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Homemade Manure Spreader?


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#1 saltwater redneck

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 07:36 AM

I wasn't sure what forum to put this in but I know there are some real thinkers on the hoof forum. Have any of you ever made your own manure spreader? Do you have any pics or diagrams? I just can't do the 1000 bucks for one.
Thanks
Lee
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#2 jcus

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 08:18 AM

Sometimes you can find people who redo the old ground driven spreaders that you see around no longer in use. That might be an option if you are a handy person. Currently I just load the bucket of my tractor with stall cleanings. Depending on the day I can get 4 stalls worth in one bucket - that's cleaning everyday & bedding with shavings. Horses are only in at night. If you bed with straw you want a bigger spreader than the 25 bucket ones you see advertised for about $1000 - they just don't have enough power to handle the straw well. Good luck with whatever you do.

#3 missyclare

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 11:15 PM

I saw one once! It was chain link fencing with an old mattress on top...worked like a charm! (That is, if the manure is already on the field.) flirt.gif
As for my pile, I spread the joy all around...feed the trees, the flower gardens, mulch the veg. garden. I put a small diameter circle around the bases of all the tree trunks where the lawn is mowed. Keeps those crazies from getting too close and nicking the trees.
Right now I'm making a "Yellow Brick Road" for Hero to walk on. He actually speeds up on it because its more comfortable. It's taken two weeks of his own poo to completely circle the barn and pave the way to his freedom, lol!
Wish I had a tractor. The 4 wheeler died last year and I'm down to the lawnmower. I remember a little unit that John Lyons was promoting... one that hooked up to the back of a lawnmower...can't remember the name of it....something Creek? You could drive the whole unit down the aisle past the stalls.
Check those auctions sales out.


#4 chele

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 01:53 PM

I saw on another site that they use a 10' x 5' piece of chain link with a 4" round pipe across one end. They dump their stall cleanings on it then drag it around the pasture.

eta:

I wonder if I could use this as the base for composting my cleanings, maybe even be able to use the chain link to roll/turn the compost? Compost, then spread. Probably shorten the lifespan of the chainlink, but could be handy?!

Edited by chele, 28 March 2009 - 01:56 PM.


#5 saltwater redneck

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 07:07 PM

I like the ideas. Simple is very good for me. I also wondered how a lawn sweeper would do, I could remove the catch bag and add the grate/fence.
Lee
"The sole of a horse is a beautiful thing"

#6 jklucky2001

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 11:04 AM

Good topic SaltWater Redneck!

I just got done using my homemade manure spreader yesterday. I have a big pallet about 4' x 4'. I put thin plywood on top, I put two 2x4's under it on the front of the three runners to lift the front. I pile manure on top and drag it around my pasture with my quad. Having the nearly 4" lift on the front makes and manure come off after about one trip around hauling butt. I tried it flat first. That took a lot of trips around and seemed to be wasting gas IMO. That thing is heavey and makes the back end of the quad slide around a little on fast turns, so be careful not to go too fast or it might roll. Also our quad is a Polaris Sportsman 700 4x4. A 2 wheel drive or smaller quad would not be able to handle a full pallet of weight. Mine is big and barely made it when taking off with the pile of poo on the pallet. I took off slow in the barn yard and waited until I got out to the grass part of the pasture before speeding up so the bumping around would bounce the poo off. I sure found a bunch of huge earth worms in the manure pile! Too bad someone who fishes wasn't around to pick them out. Now their spread all over my pasture! Then I closed the spread area off from the horses for a while to let the grass grow! Soon as it seeds out and gets a little less green I'll start letting my horses out on it a little at a time!

I really like the chain link fence ideas. That would be wonderfull. I'm gonna have to work on finding someone who has some old chain link they can spare!
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#7 saltwater redneck

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 08:02 PM

I found a used lawn sweeper and bought it for 25 bucks. I am quite pleased with how it picks up the poo. You may have to run over it twice but it gets most of it. I am going to take off the catch bag and replace it with a piece of fence. That way it will kick up the poo, landing on the fence and then sifting through and getting scattered.
You may be wondering why the fuss over mucking a pasture. Right now I have 3 horses on about 3 acres of land. It is just temporary till I get my dream property. I do not stall my horses so the pastures get alot of abuse with 27/7 turnout.
Lee
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#8 jklucky2001

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 12:06 AM

Here's some pics of my home made manure spreader. I used a pallet about 4'x4' and covered it with thin plywood. Then I nailed two 2x4s on top of each other on the front so the front is lifted higher than the back. I pile on the poo, then tow it around the pasture with the quad going fast! Be careful not to get too much poo on there for your quad to tow and make sure it is a good strong quad so it doesn't get damaged in the process. Mine is a polaris sportsman 700 4x4 quad.

So here's the manure spreader.


I carried a hammer and some extra nails with me so I could fix the pallet after each trip. Bouncing over all the river rock we have seemed to jar the nails loose after a couple trips.

Here's how my pasture looks after spreading the poo. You can see the trails where I spread. But it is not too think to where it would slow down the grass growth. I did about 15-20 pallet loads all by my self... I was pretty sore the next day from all the shoveling!


I still like the chain link fencing one. I'm working on finding some of it to make one for me.
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#9 saltwater redneck

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 07:26 AM

After going over more info I have decided not to spread the manure back into the pasture. I have a small pasture and I am worried about creating a worm problem. The lawn sweeper works good to pick it up and it gets pine needles, leaves, pine cones etc. I have a place in back that I will make a compost pile. Thanks for the feedback.
Lee
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#10 jklucky2001

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 09:03 AM

My parasite control plan is to keep this grass area with manure on it closed off from the horses with a hot wire for about 2.5 months. That will also allow the grass to reach maturity and seed out. Plus I don't like my horses to eat fresh growing green grass.

Please share any good info you have about parasite issues with manure spread on the pasture. I know worms live in the manure, but I've always wondered how to control them and or kill them. I have never been able to find anything about best practices for controlling them besides composting and keeping the manure and horses mouths seperate.

Did you find anything online, if so could you share the links?
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#11 saltwater redneck

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Posted 11 April 2009 - 08:21 AM

Most info that I have read recommends that you compost the manure before spreading it back on the pasture. The eggs can lay dormant in the manure for a long time and the heat and chemical reactions in composting kills them, or thats what I have read.

http://www.aaep.org/...20Parasites.doc



Lifecycle of worms in your horse

The equine intestinal parasite or horse worms life cycle. Always use a good worming programme that includes a range of wormers and always consult your vet if you suspect worms are a problem.
The round worms life cycle :
Roundworms - generally affect young horses much more than older horses and there are several reasons for this higher rate of infection in young horses and more specificially 2 year olds.

Firstly foals and yearlings don't seem to be as particular about where or what they eat and they have a tendency to eat in areas where the number of round worm eggs may be greater.

It also appears that as a horse gets older it developes some immunity to the eggs or larva as they migrate through the tissues and that keeps them from becoming adult worms in the intestines.

Roundworm eggs can remain dormant for many years in the soil and can withstand great variations in temperature, which can be well below freezing for long periods of time, or very hot and still not kill the larvae inside the eggs.

The adults look very much like some of their close relatives, earth worms, they can grow to 5 inches or nearly 20 inches in length and are generally white to light grayish blue in color. They are usually described as looking like spaghetti and can cause the young horse to appear mal-nourished (rough hair coat and pot bellied). The larva are often responsible for fairly severe respiratory problems in weanlings and yearlings as they migrate through the lungs. Large numbers of these worms can also cause impaction colic in young horses.

The blood worms life cycle :
Bloodworms - Strongyles are responsible for the most damage done to horses by parasites. There are over 34 species of strongyles divided basically into 2 groups. The large and the small.

The large strongyle group has been the most damaging but the education of horse owners about the effects of internal parasites over the last 50 years, plus the development of new and more effective wormers has greatly reduced the harmful effects that strongyles have within the equine industry.

However, the prolific nature of the strongyle worms has allowed them to withstand the effects of these new worming medications.

Some horses pass as many as 5000 strongyle eggs per gram of stool and a drop of dew taken from a blade of grass in an equine pasture may contain as many as 100 dormant larvae
Studies have also indicated that 80%-90% of colics in horses are caused by strongyles. Both large and small strongyles have been proven to cause colic. The larval stages of large strongyles migrate through many tissues in the body of the horse, such as the liver, arteries, and intestinal lining. Small strongyle larvae excyst in the lining of the intestine and cause colic when they exist in large numbers.

The Bot fly and its worms life cycle :
Bot flys infect horses in large parts of the country.

Bots have a varied and interesting life cycle and the adults resemble a honey bee.

The larvae in the horses stomach look similar to many free living grubs.

The larvae attach themselves to the lining of the stomach and can cause a very small ulcer.

When there is a heavy infection and a great many larvae present then the individual ulcers can join and form one large ulcer.

If the resulting ulcer is large enough it can cause colic.

The tape worms life cycle :
Tapeworms are generally not thought to be much of a problem to horses.

However, in the last few years there seems to have been an increase in the number of horses being infected with tapeworms and. normal deworming medications are generally not very effective at eliminating these worms.

Therefore, in areas where tapeworms are known to be exist, special deworming programmes and specific wormers must be used to specifically control tapeworm.

Fortunately at present tapeworms do not cause horses a great amount of difficulty.

However, in certain situations the worm can cause colic and determined efforts should be made to control them.

The pin worms life cycle :
Pin worms - when you hear someone say "My horse must have worms, it's rubbing itís tail" then pin worms are usually the main culprit .

The glue that the adult female pinworm uses to attach her eggs to the horses external rectal tissue causes severe irritation to the horse.

This irritation is a major cause of tail rubbing.

However, due to major improvements in recent worming medications and the modern overall cleanliness of todays stables and yards pinworm problems have been greatly reduced.

"The sole of a horse is a beautiful thing"