Quantcast

Jump to content

Photo

Mud Fever


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Goldiebabe

Goldiebabe

    Daydreaming about horses

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,936 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Oklahoma

Posted 04 October 2009 - 04:27 PM

When I went to see my horses today, I noticed my 11 year old Quarter Horse mare, Goldie, had scratches on her left hind leg right around her pastern. It is worse than I have seen it before, but I know it is because she has been in a muddy, wet pasture lately. It has been wet and rainy a lot lately and I have her pastured 24/7. I have been researching on the best treatment for the mud fever, and want your advice as well. The best I have seen is to shave the area, apply Chlorhexidine solution on it to get rid of the scabs, and apply a good antiseptic cream to the area.

Of course keeping it clean and dry is important, but I am worried about this. There are stalls at the place I board her, but I would have to talk to my friends about stalling her. And is it really necessary to stall her while she heals? Also, what kind of ointment do you recommend using on it and how often to clean/treat the area? I cannot go out there more than once a day because she is boarded at least 26 miles from my house. I don't know when exactly she developed the mud fever because I have not been out there in a week (not because I didn't want to, but because I have had other things going on with my baby, family, etc. and the weather has been awful in the way that I didn't want to expose my young baby to the wind, cold, rain, etc.).

Here are a couple pictures of her mud fever




Thanks in advance for the help!

---*Lexi*---
Proud mom to Connor, born 8/23/09! Surrogate twin girls "A" and "M" born 2/21/13!
Furbabies: Ash, Phoebe,Taj, and Schrodinger (cats) and Sampson (Holland Lop bunny)
Reptiles: Winky (Leopard gecko) and Kenyan Sand Boa (working on name). 

I met: Paintluvr, Jess*N*Bodie*, Tuckit, Tuckaway, Pride's Zippin Candy, GiddyUpHighly, elfinbien, nycowboy19, qhchick0220, BornConfused, JenniferLVAQHA, Halo's mom, Running_Free, illinois racer, Dragon, KuroReiAnge, and Rollin_after_a_bath, redneckcowgirlmn, and robertbel1! Who's next?!


#2 Indy

Indy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 858 posts
  • Location:Canada

Posted 04 October 2009 - 04:48 PM

other thread on scratches

Try this thread. It had a lot of good ideas. I've used desitin (diaper rash cream). I just shaved the area and picked all the scabs off. Twice a day I apply the cream. I am looking into getting some of the athlete's foot powder spray to see how that works. I find if i miss a day (it's too wet) that the scabs come back very quickly.
Chelsea
*May God Bless you
*Rest in Peace my Kahlua - July 5, 1994 -- Aug. 11, 2005

#3 ozland

ozland

    I'm an optimist. I think most people are half full of it.

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 45,280 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA

Posted 04 October 2009 - 08:06 PM

I tried the spray, not much help. The athletes foot cream is much better. Tinactin or Lotrimin are the best ones.

S'cuse me, gotta go iron my birthday suit.

For those who believe, no explanation is necessary.
For those who do not, no explanation will suffice.
.................Joseph Dunninger


Calling an illegal alien an undocumented immigrant is like calling
a drug dealer an unlicensed pharmacist


#4 Loves-to-Ride

Loves-to-Ride

    Trail Rider

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 265 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Switzerland

Posted 05 October 2009 - 02:30 AM

The only remedy that I have found effective was given to me by a neighbor who has cows. I tried a commercial product and the Destin without results. It is a homemade mixture of 1 TB sulfur powder mixed with 1/2 cup of Eutrin (this is a petroleum product used to keep cow udders soft and sanitized). Do an initial cleaning with a Betadine wash of the entire affected area and completely dry it. Use a stiff paint brush to apply to the paste. I make up a different pot for each affected pastern and each pot has it's own paintbrush to avoid cross contamination of the bacteria. The area must be kept dry. Never wrap the affected area. Use a clean towel to remove scabs and clean the area twice daily and re-apply product. A separate towel for each leg.
The horse should not be turned into a wet environment. We located the source of infection in the pasture and found it necessary to install drainage, remove the wet soil which contained the bacteria and replaced it with fresh top soil and bark chips.
It cleared up completely in around 3 weeks and I saw improvement with the inflammation in 2 days.
Good luck.
Ride long and prosper!

Love your family and horses. All else that is good in life will follow!

#5 Zinge

Zinge

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,645 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NY

Posted 05 October 2009 - 08:13 AM

I used athletes foot spray and it worked wonders and its convenient. Is your horse brought in twice a day for feeding? You might be able to get your friend to put some spray on her once a day and you could do once a day, only takes a minute. Also to help keep it dry, you could try bell boots, I did that once years ago. Of course if the horse steps in mud it doesnt help but if they are shuffling through wet grass it will help to keep the area a little dryer. Just remember, if you are putting them on for the first time, stand clear during the first few steps.

#6 Goldiebabe

Goldiebabe

    Daydreaming about horses

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,936 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Oklahoma

Posted 05 October 2009 - 10:16 AM

Thanks everyone!

I actually have some Desitin at home since I have a baby, lol, so I may try that when I go out to see my horses today. I think the athlete's foot spray sounds good, too, though. I won't be able to apply it twice a day, unfortunately, but maybe I can talk to my friends about doing it for me? Goldie is really easy to treat. Very mellow.

Edited by Goldiebabe, 05 October 2009 - 10:17 AM.

---*Lexi*---
Proud mom to Connor, born 8/23/09! Surrogate twin girls "A" and "M" born 2/21/13!
Furbabies: Ash, Phoebe,Taj, and Schrodinger (cats) and Sampson (Holland Lop bunny)
Reptiles: Winky (Leopard gecko) and Kenyan Sand Boa (working on name). 

I met: Paintluvr, Jess*N*Bodie*, Tuckit, Tuckaway, Pride's Zippin Candy, GiddyUpHighly, elfinbien, nycowboy19, qhchick0220, BornConfused, JenniferLVAQHA, Halo's mom, Running_Free, illinois racer, Dragon, KuroReiAnge, and Rollin_after_a_bath, redneckcowgirlmn, and robertbel1! Who's next?!


#7 Wild Rose

Wild Rose

    Horse Maid

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 48,321 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Hibbing, MN

Posted 06 October 2009 - 06:56 AM

Hope you get it cleared up soon.

One thing to think about is the feathers on a horse's fetlocks. Clipping them increases the chances of scratches. Those long hairs are there to guide the water down to the ground instead of soaking the back of the pastern.

Of course, if the horse is standing in deep water and mud, that's a different situation.

BOARD BUDDY CLUB MEMBER I have met 33 board buddies!
MEMBER OF OZLAND SURVIVORS
MEMBER OF THE TURD POSSE - MSTRBKBHRWNS

Rosie, aka Hankie Doc

http://www.allbreedp....com/hankie doc

 

PrettyRosie-1.jpgChiefforsiggy-1-1-2.jpgIMG_0194cropped-1.jpg
Rosie....................Chief...........................Jedi
Rosie_in_the_mist.jpg
Rosie in the Mist

R.I.P. Snow Chief, August 25, 1980 - April 16, 2009
You were the best trail horse ever.


Old dogs and children, and watermelon wine...


#8 Dawn_Marie90

Dawn_Marie90

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NJ

Posted 06 October 2009 - 07:57 AM

I suggest using MTG. I worship this product (aside from the the not so nice bacon smell) as it is the cure-all for a lot of superficial problems on horses. It not only stops the the fungus, but it will also grow the hair back a lot faster too. Its CLINICALLY proven to grow 3 inches of mane/tail a month too (when done correctly per directions on bottle).

My rescue came to me with fungus EVERYWHERE and the MTG worked amazingly to regrow the hair! It worked faster than any other product I have tried and works better too, in my opinion.


If your horse is prone to mud fever, I highly suggest you clip her legs from the coronet right past the pastern. My one horse has some feathering and whenever I clipped his legs, it lessened the chance of getting mud fever A LOT.


~ Cowgirls Don't Cry ~ Ride Baby, Ride!

#9 WarPony

WarPony

    Teeny Tiny Equine Of DOOOM!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,598 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Michigan

Posted 06 October 2009 - 11:58 AM

QUOTE (Loves-to-Ride @ Oct 5 2009, 03:30 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It is a homemade mixture of 1 TB sulfur powder mixed with 1/2 cup of Eutrin (this is a petroleum product used to keep cow udders soft and sanitized).


Where did you find the sulfur powder? I can't seem to find any around here.

Warpony's blog! ... Warpony's Etsy Shop


“You can think I'm wrong, but that's no reason to quit thinking.” ~ Dr. Gregory House

#10 Wild Rose

Wild Rose

    Horse Maid

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 48,321 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Hibbing, MN

Posted 07 October 2009 - 07:30 AM

QUOTE (Dawn_Marie90 @ Oct 6 2009, 07:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I suggest using MTG. I worship this product (aside from the the not so nice bacon smell) as it is the cure-all for a lot of superficial problems on horses. It not only stops the the fungus, but it will also grow the hair back a lot faster too. Its CLINICALLY proven to grow 3 inches of mane/tail a month too (when done correctly per directions on bottle).

My rescue came to me with fungus EVERYWHERE and the MTG worked amazingly to regrow the hair! It worked faster than any other product I have tried and works better too, in my opinion.


If your horse is prone to mud fever, I highly suggest you clip her legs from the coronet right past the pastern. My one horse has some feathering and whenever I clipped his legs, it lessened the chance of getting mud fever A LOT.


Perhaps you were caught in a vicious circle. Clipping the fetlock hairs is necessary when the horse HAS mud fever. So, you clip, and the horse gets mud fever again, so you clip again.

No, you do not clip fetlock hairs unless your horse needs to be groomed for showing. Horses that live outside in the mud and rain, need those hairs to channel the water to the ground. Otherwise dirty water pools in the "cup" at the back of the hoof, causing scratches.

I have never clipped fetlock hairs....ever. And I have never had a case of scratches...ever.

BOARD BUDDY CLUB MEMBER I have met 33 board buddies!
MEMBER OF OZLAND SURVIVORS
MEMBER OF THE TURD POSSE - MSTRBKBHRWNS

Rosie, aka Hankie Doc

http://www.allbreedp....com/hankie doc

 

PrettyRosie-1.jpgChiefforsiggy-1-1-2.jpgIMG_0194cropped-1.jpg
Rosie....................Chief...........................Jedi
Rosie_in_the_mist.jpg
Rosie in the Mist

R.I.P. Snow Chief, August 25, 1980 - April 16, 2009
You were the best trail horse ever.


Old dogs and children, and watermelon wine...


#11 Dawn_Marie90

Dawn_Marie90

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NJ

Posted 07 October 2009 - 08:54 AM

Wild Rose,

I suppose you are correct too but I noticed that clipping the fetlock hair before the mud starts getting bad prevents quite a bit of fungus. My horse used to live in muddy paddocks and with the fetlock hair, the moisture, dirt, and manure would just never dry because it would just stay wet inside of the hair therefore creating a perfect breeding ground for fungus.

I no longer clip the fetlock hair (except for shows as you pointed out) as my horse has been living on grass so he hasn't gotten any fungus...

When horses are in quite a bit of mud, I personally like to cut the fetlock hair as a preventative measure. If its not muddy, I too like to keep the fetlock hair 'protection'.


~ Cowgirls Don't Cry ~ Ride Baby, Ride!

#12 Wild Rose

Wild Rose

    Horse Maid

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 48,321 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Hibbing, MN

Posted 07 October 2009 - 03:56 PM

Dawn, I guess if the horse is standing in deep, wet mud and can't find a dry place to stand, that would be a situation to trim fetlock hair. I think.

My horses are in deep mud (well, 5 inches or so, deep, in some places) in the spring, but they DO have areas where they can be out of the mud, too.

I have never worried about clipping because of the mud they are in, and so far, no scratches. ....watch, now that I said that, next spring I'll have my first case! rolleye0014.gif

BOARD BUDDY CLUB MEMBER I have met 33 board buddies!
MEMBER OF OZLAND SURVIVORS
MEMBER OF THE TURD POSSE - MSTRBKBHRWNS

Rosie, aka Hankie Doc

http://www.allbreedp....com/hankie doc

 

PrettyRosie-1.jpgChiefforsiggy-1-1-2.jpgIMG_0194cropped-1.jpg
Rosie....................Chief...........................Jedi
Rosie_in_the_mist.jpg
Rosie in the Mist

R.I.P. Snow Chief, August 25, 1980 - April 16, 2009
You were the best trail horse ever.


Old dogs and children, and watermelon wine...