 TurninNBurnin

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:06 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Lily's living Legend:
well the reason i trust them so much with their rears is because Lilys rears can get pretty bad but they have never even come close to the point where she could flip over.
and i believe in giving horses a few chances to work out their flaws before i give up completely.
but i do apriciate your input.
im hard headed and stubborn and giving up these horses is tottaly out of the question. and Legends rears are very easy to overcome,
and people have told me that i just have to be patient will lily and just wait until she matures a tad bit more.
and i do no barrel work unless in a show.

Why did you post this topic then? 99.5% of us on here will not deal with a rearer, or at least tahts what I get out of it... [Confused]

#24 theblue0utlaw

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:08 AM

I think the general population of the barrel board is going to think the same way. Rearing is badbadBAD. A horse that rears gets three chances with me.. and ONLY because there could be something medically bothering the horse. If you have ruled out pain.. and your patient training hasn't cured this mare.. Send her down the road before we read about your death on BHW or something. Jeeze, use your brain before it becomes smashed against the ground because your horse flipped!!!!

<3

#25 Guest__*

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:20 AM

i posted because i wanted to see if anyone else has had this problem and i wanted to know what they did to solve it.

im looking more for training advice, or maybe a calming suplement or something.

im not looking for the best "kill buy" auction to send them to. thats not even an opition.

but i do apriciate the input and advise that you all have been giving

#26 theblue0utlaw

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:32 AM

Here's two training ideas for yah.

The first one I have tried myself and it has worked about 75 - 80 % of the time. Crack multiple eggs over her head as HARD as you can as soon as she pops off the ground. (Many eggs at the same time will give her a more blood feeling than just one egg.)

The next one I've seen done but I have never done myself. This has cured the other 15 - 20 % percent of the horses I couldn't cure with the eggs. Connect two lunge lines, one to either side of the bit. Have one helper hold each line. Have the bravest and quickest person you know get on your mare and try to make her rear. As soon as she comes up high enough, have the rider slide off the mare and have your helpers jerk her over backwards. Usually, if it doesn't break their retarded necks, it will cure them of rearing. It scares them bad enough that they don't want to come off the ground again. I have seen many rearers flipped and it cured them.. haven't yet lost one to a broken neck.

If those don't work, and your horse is the other 5%.. the horse down the road, they're not worth your life. Point blank. Simple Period.

Like I said, it'd be a shame to read about you on the news because your horse flipped over on you at a huge barrel race and crushed your head and face to pieces.
<3

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<3

#27 justrace

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:41 AM

Okay, I have a couple questions. First, for Lily, at what age was she started on barrels? You stated that she has been rearing at the gate from 4 years old. That implys to me that she was started at least 3 years or so. In my opinion it sounds like she was started too young and pushed to quickly. If she has had ulcers, she also might be relating the gate to past issues of pain. I would rule out pain first and then if she is sound, it seems like she needs to be taken off the barrels for a while. I agree with getting rid of horses that rear, but obviously you are going to keep her, so I hope that you would take her off the barrels and only do trail riding and other things with her for quite a while and then start her back very slow and easy.
Now my first question with Legend is why would you buy a horse that rears and has flipped on his previous owner? I know that you stated the reason he flipped, but that just shows how easily it can happen. I would never buy a horse that has a history with flipping, regardless of the reasoning behind it. Now that you own him, I would definitly rule out all pain issues and again work very slowly with him.
Supplements are not going to solve the issues that you are having with these horse IMO. Everyone on this board is just trying to look out for you and your safety, not trying to be cruel.

#28 Guest__*

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 12:15 PM

Well if you'd like to PM me regarding my accident from my horse rearing & flipping over on top of me,be my guest.Lets just say I am still recovering 3 months later.Had a pinched nerve in my neck.Took 2 injections to fix & just a few weeks ago had surgery because the hematoma I had in my abdoman from the saddle hitting me when she flipped turned into an abcess.That was worse than the accident itself.The pain of taking out the stuffing "sponges & gause" was the worst.Being hooked up to a vaccume to suck all the crap out of my incission was the pitts.
Will I ride her again, NO. Get rid of the rearing horse.Not worth it.I could of been killed or crippled.By the grace of God I wasn't.For those who take rearing lightly,grow up.It's not to be taken lightly.There is NO EXCUSE for rearing.So don't make excuses for your horse.

[ 07-26-2006, 01:16 PM: Message edited by: okhorselover ]

#29 Guest__*

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 01:45 PM

thanks for you input.
and i do understand your saying all this for my safety and im taking everything your saying into consideration.

for the questions you asked,
Lily was broke as a ranch horse in missouri (sp?)
and came to my barn as a 3 year old where my trainer bought her and started her off on barrels, once lily turned 4 and had the pattern set in her head i bought her off my trainer and first just started trucking her to shows to get to know the scene and when she was almost 5 my trainer and my vet said it was safe to start running her so thats what i did. then the rearing began at the last few shows of the season. i finished out the season cause there was no physical sign of her being in pain and my vet marked her sound. once the season was over i had numerous tests done EPM ect. and we find she had a slight case of ulcers caused by stress. but thats long gone now.she had the whole winter off. and shes on special feed and medication to make sure they dont come back.

as for buying Legend, this horse has great potential and a great heart for this sport. and hes smart too.

its hard to describe my horses VIA internet,if you ever saw them you'd understand a little bit better why im being so hard headed with them

#30 lilcwgrll

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 01:57 PM

this is a big issue for me....my horse has this problem sometime....he is a quarter horse that used to be raced...he is very powerful and strong....in the 2 years that i have had him before goin in he has either walked right in or reared up....i have noticed that when he walks in the pen he does not fire and doesn't clock fast times...on the other hand...when he rears up before running he smokes them every time....i run at NBHA's and Rodeos....most often we run slow times at nbha's and win money at rodeos....he will rear 75% of the time at a rodeo but im winnin more money! so whats up with that..?!?!?!