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Pete Ramey Thrush Goo


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#1 heidi

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 09:14 PM

How long does it take to clear up a deep central sulcus thrush? Ive been treating it daily and have only noticed he isnt sore on his heels anymore.

Im using a 35cc syringe (without the needle) to insert the goo into the crevis. The crevis is as deep as the syringe tip. I fill it up till it comes oozing out.

Should I be treating more than once a day?

Im guessing that once the thrush is gone, it will start to fill in from the bottom up?

#2 Wild Rose

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 06:33 AM

How long have you been treating it?

Rosie had a yeast infection in her frogs. It wasn't thrush. At least it wasn't black and smelly. It was a light grayish color. I did the same as you are doing with the syringe. I also cleaned it well first with a mixture of Lysol floor cleaner and water. I treated Rosie's about twice a week only. It took a couple months to clear up, but I wasn't treating it as often as you are. I imagine if I'd been treating it more often, it would have cleared up faster, but my trimmer said to do it once or twice a week.

I think if you are treating it once a day, it shouldn't take too long. Unless Pete's goo is for yeast infections, not thrush. I'm not sure.

I used half and half, athletes foot cream containing clotrimizole and triple antibiotic. I think that's Pete's goo.

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#3 jumpin_horses

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 09:43 AM

QUOTE (Wild Rose @ Aug 5 2008, 12:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I used half and half, athletes foot cream containing clotrimizole and triple antibiotic. I think that's Pete's goo.


yep, this is right... but, also to make Ramey/Jumpin Goo, add monostat, to go after a possible yeast infection (yes, monostat) use the cream and poke a hole in those little capsules too. And add Desitin diaper rash 1/2 tube to dry out the feet. I think with the above ingrediants and these you can really go after more bugs.

you should start to see new growth in in about 3 to 4 weeks, but, keep up the goo, it could take months to recover.

but, in all honestly, the goo is only a small part of permanently healing thrush. the BEST way to go after it is to put those frogs to work and out-run it. by that I mean get him MOVING - IMPORTANT: heel-to-toe.... now, he is NOT going to land on his heel because of the pain of the infection... so, how do you get him moving properly? goo treatments, and boots and pads. make sure the boots are fitted properly. (I recommend Epics) leave them on him 22/7. sprinkel medicated gold bond powder in them while he is wearing them. remove them for 2 hours a day to disinfect with lysol and dry out.

also, can you tell us what his diet, lifestyle consists of?

Edited by jumpin_horses, 05 August 2008 - 09:48 AM.


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#4 heidi

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 10:33 AM

I have been treating him for a week with the goo, and treated him a few days before the goo with Rickens until I could get to Walmart as our local Dollar General did not carry the clotrimazole.

The thrush is in his back feet. One is worse than the other. He is moving pretty much heel to toe on the back feet now. Before he was not.

He is being moved, he is being ridden and he is in a 30x70 dry lot. He is not tender anymore on his heel bulbs. He gets 6# of a pelleted feed plus bermuda, alfalfa or prairie hay daily. He is also getting a joint supplement, Remission, ulcer powder, and Ani Motion plus a loose mineral.

I have a pair of easy boots, but they are too big for him(at least they are on the front feet). I am unemployed right now and due to the economy have had great difficulty finding a job that actually pays enough to pay for daycare and my time. I have also just enrolled in Graduate school. Finances are tight and I just spent a ton on getting teeth floated and had an unexpected emergency when a mare came up with a large fence staple in her frog.

Please dont bash me for not having money etc... I dont need that right now.

I am setting some money aside to be able to add the monistat to the mix.

Since we are having a heat wave with 100+ temps.. do I still need to add the Desitin?

#5 jumpin_horses

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 11:03 AM

you're not gonna get bashed on the hoof forum.

you may want to test the sugar content of his diet and lower that.

yes, do the desitin you want to dry everything out deep into the cracks and crevisis (sp?).

if you cant boot, just keep up the goo for a while.. you will beat it, but, it takes TONS of persistance, and patience. what you are trying to do is arrest the infection until the frog can grow out...

- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
- The more gagets you need to train a horse, the less skills you have.
- Nothing obtained by force can be beautiful.
- Every horse deserves a good foot... Its their right.
- The world would be a better place if human children were raised by brood mares



RIP - Webby -- "You were SO beautiful. I will never forget you. I will LOVE you forever"

#6 heidi

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 12:23 PM

I figured his total ration NSC, and its 19%. They told me that the sugar was 1.4 (dont know what measurement that is in) I was told anything under a total NSC of 20% was okay and if he gets sore footed to lower that closer to 11%. He is doing fine and not sore footed and is not overweight or have fat pockets.

Glad to know I wont get bashed here. jump.gif

I will stop by the dollar store and get some desitin to add to what I have mixed up now. I will have to wait till the bills are paid to get the monostat.

#7 jumpin_horses

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 12:34 PM

I would say keep his NSC at 13% or less if possible, and see if he improves quicker.

Edited by jumpin_horses, 05 August 2008 - 12:35 PM.


- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
- The more gagets you need to train a horse, the less skills you have.
- Nothing obtained by force can be beautiful.
- Every horse deserves a good foot... Its their right.
- The world would be a better place if human children were raised by brood mares



RIP - Webby -- "You were SO beautiful. I will never forget you. I will LOVE you forever"

#8 heidi

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 01:33 PM

QUOTE (jumpin_horses @ Aug 5 2008, 11:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would say keep his NSC at 13% or less if possible, and see if he improves quicker.


Do you have any suggestions on how to lower it without buying a different feed? The low starch feed around here runs about $15 a bag. I cant do that right now.

I have bermuda hay, prairie hay and alfalfa. Could I just lower my grain amount and add more hay to meet his needs?

Any other suggestions? Could I substitute alfalfa pellets for his grain?

#9 jumpin_horses

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 01:44 PM

It would be best to see if your veterinarian has any suggestions. they know the area, your horse's environment, lifestyle better and have a better idea of whats available to you. just tell them you are getting tired of feeding her thrush, and wanna bring her sugars down.

once you get this under control, you might want to consider spraying the bottoms of her feet a couple times a week with apple cider vinegar. this will help regulate the PH balance of her feet so this organizim doesnt take over again.





- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
- The more gagets you need to train a horse, the less skills you have.
- Nothing obtained by force can be beautiful.
- Every horse deserves a good foot... Its their right.
- The world would be a better place if human children were raised by brood mares



RIP - Webby -- "You were SO beautiful. I will never forget you. I will LOVE you forever"

#10 heidi

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 01:48 PM

The vets in the area are not very helpful with nutrition.

I just figured if I lower his grain to 2# per day and increased his hay to 25# per day, that would be 13% NSC.

I just dont know if he will eat that much hay in a day.

#11 jumpin_horses

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 01:55 PM

if you reduce the grain, you may want to add a vitamin/mineral/oil supp...

I like ACCEL you can get it at valleyvet.com

its hard for me to recommend anything as I have not seen the horse, and what his lifestyle is. I take nutrition very seriously and wouldnt want to recommend something that works in 'MY' area, with 'MY' horse, with 'HER' lifestyle and have it fail in 'YOUR' area... ya know what I mean?

is there a veterinary school in your area that you can consult?

or go to purinamills website, I think they have some equine nutritionists that can help you.

you might want to look into soaked sugar beet pulp too

NOTE: please soak it A LOT. fibers are digested in the hind gut, when you soak it, you take all that moisture into the hind gut of the horse which improves digestion.

ETA - make sure the beet pulp is the "molassas free" kind

Edited by jumpin_horses, 05 August 2008 - 02:02 PM.


- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
- The more gagets you need to train a horse, the less skills you have.
- Nothing obtained by force can be beautiful.
- Every horse deserves a good foot... Its their right.
- The world would be a better place if human children were raised by brood mares



RIP - Webby -- "You were SO beautiful. I will never forget you. I will LOVE you forever"

#12 heidi

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 03:43 PM

I cant get the molassas free beet pulp here. No one will special order it, Ive already checked. I can only get the shreds and I do soak it for the one that is getting it now.

I feed Purina Natures Essentials Free Balance Balance 12:12 which is a mineral/vitamin supplement already.

This horse is a barrel horse, so keeping his weight up is important. He isnt a hard keeper, but not super easy either.

There is a vet school in Stillwater at OSU. Not sure if they have any nutritionists available or not.

I might call one of the feed dealers and see what they have to say. The feed manufacturer of my feed doesnt have a lot of info on this and feeding horses since they primarily manufacture cow feed and alfalfa products. (they only have three horse feeds)

The only thing with adding oil, is it can be inflamatory due to the omegas. I feed him about 1/4 cup of flax seed daily and could increase to 1 cup, but I dont think that will give him enough extra calories. I wont feed BOSS.

Ive not had any luck in the past with any low carb feeds, they all lost weight despite feedin them more than was recommended. Called the manufacters nutritionist and they told me it didnt have enough energy in it for my horse and to buy a $40 product from them to add more fat to the ration. That made some very expensive feed, and that was a couple years ago when feed prices were down.

#13 jumpin_horses

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 04:24 PM

QUOTE (heidi @ Aug 5 2008, 09:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I feed Purina Natures Essentials Free Balance Balance 12:12 which is a mineral/vitamin supplement already.


yea, thats a good vita supp. so you are fine there


QUOTE (heidi @ Aug 5 2008, 09:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There is a vet school in Stillwater at OSU. Not sure if they have any nutritionists available or not.


give it a shot, let us know what they say

QUOTE (heidi @ Aug 5 2008, 09:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The only thing with adding oil, is it can be inflamatory due to the omegas.


HUH? questionicon.gif



okay, here is what I feed my TB mare, this works for her. we dressage and hunt/jump and we live in Michigan, so she is a performance horse. some even say she is a little.... um... on the big side.... but, shes shiney, and healthy and happy. this summer she has gotten ridden 5 to 6 times a week...

the most important feed: - grassy 80%/weedy 20%, mowed pasture in summer (10 acres shared with 2 donkeys) and she is OUT 24/7. Hay (orchard/timothy 95% small amount of alfalfa 5%) in the winter

this is PER feeding

Morning - summer (winter feeding I add the ACCEL and take away the electrolyte and almost double the Strategy)

about 2# of Strategy
1 oz. Farriers formula (reducing slowly, soon to discontinue, as her feet look great now)
1 tsp. Turmeric (per a equine nutritionist/herbalist)
1/4 cup of ground flax
1 tbsp of celtic sea salt
1 tsp Red Cal during heat stress (salt/mineral electrolyte)
2 oz Bragg Apple cider vinegar
2 oz Olive oil (yep, not the cheap stuff)
great big bowl of thoroughly soaked/runny beet pulp (pelleted M-Free)

Evening -

everything the same, except I give her a probio instead of the apple cider vinegar at night. I dont mix the ACV and probios together. the ACV is harsh on the little buggers..

salt and mineral blocks, fresh clean water.

IMO - horses need the most of the feed that comes natural to them first (pasture/grass hay) and PLENTY of it, fresh clean water, salt mineral source. and MOVEMENT. once that requirement is meet, everything from there is a "supplement" in my book. less is more, figure out exactly what your horse needs, even the season he is in.... do some research.

even hay. some hay can look good, but, actually be quite high in sugar. test your hay. for example, last year I got 1st cutting hay because by the time 2nd cutting came around we were in a droubt. 2nd cutting looked okay, but, was actually quite high in sugar/starch, and my vet treated a TON laminitis last winter due to people feeding 2nd cutting like they normally do. but, I got first cutting (timothy) because it was good clean hay and tested low on sugar, it wasnt as high in proteins/vitas/mins, so I upped the ACCEL, and everybody did just fine on it.. this year, 2nd cutting is actually coming up very well, so I just filled my barn with 2nd cut for this winter......

Edited by jumpin_horses, 05 August 2008 - 04:27 PM.


- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
- The more gagets you need to train a horse, the less skills you have.
- Nothing obtained by force can be beautiful.
- Every horse deserves a good foot... Its their right.
- The world would be a better place if human children were raised by brood mares



RIP - Webby -- "You were SO beautiful. I will never forget you. I will LOVE you forever"

#14 heidi

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 05:28 PM

Here is the info on Omegas:

Omega 3:6 Essential Fatty Acids
Various oils all contain roughly the same energy. But each oil or fat has a blend of different fatty acids in its content. These are the Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids. Both are unsaturated fatty acids. A correct ratio of these fatty acids is essential, (ideally the natural balance in feeds should be up to 5:1 (Linoleic (Omega 6) : Linolenic (Omega 3)), as these are transformed in the body into highly potent regulators of a wide range of essential body processes, including inflammation and immune response.

For example, Omega 6 fatty acids (Linoleic acid) create the inflammatory agents stimulating an inflammatory or allergic response. These agents constrict blood flow, and are between 100 and 100 times more potent at causing inflammatory responses than are Omega 3 fatty acids. In contrast, the Omega 3 fatty acids (Linolenic acid) reduce or regulate inflammatory responses. High grain diets are very high in Omega 6 fatty acids and low in omega 3ís.

A correct ratio of Omega 3 to Omega 6 fatty acids is critical to maintaining a healthy animal. Inflammatory responses such as laminitis, arthritis and skin problems can readily occur when the Omega 3:6 ratio is imbalanced

Many of the commonly available oils such as corn, cottonseed, sunflower and safflower oils have very high levels of Omega 6 (inflammatory) oils, and very little Omega 3 oils. These are often used for coat conditioning.

What is the Tumeric for? I like your feeding program.

I havent heard of any founder etc on hay down here due to the cutting. Very interesting.

Do you know what the NSC is for the Strategy?

My bermuda is 2nd cut and was cut before it got hot. Prairie hay is 1st cut.

I still have some of last years hay which was overly mature when cut due to the high rain amounts we got last year. My alfalfa I have on hand is last years 1st cut from South Dakota. My grass hay is from here in Oklahoma.

I will be getting a second cut alfalfa from South Dakota this year as his first cut was not horse quality.







#15 jumpin_horses

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 06:53 AM

wow, thats cool about the omegas... I wonder what olive oil is at.. ratio of O6:O3.. I will have to check it out


turmeric is actually a spice used in mustard.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

I buy it in bulk here

http://www.frontiercoop.com/

the best way to know for sure about your hay is to have it tested.... some universities (with a AG dept) will test samples for free. you just reach into the middle of the bale and pull out a sample and take it to them, or mail it.



- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
- The more gagets you need to train a horse, the less skills you have.
- Nothing obtained by force can be beautiful.
- Every horse deserves a good foot... Its their right.
- The world would be a better place if human children were raised by brood mares



RIP - Webby -- "You were SO beautiful. I will never forget you. I will LOVE you forever"

#16 heidi

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 11:20 AM

Here is a chart that is helpful on the Omegas. The cart isnt going to show up right. Under each item, the first number is the Omega -3, the second is the Omega-6. You can see why people feed Flax and BOSS together as they compliment each other with their Omegas.



Dietary sources of EFAs

Food

Omega-3 (grams per100g)

Omega-6 (grams per 100g)

Flax

20.3

4.9

Hemp seeds

7.0

21.0

Pumpkin seeds

3.2

23.4

Salmon

3.2

0.7

Walnuts

3.0

30.6

Rape seed

2.1

9.0

Herring

2.0

0.4

Soybeans

1.2

8.6

Butter

1.2

1.8

Olive oil

0.6

7.9

Wheat germ

0.5

5.5

Sunflower seeds

0

30.7

Almond

0

9.2

Olives

0

1.6

Edited by heidi, 06 August 2008 - 11:24 AM.


#17 jumpin_horses

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 11:31 AM

so, it looks like (if Im reading this correctly) soybean are the closest to being the correct 5:1 ratio? is that correct

arent most vege oils "soybean" Kroger brand is....

but, youd want to cut the flax seed then, because the flax will throw off the omegas

the olive oil looks like its about 13:1. but, even though the olive oil balance is off, the flax seed I feed (which looks like it is: 1:4) would make up the difference?

am I reading it correctly?

the thing I dont like about store bought vege oils in the hydrogenation process

Edited by jumpin_horses, 06 August 2008 - 11:55 AM.


- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
- The more gagets you need to train a horse, the less skills you have.
- Nothing obtained by force can be beautiful.
- Every horse deserves a good foot... Its their right.
- The world would be a better place if human children were raised by brood mares



RIP - Webby -- "You were SO beautiful. I will never forget you. I will LOVE you forever"

#18 Diamond Jake

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 12:00 PM

Not to rob the post, but you actually want your Omega 3's higher than your Omega 6's.
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#19 jumpin_horses

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 12:07 PM

QUOTE (serendell @ Aug 6 2008, 05:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not to rob the post, but you actually want your Omega 3's higher than your Omega 6's.


THANKS! now Im really confused rotf.gif bang_head.gif

okay got this from an olive oil website...

****** Olive Oil contains the two essential fatty acids. There is currently debate about how much omega-3 versus omega-6 one should have in their diet. The two fatty acids compete for space in the cell membranes. Studies show that there are benefits and risks to too much of either. While more of the omega-3 alpha Linolenic acid can help prevent heart disease, studies have suggested it may increase prostate cancer and macular degeneration7. According to the Merck Manual, an authoritative medical text, essential fatty acids should make up 1-2% of the dietary calories for adults with a suggested ratio of 10:1 for omega-6:omega-3 fatty acids.

Olive oil is about 10% linoleic acid (an omega-6 oil) and about 1% linolenic acid (an omega-3 oil), therefore the ratio is 10:1

If you were using only olive oil for your dietary fat and fats represented 30% of the calories in your diet, then you would be getting 3% of your calories in the form of essential fatty acids in a 10:1 ratio. Other more recent studies suggest closer to a 5:1 ratio may be more beneficial.********

Edited by jumpin_horses, 06 August 2008 - 12:12 PM.


- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
- The more gagets you need to train a horse, the less skills you have.
- Nothing obtained by force can be beautiful.
- Every horse deserves a good foot... Its their right.
- The world would be a better place if human children were raised by brood mares



RIP - Webby -- "You were SO beautiful. I will never forget you. I will LOVE you forever"

#20 heidi

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 10:15 PM

Yes, you do want your Omega 3s higher than your Omega 6s. There is varying recommendations on the ratio. They dont really know for sure what the right ratio is.

When you figure the ratio, you also need to figure in your grain you are feeding. Any grain/pellet that is made with any type of grain or grain by product will have more Omega 6s. That can be balanced by feeding something high in Omega 3's, like Flax. Knowing what your grain ration's Omega 6 and 3 level is the problem (unless you are feeding a whole grain and not a textured mix or pellet), but you can assume that is is most likely high in Omega 6's

Here is another article, has some good easy reading and more info than what was posted before. I like the fact that Omega 3's are not inflamatory and also help to regulate insulin. This could really help horses that have metabolic issues.

http://www.wellbalan...orse.com/?cat=5

#21 Mudder

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 12:50 PM

bump
Sappy's son Hunter is my wooden spoon minion. Hunter ROCKS!!
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#22 NCTrailgirl

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 01:10 PM

Thanks Mudder!

So 1/4 of each item in a mix?

athletes foot cream containing clotrimizole cream
triple antibiotic ointment
monostat cream
Desitin diaper rash ointment


Sound right?
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#23 Mudder

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 01:50 PM

I'm not sure but that sounds good to me. You can always add a bit more monostat or athletes foot cream if you want or need to. happy0203.gif And it's safe to spray every day no matter what the ACV.
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#24 NCTrailgirl

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 02:23 PM

Thanks so much!!
Proudly Owned By:
1995 TWH 'Charm', Chestnut - Gelding
1998 SSH 'Hotball', Black & White - Gelding
2000 SSH 'Kierra', Black & White - Mare
2004 SSH 'Saphira', Black & White - Mare
1986 AQHA 'Monty', Sorrel - Gelding - RIP my dear friend 5/17/08

NC ~ TN Trail Riding Buddies

Back Country Horsemen of NC

I've met Board Buddies!! Dam Yankee, Dixie Belle, Hobbles and Mrs. Hobbles, Trinity, Yee Haw, Loverofhorses36, TequilaSkye, Blue Skye Traveler, edenn3583, brlracr624, smooth4me, KatyB

"All horses can go barefoot, but not all owners can." ~ Cindy Sullivan

#25 heidi

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 10:31 PM

I wanted to update on my horse. I can no longer stick my hoof pick down in the central sulcus!!!

He had lots of frog growth over the last 6 weeks, it was unreal!! His frog is actually touching the ground finally, something that hasnt happened in a very long time!!

jump.gif

#26 Mudder

Mudder

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 11:27 PM

yahoo.gif yahoo.gif I think my boy had a touch of it as well. It wasn't smelly or anything but he seemed touchy around the sulcus. It seemed like there was a tiny bit of a hollow spot or something there. I've been treating him regardless what it was for just over a week now. Doing the borax soak every second day, treating his hoof every day, and spraying the vinegar on all 4 hooves. I don't see or feel anything now, and he's not touchy at all. I must admit, he's getting much better with his hoof spa days. He's not splashing me near as much, and is quite content to let things soak winking0073.gif
Sappy's son Hunter is my wooden spoon minion. Hunter ROCKS!!
Due to current financial restraints, the light at the end of the tunnel will be turned off until further notice... stole this from Saudimack
Murderous Mudzie Murtano

#27 This Is It

This Is It

    stupid should hurt

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 07:43 AM

Hey, just wanted to jump in here. If you have a horse that won't soak their feet (like I do...) you can do a Borax scrub. Make the borax into a paste and use an old toothbrush to gently scrub the funk out of their feet. :)

Sarah

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Tell me it can't be done, and I will do it.
Tell me the goal is too high, and I will reach it.
Place an obstacle in front of me, and I will leap over it.
Challenge me, dare me or even defy me.
But do not underestimate me.
For on the back of my American Quarter Horse, anything is possible.

 


#28 Mudder

Mudder

    Keeper of the Wooden Spoons

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 08:48 AM

LOL. This is it, he just likes to splash, like he's standing in the river or something. But that would work. Thanks for the tip. happy0203.gif
Sappy's son Hunter is my wooden spoon minion. Hunter ROCKS!!
Due to current financial restraints, the light at the end of the tunnel will be turned off until further notice... stole this from Saudimack
Murderous Mudzie Murtano

#29 The Sugar Lady

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 02:20 PM

QUOTE (This Is It @ Sep 17 2008, 07:43 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hey, just wanted to jump in here. If you have a horse that won't soak their feet (like I do...) you can do a Borax scrub. Make the borax into a paste and use an old toothbrush to gently scrub the funk out of their feet. :)



Ooooooooooooooh, I like that! Is that really as effective? I only have one soaking boot, and it seems like two of my horses have varying degrees of thrush in each foot. The soaking boot that I have fits one horse, but definitely not the other, and he won't sit still long enough to soak his foot in a bucket. I keep meaning to get some ACV, but the closest place is about 10 miles from me, and with gas being like it is, I'm waiting until I have enough things to do in that neck of the woods. (Evil gas people!)

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#30 journeysgirl

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 06:22 PM

I took the borax and made a thick paste out of it. Packed it in the grooves of the (clean) hoof. Then put my hoof boots on the horse. Turned her out, then the next evening took them off and scrubbed the foot and the boots. Sprayed with ACV and turned her out. Do that a couple times a week and makes a big difference.

For soaking a... jittery... horse. I put their foot in a flat feed tub, pick up the opposite foot, then have somebody dump your solution in the tub. The boring part is sitting there holding up the other foot.

1c958838-4475-4695-b61d-b8ec73e28191_zps

 

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