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Another Saddle for Jack I GOT IT!! COME LOOK!!


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#1 AKPonyGirl

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 10:36 PM

This one is anoher Hamley but I don't see a maker's mark. Let me know what you think.

It seems as though you have created a "monster" about this saddle stuff. I love the old ones.

[ 11-20-2007, 09:00 PM: Message edited by: AKPonyGirl ]

#2 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 12:29 AM

Well, I think it's invisible, 'cause I don't see a picture. An un-marked Hamley? I find that hard to believe.

I have a long story about an un-marked "Hamley," but will keep my yap shut unless you want to hear the tale. It's one of those "I Made Out Like a Bandit in the End" stories!

#3 spanish_walkin_wannabe

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 12:30 AM

pssst... I see invisible pictures... [Eek!] j/k. [Big Grin]

#4 AKPonyGirl

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 11:04 PM

Oh, well. I have one of those so-called "unmarked" Hamely's. [Big Grin]

However, along with liking old saddles, I like stories. Tell us the story!

#5 blonde on a warmblood

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 11:19 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Jack Baumgartner:


I have a long story about an un-marked "Hamley," but will keep my yap shut unless you want to hear the tale. It's one of those "I Made Out Like a Bandit in the End" stories!

oh yes please, please, PLEASE tell us a story Uncle Jack!!

[Jump] [Jump] [Jump]

#6 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 02:00 AM

Heather, Is that you? Haven't seen you on a coon's age! [Huggy] [Smiley Wavey]

Okay, here's the story. I guess I met Jimmy in the late 40's. He moved to our little village with his mom and new stepfather. The stepfather, "Old Sarge," as we called him, was head of the local Srate Police barracks. He could be pretty stern, but Jimmy would just go to live with his grandparents North Carolina for a while when things got tough.

Jimmy liked to hang around me, despite the two or three years difference in our ages. He tried to copy me as much as he could. Made me feel funny. Every thing I did, he was going to do.

Fast forward to the late 50's. Jimmy saw me driving my brother's Jaguar XK140 roadster, and he had to get one. He found an older XK120, and tried to get me to co-sign for him. Uh-uh! He drove an old '49 Chevy, but began telling girls that he owned a Jaguar. [Confused] When they found out he was lying, he caught a lot of flak.

In early '62 I joined the Air Force. Damned if he didn't join three weeks later. He got out on a medical after five weeks. When I'd come home on leave, he'd ask all about what I was doing. Most of what I did as a photogrametric/cartographic analyst, was working with aerial photograpy from spy aircraft to make bombing charts. Since most of it was Secret or Top Secret, I could speak about it only in general terms.

When I got out of the Air Force, I went to work at the same place as Jimmy. It turned out that he'd told everyone that he'd been a photomapper in the Air Force and unloaded the film from Voodoo aircraft. I wasn't allowed anywhere near one of those planes! Funny.

I worked the 4 to midnight shift, so I got a day job as a groom at the racetrack. I bought a horse to possibly use as a pony horse. Damned if Jimmy didn't have to go buy a horse. He was in way over his head and didn't know squat, but that never seemed to bother him. I had a new Bona Allen steer roping saddle. Jimmy asked me to help him find a saddle. I took him to old Dan, a local horsetrader. Danny had some new, cheap rent string type saddles, but Jimmy wanted a big old rig like mine.

One day Danny came to where I kept my horse and said he had a big old rig, a Hamley. Go find my friend. When we pulled in at Danny's, the saddle was sitting on a stand just outside his garage. The shape of the saddle was familiar to me, but all the ones I'd ridden were roughout. This one was highly tooled, and had matching tooled saddledbags and big tapaderos. Before we got out of the car, I told Jimmy to make up his mind fast, 'cause if he didn't want the saddle, I did. That's all it took.

He bought the saddle, for $125.00, $100 of which I lent him. I told him if he ever decided to sell it, I'd like first crack at it. It didn't carry the Hamley maker's mark. Good reason - it was an unmarked Bona Allen. I kept that information to myself.

Time went by and the birds sang, and by the early 70's he was in my pocket pretty deep. In lieu of payment, I took his two Appaloosas and his in-line trailer, some other things like clippers and such. He wouldn't part with his "Hamley" saddle. He was out of the horse business. He'd been kicked out of so many stables it wasn't funny.

Late 70's. The phone rang. It was Jimmy. "Hey, you always liked that Hamley saddle. Still interested?" "Sure, bring it over. How much do you want?" He didn't know, but he couldn't bring it over. "Mom and Sarge are up from Florida and the saddle's at their place. I can't go there when Sarge is around. Can you go get it and meet me somewhere?" "Sure, no prob."

It was all dried out and gnarly, dusty as ****, but it was good to go otherwise. I threw it in the back of the pickup and met Jimmy in the parking lot of a restaurant. How much did he want? He said it ought to be worth something, make an offer. I took out a $100 bill and told him I'd give that. He hesitated. I carried it to his car, opened the door and acted like I was going to throw that dusty thing on his black front seat. "No, no! Okay, I'll take the hundred."

I took it apart and gave it a complete re-conditioning, including new fleece on the skirts. The tooling was the same as on my Bona Allen. I have a catalog with the saddle in there. It was called the "Wheel and Deal Cutter." Helluva rig, all clean and shiny.

Sometime in the 80's, I brought the saddle in to clean, oil and shine it up. It was still sitting on a stand in the kitchen when Mike showed up. Mike fancied himself a cowboy. How much did I want for the saddle? He'd like to get it for his dad. I told him it wasn't for sale. "C'mon, Jack, everything has a price." I told him I wouldn't take less than $700.00. He and his dad were back the next day with the money. Bye, saddle.

Not much later, I was at the stable where they boarded. Mike's dad, Cecil, told me the damned saddlebags and tapaderos made the saddle too heavy for him to throw on a horse. Could I find him some leather-bound stirrups? Yep! Someone had given me a brand-new pair of deep roper stirrups. Nice ones. I took 'em over. I told Cecil I'd just trade the stirrups for the saddlebags. Done.

I removed the stirrups with the taps and put the others on. Cecil had to leave. I asked him what he had to have for the tapaderos. "Whatever Mike says," he replied. Mike said he'd sell them for $25.00. Done!

Later on, Charlie, a collector, came over to buy a silver-mounted bit. He saw the saddlebags and tapaderos hanging in my tackroom. "How much?" I told him $300.00 for both. Bingo! So, for a $125.00 investment, I made a tidy profit.

Profit ain't a dirty word! Funny, sometimes I just give something away, if I like the person. [Confused]
[Big Grin]

[ 11-18-2007, 02:07 AM: Message edited by: Jack Baumgartner ]

#7 AKPonyGirl

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 03:54 AM

Thanks, Jack. You are such a good story teller. But I like the fact that they are real stories.

#8 Equosamo

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 09:21 AM

I love your stories! Wow, that's really nice.

#9 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 11:37 AM

quote:
Originally posted by AKPonyGirl:
Thanks, Jack. You are such a good story teller. But I like the fact that they are real stories.

Thank you. I believe everyone has some true stories to tell, but they seem to think people will say they're making them up.

Example: I was telling of how I got a really scared horse to join up with me in a five-acre pasture by letting the horse think it was his idea. One of the guys said, "What do you do, lay awake all night making this stuff up?" Nope! Life is much more interesting than fiction.

Edited to say - If you'd like to read about the scared horse, I posted it on the thread "A Little sumthin, sumthin for Jack Baumgartner...", posted by Paint Horse Kate. It's a two-parter, and begins on page 39 of the thread and continues on page 40. It was a gray half-Arab I'd bought at the horse auction. He found a really happy home.

[ 11-18-2007, 11:49 AM: Message edited by: Jack Baumgartner ]

#10 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 07:03 PM

Bumpin' this up.

#11 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 04:22 PM

Still waitin' for a picture of that Hamley! Pretty please? [Smiley Wavey] [Confused]

#12 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 12:02 AM

Bump, hump, clump, jump, bumpity-bump, whatever it takes to get those pictures up here.

#13 AKPonyGirl

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 03:10 AM

http://cgi.ebay.com/antique-western-saddle...1QQcmdZViewItem

I am so sorry, Jack! I didn't realize until just now that I forgot to post the link to the saddle listed on ebay!! So far we have plowed more than we did all last year and it's only November. I plowed 12 hours and had a 4-H meeting the day I posted this thread. I sincerely apologize for my oversight.

There's something else I want you to look at but I'm not gonna post it until Tuesday evening. I have a superstition about talking about something I really want before I get it. I think I jinx myself. [Big Grin]

#14 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 03:29 AM

AKPonyGirl ~ The seller seems like he's more interested in "flash" than giving us a good picture of the saddle to study. I think he's also stingy with real info, and is a BS artist about the "Hole in the Wall" and Jesse James. The saddle is from more recent vintage than he's saying.

Of course, there is a lot of BS-ing going on at ebay anyway. People who know basically zilch about saddles, trying to snow the rest of us.

I would expect to pay far less than his upset price.

#15 blonde on a warmblood

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 05:34 AM

Yeppers, 'tis I!! [Big Grin] [Huggy]
How ya be, Jack?

Nifty story, and you do know how to tell one!
Speaking of unmarked Bona Allens.... Brynn's saddle is still going strong and she loves it to death. [Huggy]

I finally found myself a nice little roper that fit both myself and "Her Royal Lardliness" [Razz]

 -
 -

I'm a bettin' you can name that saddle in under 3 seconds too!
Shirai gets the last laugh though...
 -
after all, she's got the BA that Jack provided!
[Huggy]

#16 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 06:54 AM

Blonde ~ Don't give me more credit than I deserve. That buckstitched saddle looks remarkably like a Circle Y that sits in my tackroom, awaiting repairs. It belongs to my "adapted" daughter Angela. It was her mom's saddle on the ranch in the San Joaquin Valley. Angela inherited it.

I have to give it a complete cleaning and reconditioning, then replace the fleece, put twist'n'wraps on the stirrup leathers and replace the riggin' catcher(cinch ring holder) on the off side. Luckily, I have some buckstitching leather.

Hers has a rope edge on the skirts, so it's going to be a job to do the sewing. Two extra layers of leather to contend with.

It makes me happy to hear your daughter likes the BA. [Big Grin]

Did you go and read the story on the other thread? It made me glad to see the little horse go from being scared of a human to a good little show horse in a relatively short time.

#17 AKPonyGirl

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 09:03 PM

I've been watching this Vintage Hamley Scabbard for the past few days. I wanted it very much. My husband even agreed with me! Says it will go nicely with my Hamley saddle. I didn't want to post before the auction ended.

 -

[ 11-20-2007, 09:10 PM: Message edited by: AKPonyGirl ]

#18 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 09:31 PM

Whoo-Hoo, kiddo! Think how neat it would be to have a complete outfit that was vintage and in useable condition. I get all excited when I find an old wide-cheeked headstall, old martingale or an old pair of tapaderos at an estate sale or flea market.

One trick to do with an old scabbard is to get it cleaned and while it's still wet, stick your Model 94 Winchester(which has been wrapped in Saran Wrap to protect it) inside and mold the leather to the shape of the carbine. When it dries completely, oil it good inside and out it will fit your weapon like a glove.

Good on ya! [Not Worthy]

#19 blonde on a warmblood

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 04:30 PM

quote:
Originally posted by AKPonyGirl:
I've been watching this Vintage Hamley Scabbard for the past few days. I wanted it very much. My husband even agreed with me! Says it will go nicely with my Hamley saddle. I didn't want to post before the auction ended.

 -

That's a beauty you got there AKPonyGirl!
I'm with Jack on the fitting your Winchester to the scabbard while it's still damp... but I've always used a dry cleaning bag. [ROTFL]

#20 blonde on a warmblood

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 05:17 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Jack Baumgartner:
Blonde ~ Don't give me more credit than I deserve. That buckstitched saddle looks remarkably like a Circle Y that sits in my tackroom, awaiting repairs. It belongs to my "adapted" daughter Angela. It was her mom's saddle on the ranch in the San Joaquin Valley. Angela inherited it.

I have to give it a complete cleaning and reconditioning, then replace the fleece, put twist'n'wraps on the stirrup leathers and replace the riggin' catcher(cinch ring holder) on the off side. Luckily, I have some buckstitching leather.

Hers has a rope edge on the skirts, so it's going to be a job to do the sewing. Two extra layers of leather to contend with.

It makes me happy to hear your daughter likes the BA. [Big Grin]

Did you go and read the story on the other thread? It made me glad to see the little horse go from being scared of a human to a good little show horse in a relatively short time.

Jack~ Well my dear, you're not too far off... as a matter of fact the reason I took such a liking to this saddle is because it reminded me of this Circle Y I reconditioned a few years back! The Circle Y had belonged to a friend who was in dire need of some dollars and it was just before Christmas time. I picked up the saddle which had been stored in a garage for 20 plus years. Was dry and dirty, but completely sound. cleaned the years worth of dirt and dust from it, conditioned it with Huberd's and buffed and buffed and buffed, then found a buyer for the saddle (another friend) all in 2 days time. That saddle sold for $350.00 of which I made $50.00.... still kicking myself in the *** that I didn't just buy it outright, knowing how well Circle Y's maintain their value!
Here's the Circle Y after I got done with it.
 -
 -
Anyway, when I saw my "new" saddle I was in love. I especially liked the way the rear cinch was built. Has both the original rear billets, but not the rear cinch.. I'll find one some year that's a match.
Buckstitching is such an art and looks so purdy when it's done right. Do you use beeswax on it before you lace? Always made it slide through the stitching holes easier for me without stretching or twisting. I don't envy you the rope edged fenders. How long has it been now that Angela's saddle has been sitting there awaiting your attentions?? [Razz] I seem to recall hearing about that saddle ......oh, what.... about two years ago now?
Nope, it's not a Circle Y... the horn cap should be a dead giveaway Jack ol' buddy... [Wink]

I still have yet to read your other post about the scared little horse, but I promise I'll get over there soon and give it my undevided attention... for now, I'm burning daylight, which goes way too early in the evening now and I need a good long ride!

#21 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 08:44 PM

quote:
Originally posted by blonde on a warmblood: [/]QUOTE]Jack~ Well my dear, you're not too far off... as a matter of fact the reason I took such a liking to this saddle is because it reminded me of this Circle Y I reconditioned a few years back! The Circle Y had belonged to a friend who was in dire need of some dollars and it was just before Christmas time. I picked up the saddle which had been stored in a garage for 20 plus years. Was dry and dirty, but completely sound. cleaned the years worth of dirt and dust from it, conditioned it with Huberd's and buffed and buffed and buffed, then found a buyer for the saddle (another friend) all in 2 days time. That saddle sold for $350.00 of which I made $50.00.... still kicking myself in the *** that I didn't just buy it outright, knowing how well Circle Y's maintain their value!
Here's the Circle Y after I got done with it.
 -
 -
Anyway, when I saw my "new" saddle I was in love. I especially liked the way the rear cinch was built. Has both the original rear billets, but not the rear cinch.. I'll find one some year that's a match.
Buckstitching is such an art and looks so purdy when it's done right. Do you use beeswax on it before you lace? Always made it slide through the stitching holes easier for me without stretching or twisting. I don't envy you the rope edged fenders. How long has it been now that Angela's saddle has been sitting there awaiting your attentions?? [Razz] I seem to recall hearing about that saddle ......oh, what.... about two years ago now?
Nope, it's not a Circle Y... the horn cap should be a dead giveaway Jack ol' buddy... [Wink]

I still have yet to read your other post about the scared little horse, but I promise I'll get over there soon and give it my undevided attention... for now, I'm burning daylight, which goes way too early in the evening now and I need a good long ride![/QB]

It's not the fenders that have the rope edge, but the skirts. Makes it harder with the fleece involved. Yes, Beeswax is my friend!

The horn cap isn't clear enough in the photo to give me a clue. I've seen all kinds of saddles with horn caps.

I've had Angela's saddle here for at least four years. She brought it out of a storage facility when she was making a move to Texas. She said there was no hurry. We hadn't had any conversation about it beforehand. I usually have the say about whether I'll even work on a saddle, let alone having it dumped on me. But, I love Angela like she's my own, so naturally I didn't turn her down. (Re-read my poem "Don't Lay That Thing on Me." I was angry when I wrote it, and meant every word of it. That's a whole 'nother story!)

Angela now lives in Pennsylvania and has a Saddle King of Texas saddle I sold her. She says it's the best saddle she's ever ridden. She's in no hurry for the Circle Y. Cripes, I've got about 50 saddles of my own to contend with!

If you can get ahold of old dried-up, curled up, filthy-with-dust saddles, have at 'em. I've made a bundle on some I've picked up over the years. People tell me I don't charge enough, but I'd rather sell and make something, than ask a too-high price and be stuck with it forever.

Example: A couple of years ago, I bought a 14" Ryon (of Fort Worth) show saddle at a yard sale. The woman was asking $350. She said it had been her daughters, but it had sat, covered up, in a closet fot 17 years and she needed the space. It was beautiful. I shook my head and walked away, looking at other things.

The woman said, "I'm open to offers on the saddle." I told her she wouldn't like what I'd offer. "What'll you give?" she asked. I told her I'd give $200. "How about $250?" she countered. I just shook my head again and started down the driveway. "Okay, I'll take your $200," she said.

I knew exactly who would want the saddle. A young woman I know has two little girls and had asked me to find a nice saddle. These are the type of people you don't stick with cheap junk. I oiled the stirrup leathers and shined up the surface leather.

I called the woman and told her about the saddle, and told her I'd meet her at the stable where she boarded to make sure the saddle would fit the horse, then let the girls try it. I told her I was asking $400.

The saddle fit the horse. Her girls rode it and one came to our end of the arena. "Mom, I love this saddle," she exclaimed. We walked to her truck so she could get the money from her purse. She said, "I looked up Ryon's on the internet and they have really pricey saddles. I'm not paying you enough for this saddle. Let me pay you more." I told her I was making out okay. She has already sent others looking for a saddle to me. Treating people right works for me.

And, Ryon's are pricey. I have a $3500 Ryon sitting in my living room. The master saddle maker who built it also built a custom-made saddle for a guy named George W Bush!

[ 11-24-2007, 03:15 AM: Message edited by: Jack Baumgartner ]

#22 blonde on a warmblood

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 12:06 AM

It's a Simco.
[Big Grin]

#23 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 03:38 AM

quote:
Originally posted by blonde on a warmblood:
It's a Simco.
[Big Grin]

Ha-ha! I had a Simco that I picked up at a garage sale. A little vintage barrel racer. It had the hole in the horn where a horn cap had been.

Not long after I'd met Angela, she was looking for a saddle for her daughters, Megan and Samantha. She showed me a saddle her friend had and said she wanted to get one like it from a guy who has a tack shop at his home.

It was one of those throw-away imports you can get at the horse sale for $100. I gave her a detailed look at it, pointing out what was wrong with it. I told her I'd be back with a saddle. I brought the Simco over and handed it to one of the girls, saying, "Here. Use it like you own it, and if you ever get tired of it, bring it back."

After a while, Sammy decided she wanted to try English. When they were going to make the move to Texas, rhey brought the saddle back. After they'd lived there a while and there was roping and barrel racing going on where they boarded, Sammy said she missed the little Simco. They wanted to know if I still had it how much did I want for it.

I think I told them $130 or around that much. I screwed in another horn cap before I shipped it. I think they still have it.

#24 DeLucky2

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 09:27 AM

Jack, I have a question for you if you please..... [Big Grin] You spoke in this thread about cleaning up old saddles and I was wondering what you use for saddles that are dry and in need of some TLC. My best friend bought an old saddle last year at Horse Fair and it is really dry. She is wanting to clean it up but I am not sure what to use. Plus I bought an old headstall that matches an old Bona Allen...one that you told me the make of......and I would like to clean it up and condition it as well. The headstall came from Montana and I bought the saddle locally and the tooling on them match perfect. Any info you can give me will be appreciated. Thanks.

#25 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 12:42 PM

DeLucky2 ~ A lot depends on what the item looks like to begin with, such as if it's dirty or just dried out. And if it's dirty, what kind of dirt, oily or otherwise. If it has darkened, or is stained, I might want to bleach it out with oxalic acid.

Any good cleaning solution will work, so long as you rinse the item thoroughly after cleaning it. And don't make the mistake of rubbing saddle soap into an item. Saddle soap is just that - SOAP! It needs to be made into a lather and rinsed off completely when finished. Soaps contain alkoids, which can harm leather if left on.

A good rinsing solution is vinegar water. It promotes softness when the leather dries out.

[A little side note here: A few weeks ago, I made up a Care Package of tack items to send to Prairie Rose. Among the items were two headstalls and a set of harness leather reins. I separated the headstalls into their component parts. Then I filled one side of the kitchen sink with warm water and a small amount liquid detergent and plunged the whole mess into the water. I cleaned each piece using a sponge and a toothbrush, then rinsed it off and laid it aside.

After everything was cleaned, I emptied the sink, rinsed out the sponge and refilled the sink with warm water and poured in a couple of cups of white vinegar. Again I plunged each piece into the vinegar water and went over it with the sponge to make sure it got in there good. As I took each piece out, I wiped it down good with paper towels and set it aside to dry completely through. After a few days I gave everything a treatment with Dr. Jackson's Hide Rejuvenator, a leather conditioner from Tandy/The Leather Factory. Prairie Rose said that as she spread everything out to show her family, her younger son kept sniffing a piece of the leather, saying it smelled so nice. Dr. Jackson's does smell good!]

When a saddle is wet after rinsing it, that's when to bend any curled-up leather back to its original shape. When I say wet, I don't mean just on the surface, but clear through, from the backside if necessary.

Uhhh..... what was the quetion? Oh,yeah, to condition a saddle, I use 100% pure neatsfoot oil on the backside of the leather and Lexol leather conditioner on the surface of the leather. Lexol buffs to a nice shine. A good trick to using neatsfoot oil is to warm some in the micro (not hot!), then apply it to the leather. It soaks in more thoroughly. A little goes a long way.

Is the bridle the same shade of color as the saddle? If not I can show you how to bleach it out with oxalic acid. Is there anything else you wanted to ask? Good luck! [Smiley Wavey]

#26 DeLucky2

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 02:25 PM

Thanks for the info Jack. The leather is just dried and cracked on my friends saddle. As for my headstall, it just so happened that the color of the headstall matches the saddle. Well, it looks like it with the dust on it anyway..... [Smile] I am hoping to get it cleaned up within the next couple of weeks or so if not sooner, but it sure looks like it will match. Thanks again!

[ 11-24-2007, 02:27 PM: Message edited by: DeLucky2 ]

#27 AKPonyGirl

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 03:51 PM

Thanks for the compliments on my new scabbard. Unfortunately I do not have a Model 94 Winchester (yet) but I do have a Marlin 4570 Guide Gun. Clay Sharp (my saddle guy) made a scabbard for that gun by wrapping it in plastic and molding the gun around it. Oh my goodness, what a cool scabbard!

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However, I still have not put the scabbard on my saddle. When I was a kid hauling around a .22 I remember that the rifle stock was pointing backwards and the gun was right side up so that when I pulled the gun from the scabbard it was ready to be shouldered. I cannot figure out how to put the two together. And is it a personal preference as to which way it goes? I got a bunch of people on the Trail Riding board telling me that I should point the scabbard the other way. I'm probably NOT going to be shooting that gun off any horse. But I think the gun should be accessible while I'm dismounting. Any suggestions?

Oh yeah.....I really like the way these posts to Jack go in different directions. Thanks for the stories.

#28 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 10:01 PM

Oooh, a 45-70. Kinda big caliber, no? Back in ancient history, late, late fifties, I went with some people to a rough,tough coal mining town in West Virginia. We stayed a couple of nights with some people who lived on a big hill. They didn't have a driveway, so we had to park below and walk up.

Old Clyde, our host, had an old 45-70 Springfield black powder gun. You laid this big bullet down in a space and laid the top piece over it then rolled a thing back over it to hold it down. We went out behind the house and Clyde set some beer bottles farther up the hill to shoot at. He stuck one in the crotch of a tree.

Then Clyde handed me the this gun that was nearly as long as I was tall and told me to take the one in the tree. I could have sat at a picnic table with a gunrest, but figured I'd better stand and lean into this big sucker or be knocked on my can.

When I fired, I was surprised that it didn't kick any more than a .410. I had to wait for the smoke to clear to see if I'd hit the bottle. I had. Clyde laughed like ****. He said everybody expected the gun to kick hard, but black powder isn't as potent as the newer ammo. I swear, that bullet looked as big as my finger!

I'd tell you of the nighttime fox hunt we went on, but I've already yammered enough.

Edited to say I have a Model 94 Winchester 30-30 that I inherited from my brother. He bought it new back in the 50's. I've heard it's worth a pretty good price now.

[ 11-24-2007, 10:04 PM: Message edited by: Jack Baumgartner ]

#29 AKPonyGirl

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 02:38 AM

It is a big caliber gun but you have to remember that I live in Alaska. I want a bullet with stopping power no matter what I aim at!

In Alaska, there are all sorts of rules about harvesting game. The rules are pretty specific too. I was used to hunting squirrels in Kentucky and Tennessee where a headshot with a .22 was considered sporting. Now squirrels in the South are way bigger than the ones up here and with a head shot I knew that I wasn't gonna find any metal in the meat. That's why we used a .22 instead of any kind of shotgun.

It took so many Alaska squirrels to make a stew that I stopped making the stew but continued to cut off the tails and send them to Mepps for fly tying hairs. Imagine my surprise when I was told by Fish and Game that I was in violation of the game regulations because I was not using all of what was left of the squirrel. So I asked the Moose and Goose trooper if there was nothing left of the critter was I still in violation of the regs. He said no so I started hunting with my .44 Taurus. Not much left of the little guys after that.

#30 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 10:31 AM

Speaking of squirrels..... more about that a little later.

On Thanksgiving, Angela, my "adapted" daughter, called from Pennsylvania. She's a registered nurse and works at various hospitals in her area. Otherwise, the whole family is outdoorsy.

They hunt, trap and fish and also do varmint removal from people's garages and barns. They even bought a hunting camp over in the mountains. Last year, as they were leaving camp to come home, her almost-seven-year-old daughter Emma complained of a bellyache. It seemed to get worse as they drove along, so Angela drove straight to the hospital. It was appendicitis.

A young surgeon was called in. As he looked at Emma's chart, he noticed that she had a birthday coming up. To break the ice, he asked what she wanted for her birthday. Emma said, "A .22. A pink one!" He quickly wrote down a name and phone number and handed it to Angela, saying, "This guy will give you a good deal on a .22. Tell him I sent you."

So, Emma got her .22 for her birthday, although not a pink one. She's gotten pretty handy with it, and is learning about gun safety. For her eighth birthday, she got a .410 shotgun. I like the idea of teaching children early-on about guns and safety with firearms.

Heaven help her if she even mentions guns in school! The PC police will nail her!

Back to squirrels - Angela said that when she pulled in her driveway one day earlier this past week, a fat squirrel in a tree began scolding her. She went in and grabbed a .22 and came back out and dropped it. She let her husband clean and skin it. She doesn't mind skinning a deer, but has her hubby do the small game. Kinda squirrelly, ain't it? [ROTFL]

[ 11-25-2007, 10:33 AM: Message edited by: Jack Baumgartner ]