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Bone Infection In Hoof


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#1 baylee

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 05:05 PM

Some of you may remember the gelding that was given to me that has foot problems that i have been battling for a few years now, if not here is a refresher... http://forums.horsec...w...7011065&hl=

he is doing MUCHHHH better by the way...his right front is completely healed with no holes at all and the left only has one hole, but it will not heal, hasnt been lame this whole summer, until the past month he started abcessing again in the left, the drainage came out of the existing hole and every time it would heal enough to stop the drainage he would get lame and then it would drain again. so off to the vet we went and did some xrays...he has a little bone infection in there. vet said not bad but he wants to use polyflex or something like that, i think thats what the antibiotic is called. he said there is only a few antibiotics that will help. but the infection is hard to see in these pictures but if you are looking at the picture, its the right side of the coffin bone in the frontal view. but his abcess hole that wont heal is on the other side of the hoof....is it still possible that the bone infection is responsible for that hole?

so what are your experiences with bone infections and is there anything i can be doing to make sure he heals completely?

here are the xrays and i will be getting recent pictures of his feet this evening.

the front view is the left hoof and the side view is the right hoof, i dont know why he did this


left

My Boys:
Cash Sierra Classic 'Lil Man' - '93 AQHA gelding
Smart Kit 'Hef' - '04 AQHA gelding

Weed Patrol (pygmy goats):
Buddy, Bucky, Buttercup, Bella, Baya, Curly, and Boomer

Keeper of the goats (dog patrol):
Muffin- 6 yr old mini donkey

Dogs:
Joker- 10 yr old boxer
Denali- 2 yr old boxer
Teal - 3 yr old lab
Chico- 3 yr old chihuahua
Smoki- hes a cat, but thinks hes a dog...

#2 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 11:55 PM

From looking at his Xrays alone, it looks like he's got a broken back axis there. You're old pics show underrun heels so, I'm wondering if he still suffers from this as his Xrays suggests it. I have found underrun heels to be difficult to correct when the whole hoof capsule is moved forward. Pretty much, I feel all you can do is keep the horse comfy while not lowering the heel so much as to completely remove it, but enough so you can get the toe back as far as possible without making him lame®. The longer that toe is allowed to grow, the more it's going to pull the heel with it.

As far as meds go, you said the vet gave you antibios, but what about something to increase circulation? I'd ask about something like Cipex or the Smartpak equivolent.
Is it possible to stay on topic to what the thread is about? Or has the population become so distracted it must resort to addressing every little allusion thus changing the direction of this thread and losing the topic? Have we lost the ability to recognize this problem and just start a new topic if the oppportunity arises? Please do so now if you feel so inclined to seek attention.


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#3 Wild Rose

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 06:57 AM

If the infection is truly in the bone, that's hard to heal. I hope he recovers.

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#4 Powder

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 12:48 PM

Bone infections are very serious and can be life threatening. If I were you, I would be soaking this horse's hoof as much as humanly possible. I mean, nearly every hour of the day if I could.

I've seen more bone infections than I would ever care to, and some require that you currette the bone and scrape away all the infectious material. I've seen a pretty serious infection be brought under control with just soaking, but the owner did it for days on end, literally. She was very dedicated to treating her horse and it paid off for them both.

I hope the antibiotics will help, but I think soaking certainly can't hurt and it should really help the situation.
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#5 aredhorse

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 01:07 PM

Antibiotics are important and you and your vet are on it - if this was my horse I would be wanting to do everything I could to boost his overall all immune system to battle the infection. I am not a herbalist but Lori Yearwood is someone I respect and trust. Here is her blog where you can get her email if you are interested in exploring this direction: http://naturalhorsejourney.typepad.com

#6 baylee

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 02:40 PM

thanks for the replies. I am not sure why the vet didnt get the heels in the xray...i guess so he could a closer view on the front of the foot????

this is scary, i didnt know it was so serious..the vet acted as if it wasnt anything serious, just give the antibiotics and he will recover. He said nothing about soaking or any other treatment...im so glad i posted this on here. he didnt even say anything about anything being broken either...

Felda, which foot does it look like the broken axis is on? and he does still have slightly underrun heels..but they are coming around. but he HAS to be trimmed every 5wks or he gets loooonnngg toes.

I want to take him to a different vet now but i dont know any good vets in texas....anyone know of any that are really good with hooves? I live near houston, but i dont care how far i have to drive.

One more thing...2 days ago (before vet visit) i ordered Clean Trax....would this be a good idea?? I asked the vet, but he has never heard of it.

thanks again for your replies and keep them coming!



eta: what about taking him to a&m? has anyone does this? is the a&m vet teaching hospital where i should take him?

Edited by baylee, 27 September 2009 - 03:45 PM.

My Boys:
Cash Sierra Classic 'Lil Man' - '93 AQHA gelding
Smart Kit 'Hef' - '04 AQHA gelding

Weed Patrol (pygmy goats):
Buddy, Bucky, Buttercup, Bella, Baya, Curly, and Boomer

Keeper of the goats (dog patrol):
Muffin- 6 yr old mini donkey

Dogs:
Joker- 10 yr old boxer
Denali- 2 yr old boxer
Teal - 3 yr old lab
Chico- 3 yr old chihuahua
Smoki- hes a cat, but thinks hes a dog...

#7 Margoddess

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 04:06 PM

The outcome of a horse with a serious infection in the foot is ify at best. My girlfriend had a gelding who was a super jumper-A circuit- competed at W Palm...Got a puncture wound in his hoof. The coffin bone got an infection, she sent him to the Univ. of Ga. they told her they could stop the infection but the horse would probably be lame for the rest of his life.

Unfortunately she had to make the decision to euthanise. If the infection had been caught a little earlier he possibly could have been saved. She did have him insured so she was able to get another horse.
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#8 Southerngurl01

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 06:32 PM

Look up supertonic. It's an herbal antibiotic. I've used it on horses a couple of times. It is excellent. I'd go over how to make it if I had more time to type it out. The problem is you'd need a lot for a horse with this kind of infection. But if you're looking at bad odds, I'd definitely use it.

Edited by Southerngurl01, 27 September 2009 - 06:36 PM.

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#9 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 08:29 PM

......? Okay.

Anyways, I believe that both feet are broken back. This link will explain more.

http://www.equipodia...om/hoofangl.htm

Most horses have be trimmed every 5 weeks or they will get overgrown very quickly after that. It seems to be a standard with horses in my region.

If this were my horse, I'd be getting a second opinion. Bone infections are nothing to play around with and from my experience in the medical field usually require more than a short course of antibios. Texas A&M sounds like a great opportunity if it's available to you. I wish I had something like that here.

I usually am along the same vein with Powder in threads, but I have to disagree with soaking this foot. The bone infection is inside the foot in the bone. Soaking will not reach that. It will soften the foot and may make this horse's situation worse.

BTW, most of ingredients in the supertonic promote circulation. That is a big factor in how well an organism can heal. I would not use the supertonic because I do not know what forms the allium herbs are in. Your products that are made of garlic that are marketed for horses usually go through some preperation before being marketted as safe for equine consumption. Garlic and onions in raw forms or certain prepared forms are actuall toxic to horses and will induce anemia in them. Anemia for this horse would be like cranking up the back hoe to dig his hole in the ground. On top of that, I wouldn't be considering a "supertonic" for a bone infection anyways.

Edited by ..::Felda::.., 27 September 2009 - 08:30 PM.

Is it possible to stay on topic to what the thread is about? Or has the population become so distracted it must resort to addressing every little allusion thus changing the direction of this thread and losing the topic? Have we lost the ability to recognize this problem and just start a new topic if the oppportunity arises? Please do so now if you feel so inclined to seek attention.


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#10 baylee

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 08:55 PM

i am definatly going to get a second opinion. i am calling tomorrow to make him an appointment with a&m. thank you all for the advice!
My Boys:
Cash Sierra Classic 'Lil Man' - '93 AQHA gelding
Smart Kit 'Hef' - '04 AQHA gelding

Weed Patrol (pygmy goats):
Buddy, Bucky, Buttercup, Bella, Baya, Curly, and Boomer

Keeper of the goats (dog patrol):
Muffin- 6 yr old mini donkey

Dogs:
Joker- 10 yr old boxer
Denali- 2 yr old boxer
Teal - 3 yr old lab
Chico- 3 yr old chihuahua
Smoki- hes a cat, but thinks hes a dog...

#11 Mudder

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 09:48 PM

A few years back when the vet had to lance my horses jaw to drain an abscess, he told me to be very diligent about keeping it clean and draining, so not to get infection in the bone. He said I would probably say good bye if it got in the bone. So this foot really scares me. Hope the second opinion is better news. huggy.gif
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#12 aredhorse

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 10:05 PM

Baylee, tomorrow you will be able to talk with your vet and get more information. Perhaps what you hear will lead you to getting a second opinion, perhaps not. It must be awful to hear that your horse may be in danger, and have to wait over the weekend. I'm just thinking that perhaps your vet, seeing the actual hoof which we can't, may have given you exactly the right info. Your hard work and diligent care have already brought Little Man so very far from when you first began to post about him. Hope tomorrow brings you good information and a clear direction.


Edited by aredhorse, 28 September 2009 - 12:30 AM.


#13 Powder

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 08:45 AM

From what I understand, this horse has an actively draining hole in the bottom of his foot. Soaking will help to keep the hole open and help draw out the infection. My vets have always recommended soaking an infected hoof, whether is it from an abscess or a more serious problem. That infection needs to get out of there, and soaking can and will help. Sorry to disagree with you, Felda, but I really don't see anyway that it would hurt and I've seen many examples that it did improve the situation, sometimes amazingly so.


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#14 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:57 AM

We'll have to agree to disagree then. It's just discussion anyways.
Is it possible to stay on topic to what the thread is about? Or has the population become so distracted it must resort to addressing every little allusion thus changing the direction of this thread and losing the topic? Have we lost the ability to recognize this problem and just start a new topic if the oppportunity arises? Please do so now if you feel so inclined to seek attention.


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#15 Powder

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 10:32 AM

Discussion is always a good thing, and I hope I didn't say anything to upset you, Felda. I certainly didn't intend to. I'm good with disagreement, and learn a lot from people who don't agree with me! Everyone has different experiences and opinions, and that's a good thing.

I do think this horse might benefit from seeing another vet, though.
"You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist." - Friedrich Nietzsche

#16 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 10:40 AM

Nothing to upset.


Is it possible to stay on topic to what the thread is about? Or has the population become so distracted it must resort to addressing every little allusion thus changing the direction of this thread and losing the topic? Have we lost the ability to recognize this problem and just start a new topic if the oppportunity arises? Please do so now if you feel so inclined to seek attention.


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#17 baylee

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 11:08 AM

ok i read that article in that link you sent me felda and im thinking thats his whole problem! All the problems hes been having is from having a broken back hoof pastern axis. I feel like an idiot..when you said broken back axis in your first post, i thought he had a broken bone somewheres duh.gif

anyways... heres my theories, anyone correct me if im wrong or if you have a better explaination...

the article states :

"A low hoof angle causes coffin joint extension (constant strain on that joint), increased strain on the deep digital flexor tendon...."

the tendon on the back of his leg is sometimes sore when i grab it and ask for him to pick up his foot...it also swells sometimes, its been awhile since ive seen this but it WAS an issue in the past. but still to this day, when he picks up his left for me..he picks it WAYYY up really fast like it hurts to pick it up when i clean it. it doesnt hurt him to hold it up..just when he picks it up. does that make sense?

"... and promotes toe-first landing which causes friction in the navicular bursa and delays the speed of breakover."

he is always jabbing his toe into the ground when he walks, it hasnt been so much this past summer, hes been doing good, but again...biggg issue in the past and he has been sore lately and do this again.

"There is experimental evidence that a low hoof angle will compromise circulation in the heel area of the foot."

if this was the case with him...since there is poor circulation in the heel, could this be why he abcesses so much in his heels? and he does have heel pain...he would rather put his weight on his toes when hes hurting. I had him xrayed for navicular (same vet) and he said no. But i am going for a second opinion...

"For veterinarians, this abnormal hoof conformation is known to contribute to navicular syndrome, chronic heel pain (bruising), coffin joint inflammation, quarter and heel cracks and interference problems"

aside from the quarter cracks, he has all these problems.


here are some pictures of his feet taken yesterday, i didnt get to take some of the soles, they were dirty and i didnt have my tools to clean them up at that moment...but these should give you an idea of how they are shaped. They are due for a trim...the last trim was almost 4 wks ago

left


right


so would you consider these hooves to have a severe broken back axis? what are important factors that should be taken into consideration when trimming, or let me reword that..what should be done when trimming that is different from a normal horse hoof trim? He does currently have a barefoot trimmer by the way, and he has had one for the last 2 yrs.

thanks for all the help so far! sorry this is so long
My Boys:
Cash Sierra Classic 'Lil Man' - '93 AQHA gelding
Smart Kit 'Hef' - '04 AQHA gelding

Weed Patrol (pygmy goats):
Buddy, Bucky, Buttercup, Bella, Baya, Curly, and Boomer

Keeper of the goats (dog patrol):
Muffin- 6 yr old mini donkey

Dogs:
Joker- 10 yr old boxer
Denali- 2 yr old boxer
Teal - 3 yr old lab
Chico- 3 yr old chihuahua
Smoki- hes a cat, but thinks hes a dog...

#18 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 01:16 PM

Yes, that is a def a broken back axis. What you couldn't see from the Xrays that is obvious here, is the amount of metabolic inconsistancy the foot too. That is also a huge contributing factor in his lameness, IMO. I would think a second opinion by Texas A&M is the best thing for this horse unless you can go to a different vet with better diagnostic/treatment abilities. At least seek out somebody that can give you digital radiographs as they'll show you much more detail. Most vets also have programs built into their digital radiograph computers that will give your trimmer or farrier if you choose therapeutic shoeing precise measurements they can use to make some adjustments here.

As for the trimmer, these feet are incredibly challenging. I really cringed when my vet told me to experiment with my horse using wedge pads and different methods of shoeing and he didn't have a really drastic problem. However, what I see here does call for a wedge pad and possibly more. He needs something that will alleviate the strain on the soft tissues at the back of the foot. Wedging, in this case, would return his correct angle so the ligaments, tendons and other tissues can breathe a sigh of relief. Yes, it will also help with circulation because you have think that everything is being squashed down there. If veins and arteries are feeling the pinch, so will everything else. With that impaired bloodflow, tissues don't exchange oxygen, nutrients or remove wastes properly. Makes sense that he abscesses doesn't it. I have a really strong feeling that if you take this horse Texas A&M, wegdes will be in there treatment regimen. If they do call for that, I would also be sure to inquire about a time frame and workloads. I think I said on it another thread that I've seen good therapeutic shoeing fail when the horse was worked too hard or left in "whatever works the longest".

Bony column alignment is a large part of soundness in horses. They can only tolerate so much until they can't take it anymore. Worse than that, some horses just aren't built to last or handle any kind of life, from a conformation POV. Just look at all the damage that Missy is trying to reverse on Hero. His Xrays are just as alarming.

Edited by ..::Felda::.., 28 September 2009 - 01:21 PM.

Is it possible to stay on topic to what the thread is about? Or has the population become so distracted it must resort to addressing every little allusion thus changing the direction of this thread and losing the topic? Have we lost the ability to recognize this problem and just start a new topic if the oppportunity arises? Please do so now if you feel so inclined to seek attention.


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#19 JMook

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 05:35 PM

Waller Equine Hospital! They are good, only 1 1/2 hours away from us!

#20 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 05:37 PM

I went back to find your first pics you posted of him last year and can't find them. Can you post them for comparison?
Is it possible to stay on topic to what the thread is about? Or has the population become so distracted it must resort to addressing every little allusion thus changing the direction of this thread and losing the topic? Have we lost the ability to recognize this problem and just start a new topic if the oppportunity arises? Please do so now if you feel so inclined to seek attention.


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#21 baylee

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 08:53 PM

I took him to waller equine in october 08 and had xrays done, they werent much help either, they told me he had ringbone but my current vet now said there is no ringbone....i dont know who to believe.

Here are pictures from the past...

this is the right front, first pic is 2 yrs ago and second was taken 7/18/08


left...


and these are from today..





if you go to my first post on this topic there is a link to past pictures too, but my computer crashed recently and i lost most of my pictures...if you cant get to the previous pictures from that link let me know and i will save them and then attach those...they may be the sames ones i just posted though, ill have to check.
My Boys:
Cash Sierra Classic 'Lil Man' - '93 AQHA gelding
Smart Kit 'Hef' - '04 AQHA gelding

Weed Patrol (pygmy goats):
Buddy, Bucky, Buttercup, Bella, Baya, Curly, and Boomer

Keeper of the goats (dog patrol):
Muffin- 6 yr old mini donkey

Dogs:
Joker- 10 yr old boxer
Denali- 2 yr old boxer
Teal - 3 yr old lab
Chico- 3 yr old chihuahua
Smoki- hes a cat, but thinks hes a dog...

#22 baylee

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:21 PM

i just saved the pics from my old post and put them beside each other to make it a lil easier to compare... the pics from 2008 were right after a trim..the pics from today the trim is 4wks old...i wish i had a fresh trim on them so you can see, his hoof capsule seems much smaller now.

Oct. 2008 Left, then under that is todays pic



Oct 2008 Right, then todays


My Boys:
Cash Sierra Classic 'Lil Man' - '93 AQHA gelding
Smart Kit 'Hef' - '04 AQHA gelding

Weed Patrol (pygmy goats):
Buddy, Bucky, Buttercup, Bella, Baya, Curly, and Boomer

Keeper of the goats (dog patrol):
Muffin- 6 yr old mini donkey

Dogs:
Joker- 10 yr old boxer
Denali- 2 yr old boxer
Teal - 3 yr old lab
Chico- 3 yr old chihuahua
Smoki- hes a cat, but thinks hes a dog...

#23 JMook

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 08:00 AM

Personally any of our local vet I do not trust, unless it is something simple, like yearly shots or something small. I heard that there is a very good equine vet over off 242, going towards the auction place, just after you make the turn off of 242 at 1485 I believe. Several people I know have used them for emergencies, then there is an other one in Livingston off of 150 going west, a good ways from 59, but closer the A&M. Sorry can't remember the names. Then there is Doc Mary out of Coldsprings, she is who I use, she does make farm calls, on Thrusdays, I have been using her for years, I believe she will come to your place, you aren't that far from me. Anyway, good luck

#24 jumpin_horses

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 08:35 AM

I went to a seminar at MSU a few years back where they talked about "bone infections" and they are very serious. basically, they said, that they need to be taken in and have the bone flushed with antibiotics for several days.

check out the seminar series at MSU: http://cvm.msu.edu/h...-seminar-series

first aid for your horse
what happens if your horse gets hurt
what to do if your horse gets hurt.

unfortunately, there isnt any audio on some of them.. grr!

FYI - there are some other great seminar series there too, if you want to check them out.

- Where knowledge ends, brutality begins.
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#25 baylee

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 10:45 AM

jmook, thank you! i will look into those...a&m is expensive, i will try those first and see what they have to say.

jumpin, thanks for the info, ill get to reading!
My Boys:
Cash Sierra Classic 'Lil Man' - '93 AQHA gelding
Smart Kit 'Hef' - '04 AQHA gelding

Weed Patrol (pygmy goats):
Buddy, Bucky, Buttercup, Bella, Baya, Curly, and Boomer

Keeper of the goats (dog patrol):
Muffin- 6 yr old mini donkey

Dogs:
Joker- 10 yr old boxer
Denali- 2 yr old boxer
Teal - 3 yr old lab
Chico- 3 yr old chihuahua
Smoki- hes a cat, but thinks hes a dog...

#26 barefootlena

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 10:55 AM

If it was me and I was spending the money anyway, I would stick with A&M. They have all the equipment readily available to do whatever needs to be done, and a full compliment of various specialists. Their quaility of care is second to none, and you get more than your money's worth. That said, I've used or had clients use nearly all of the vets that JMook suggested. Where feet are concerned, Dr. Pullen off 1488 would be your best bet, but even he refers hard cases to A&M. A&M's fees aren't much higher than most of the other horse clinics. You have a horse that has a history of unresolved trouble with his feet. You've already spent quite a bit getting to where you are now, and while it might take a bit more, you'll be better off in the long run. I would hate to see you, and Little Man, drag around from one vet to another, simply because the issues couldn't be determined efficiently. If you are able to get an appointment with Dr. Honnas at A&M, rest assured you'll be in good hands.
A horse that is right in his feet is right in his mind.

#27 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 12:28 PM

You know, his feet remind me of Skye's feet. They've been hard to make progress with as I see this guy's feet haven't changed much in a year either. Nearly all the probems then are still present now. Has you trimmer seen this comparison? Sometime it's easy to think you're making tons of progress only to be stuck in delusional rut.

Good luck with getting him vetted by a good vet. I had that nightmare too except I'm not near a Uni or major equine hospital.
Is it possible to stay on topic to what the thread is about? Or has the population become so distracted it must resort to addressing every little allusion thus changing the direction of this thread and losing the topic? Have we lost the ability to recognize this problem and just start a new topic if the oppportunity arises? Please do so now if you feel so inclined to seek attention.


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#28 baylee

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 02:55 PM

barefootlena- Thank you for that information and you're right, their fees are not much higher at all, i called them and i am going to look at some finances and see when i can make an appointment. Hopefully they wont have to keep him to long because boarding there is $60 a night. And you're also right about issues not being determined efficiently...every vet i have gone to has found something new but only for the next vet to say no thats not it....waste of my money, im going to cut the middle man and go straight to a&m. save money and time, which are both running out.

felda- i just recently emailed comparison pictures to the trimmer, he hasnt trimmed since hes seen them though. and there really hasnt been much change in the past year with his feet. He has been more sound than before, but like you said we are in a rut and arent moving forward anymore....im guessing the only thing i can do is get him to a good vet who KNOWS what they are looking at and fix his issues before we can make anymore progress.
thanks for the all the help so far!

My Boys:
Cash Sierra Classic 'Lil Man' - '93 AQHA gelding
Smart Kit 'Hef' - '04 AQHA gelding

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#29 Southerngurl01

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 05:03 PM

It takes a large amount of garlic to cause a problem in horses. A pound or more. Since the mix I mentioned is only 1/6 garlic extract, it would be extremely hard to overdose. Just an FYI.
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#30 missyclare

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 12:41 AM

Sure would like to see solar shots of the LF. The Rf looks to be doing well, though both heels are jamming and still pulled forward. The LF looks like the coronary band is prolapsing. It looked better in the old pictures, balance-wise, despite the pathology. Something has happened between then and now. Show me the trim.

I also vote for a&m. Good xrays, good pinpointing of the problem, expert care. Serious stuff. Wishing Pete Ramey was your next door neighbor.

No use soaking when its not draining. Clean is good, dry is not. Dry hardens the sole and makes for a harder barrier for any drainage and promotes hole closure, interrupts drainage and as you've seen, horse instantly lame. Personally, I give thanks that that last hole is still working and providing a hole to drain through. When you see drainage coming out of that hole...go for it and "pull" Epsom salt and water soaks and nothing antiseptic to drive the infection upwards...."pull". Epsom salt also promotes new hoof horn and hole closure and although its a good thing for pulling, don't overdo it. Change it up with plain water or Borax and water. Let him stand on a towel afterwards to get some air before wrapping to keep clean inbetween.

Remember Slinky, Hoofgirl?

I nursed a horse for a couple of years before the owner got her own place and took over. Its a long story, but I'll mention some key points:

Blood test: If the horse is fighting an infection, the white cell count will be up. If the infection is old, the white count may not be up any longer, like the horse has quit fighting it and accepted it.

Soaked 2x/day for 20 minutes, let dry and wrapped to keep clean. Used only Epsom Salts at first and kept having to trim that hoof because it grew faster. Then started changing things up as mentioned above.

Horse abscessed atleast 4-6 times per year for 5 years. Magnetics used to improve blood circulation. This was a thorn dead center of the frog. Vet had follow it to get it out and that's where the hole was...always there, always where the drainage was. Owner put a Davis boot on with Epsom Salt and water and turned the horse outside to move, wrapped at night. Horse re-abscessed everytime the ground got hard and aggravated things.

Then I learned the barefoot trim. Took new xrays and blood test. Blood test showed no fighting of infection going on. Xrays showed bone changes and vet described it as the infection travelling around the hoof at will and feeding off the bone. Lovely.

Hired a barefoot trimmer cause I felt the whole thing was over my head. Ended up firing her 3 months later. Abscesses still happening. Had to do some serious trimming to get the hoof back under control. 3"...yup...3" stretched white line and the whole nine yards. For a whole year, not one abscess, then she had one, hole still there, but since I had the foot back where it belonged, it blew out the heel bulb big time and was a drag because "any" boot was a discomfort to her. I taught owner how to trim and she took over and has not abscessed since, (two years) but hoof is still favoured slightly. Hole in frog is closed. This is a RR hoof. The horse is 21 now, retired and still enjoying life. It took some fierce love on the owner's part, as this is only half of the story. A year before this thorn, she came to me right off the operating table with 3 broken hock bones on the other rear foot. I fully credit the barefoot trim for the comfort and years she is now enjoying.