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Horse that Roars?


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#1 NikkiS

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 11:40 AM

A lady at the barn recently bought a Holsteiner that makes a ton of noise during work, he is super windy. Lady says when she bought him owner said he was a roarer when he is out of shape...??? Can anyone explain this to me?

Thanks!

#2 IrishJumper

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 03:34 PM

I had a Trakehener mare that was a roarer. She really only did it when I'd jump or if we schooled upper level dressage movements. The higher the jumps would get the louder she'd roar. If we just did flat work or lower level dressage she would remain quiet. If she got anxious she'd roar. And for her when she was in shape she'd stay quiet longer. When I first bought her she was out of shape and man she could make noise.

Here's a link to an technical explaination to it. Roaring article

Edited b/c I forgot the link [Duh]

[ 03-21-2008, 04:35 PM: Message edited by: IrishJumper ]

#3 RockSolid

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 03:44 PM

Marly's a roarer. It's only evident when he's nervous, when he's been cantering or jumping for a while, or when we're galloping or going cross-country. To be perfectly honest, I don't notice it anymore.

#4 Jump_4_Joy

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 05:38 PM

My friend almost bought a horse that roared. She didn't because hunter judges dont like it.
Horses "roar" when there is a problem with their flapper. It's something with the flapper in their throat that doesnt work correctly. It can be fixed but sometimes it comes back. Sorry for the vague explaination, a vet explained it to me like 5 years ago.

#5 RockSolid

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 07:12 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Jump_4_Joy:
My friend almost bought a horse that roared. She didn't because hunter judges dont like it.
Horses "roar" when there is a problem with their flapper. It's something with the flapper in their throat that doesnt work correctly. It can be fixed but sometimes it comes back. Sorry for the vague explaination, a vet explained it to me like 5 years ago.

Roaring can't "come back" if it's surgically fixed. I forget the exact terminology, but there are two flaps, and one is usually paralyzed which makes the roaring noise. The surgery is called "tie-back surgery" because the paralyzed flap is "tied back" so it doesn't get in the way and create the noise. However, having it tied back puts the horse at more risk for inhaling food and water...etc...

But yeah. Once fixed, it's fixed.

#6 Jump_4_Joy

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 07:21 PM

quote:
Originally posted by RockSolid:
quote:
Originally posted by Jump_4_Joy:
My friend almost bought a horse that roared. She didn't because hunter judges dont like it.
Horses "roar" when there is a problem with their flapper. It's something with the flapper in their throat that doesnt work correctly. It can be fixed but sometimes it comes back. Sorry for the vague explaination, a vet explained it to me like 5 years ago.

Roaring can't "come back" if it's surgically fixed. I forget the exact terminology, but there are two flaps, and one is usually paralyzed which makes the roaring noise. The surgery is called "tie-back surgery" because the paralyzed flap is "tied back" so it doesn't get in the way and create the noise. However, having it tied back puts the horse at more risk for inhaling food and water...etc...

But yeah. Once fixed, it's fixed.

Oh well then I stand corrected...
Here is a website that explains it more..
http://www.thoroughbredtimes.com/horse-hea...ar-the-air.aspx

#7 Shalyn04

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 07:22 PM

A friend of mine bought a roarer for her junior jumper a few years ago and they had the tie-back surgery done. I helped the roaring, but in the long run it did more harm than good. He started dropping weight and stopped eating. They concluded that it was because of the tie back surgery that he stopped eating, and it hurt him to swallow.

#8 Mith

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 08:15 PM

Roaring is the unilateral or bilateral paralysis of the larynx. There are a few treatments, they can surgically tie back the one side, both sides, or both sides and the soft palate. The more that is tied back, the more complications that can arise. There is also a newer Laser Cordectomy procedure-but I don't know a whole lot about that. The horses usually still have serious respitory problems and I personally wouldn't buy one for any serious showing or work. Many times the post surgery cough and/or scaring make it impossible for the horse to work.
ETA: it has nothing to do with the physical fitness of an animal, but is a medical condition and it is true that many hunter, driving, and gated horse judges will not even consider placing a roarer as riding one is considered dangerious in many levels (if they can't get enough air then they fall down)

[ 03-21-2008, 09:20 PM: Message edited by: Mith ]

#9 RockSolid

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 08:00 AM

It all really depends on the severity of the roaring. There have been plenty of horses that have evented upper levels that also roar, as well as horses that have had tie-back surgery and went on to event top levels. Getting around a four-star cross-country course surely counts as a respiratorily intense activity.

There are also horses that roar so badly they can't get sufficient air. It's case by case.

#10 IrishJumper

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 10:29 AM

I've been on racehorses that have had the tie back surgery. Most of the time it's very sucessful. But there are times the horse "suffers" for it. It just doesn't help them any. I mean they stop roaring but their performance isn't helped any. We just had one last summer and he'd have to drink his water with his head down and eat with his head down or he'd choke on it. Poor guy. Nice horse and he could run but the last 1/8 of a mile he'd choke...he just couldn't get enough air. But he never made noise after having the surgery.

#11 The Blue Bullet

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 09:51 PM

quote:
Originally posted by RockSolid:
But yeah. Once fixed, it's fixed.

That is not entirely true if a tie back is done. Generally when a horse is a roarer, the left arytnoid is the arytnoid affected. During a tie back the affected arytnoid is tied back with a suture. This suture can easily come loose/break and you will be right back where you started.

With my mare I chose to have an arytnoidectomy done instead of a tie back. It is permanent comparted to the tie back in that the arytnoid is removed.

To the original poster, the horse will roar whether or not he is in shape. The horse should have been scoped prior to purchasing him to determine how severe his case is especially since the seller was upfront with the horse having the issue. I was not told about it prior to buying my horse, and when trying her we never made her work hard enough to make her roar (she was not very broke and underweight at the time). It also can get worse as they age.

#12 RockSolid

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 09:55 PM

quote:
Originally posted by The Blue Bullet:
quote:
Originally posted by RockSolid:
But yeah. Once fixed, it's fixed.

That is not entirely true if a tie back is done. Generally when a horse is a roarer, the left arytnoid is the arytnoid affected. During a tie back the affected arytnoid is tied back with a suture. This suture can easily come loose/break and you will be right back where you started.
You are right. I meant if the surgery is done properly and there are no post-op complications like loose sutures. The point I was trying to make was that roaring is not like a tumor; once surgery is done it doesn't really "come back" unless the surgery fails. [Smile]