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Sending A Barefoot Horse To The Trainers


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#1 This Is It

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 01:57 PM

So, I am sending my mustang off to the trainer again to be finished out. He's barefoot and I'd REALLY like to keep him that way. He has amazing feet, frogs are really starting to grow in nicely. However, he's stall and pasture kept, so doesn't have a lot of opportunity to develop sole made to go over rocks and gravel soundly. The last time I sent him to the trainer they started trail riding him and he bruised really bad, had a bruised bar for about 3 months, it took quite a while to clear it up and it was borderline abcess. I'm seriously lucky it DIDN'T abcess.... I don't want that to happen again and have been thinking of having him shod before he goes. I do have boots for him, but if they don't put them on right, they are gonna twist or come off and will cause even more problems.

What do you think? Shoe, then rehab when he comes home? Also, since shoes only protect the outside of his foot, would I be better to put a shoe and pad on him? Or just a shoe? I have a farrier friend that will come tack a shoe on him to my specifications, I won't allow anyone to trim his sole, even setting him up for a shoe.

I just hate to put a shoe on him... The thought of tacking a shoe on that pretty, healthy hoof just makes me wanna cry...

Sarah

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#2 Trinity

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 03:29 PM

Id shoe this horse. Trainers dont usually take kindly to fussing with boots and the horse needs protection. Try these...http://plastichorseshoes.com/
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#3 loopyhorse

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 09:15 PM

I'm no expert so I don't know if it would be effective, but aren't there glue on shoes? That way you at least aren't growing out nail holes and such later... Somebody here can probably tell you if it would be worth it and what ones are good.
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#4 Graywolf 1

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 11:09 PM

Trinity, I sent my horse off last year for a tune up and wondered the same thing. He's never had shoes or boots on up here in the mountains. My pasture is a rock pile. Lol! He did just fine and it made a believer out of the trainer, too. Could be genetics too? Anyhow, no shoes will ever go on this boy if I can help it! All three of my boys are barefoot, and in almost nine years here I have only one get an abscess. Go figure! :confused0024:

#5 Trinity

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 12:54 AM

I am normally with you on that, but this statement in the OP makes the say shoes....

"However, he's stall and pasture kept, so doesn't have a lot of opportunity to develop sole made to go over rocks and gravel soundly. The last time I sent him to the trainer they started trail riding him and he bruised really bad, had a bruised bar for about 3 months, it took quite a while to clear it up and it was borderline abcess. I'm seriously lucky it DIDN'T abcess"

It isnt fair to the horse to be asked to work hard barefoot if he hasnt been set up to succeed barefoot. Successful barefoot horses live in similar environments to what they are asked to work in or we generally need to boot them. Plus most trainers just will not fuss with booting due to time and bootin issues. IME, the rubber shoes are the most unobtrusive and the nail holes grow out quickly. the biggest thing is to not allow the farrier to carve the sole or rasp alot of toe from the bottom. Just enough to seat the shoe.

Also, IME, horses that are raised turned out with good foot care and no shoeing while they are young tend to ALL develop proper great feet no matter the breed. Its the ones that are neglected with no hoof care as youngsters left out in muck pits and never seeing much movement good diet or a farrier that seem to get shoes tacked on as a 2 or 3 yo because of sucky feet. The ones that are turned out and allowed to develop and mature a good foot on hard rough terrain have amazing feet, breed aside.

ETA the other option might be Sole Guard, but be aware that hard work makes it not last very long. You also might look into the Perfect Hoof Wear system for a no nail rubber shoe.



Edited by Trinity, 10 April 2012 - 01:00 AM.

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#6 Zoe84

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 03:47 AM

Hmm I too am wondering this - having a filly broken in (for the first time ever, pretty scary but exciting at the same time!) she has wonderful feet, has been self trimming for her whole life and they look great. But I have a feeling the guy will say, Ok she's in full work now, let's throw some shoes on her. What will I say? What if I say no and she goes sore and he says I told you so?!

#7 Trinity

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 05:27 AM

Young horses typically need protection of some sort for in depth training just because their feet and lateral cartilages are not fully developed yet and they usually get an intensive 30 to 90 days of work. Better to shoe and avoid injury IMO. When they come home, pull the shoes and condition the feet as normal as the foot grows. I think that is a good compromise and still protects the horse when he is being asked to really work the first time. Sore feet will hinder his training, make him trippy and possible make him injured as well.


There are exceptions to this and some young horses have great well developed feet that have been out and moving around alot over rough terrain. In those cases Id wait and see if the horse was sensitive before shoeing. Most trainers are willing to do that but will tell you when its time for protection.
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#8 This Is It

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 08:36 AM

Well, I spoke with the trainer and without asking her to do it, she volunteered to boot him. She's not a big "lets shoe him" type, and she plans to do a lot of arena work with him, so doesn't think there is a reason to shoe him unless he REALLY needs it. So, for now, we're going barefoot with his renegades for trail riding. If, down the road, she decides the boots just don't work, then we'll put shoes on him, but only if the farrier agrees to leave the sole alone. Otherwise, I'm looking at glue on, or something along those lines. I really don't want to ruin his feet, they are a thing of beauty :)

Greywolf - your horse was transition to rocks, mine isn't. Our pasture is soft (for the most part), then he's in his stall. Sometimes he's out in the big arena, and that's hard, but its not all the time that he's out there. If it was pea gravel out there, or even dirty sand, I'd have him out there every day. Its red clay, tho, and when it gets slightly wet, its nasty muddy, gets slick and deep fast, and then it kinda defeats the purpose. We do trail ride, but I don't get near as much ride time as I would like. If I could take him out 3 times a week, then I wouldn't worry about it. We do have gravel and road to work on, her trails, tho, have big ole rocks that he has to climb. He's game to do it, but he came up pretty sore last year and I don't want to go through that again...

Thanks for the advice, I really appreciate it :smileywavey: I hope the boots work for him, tho, and then I won't have to stress about tacking shoes on him.

Sarah

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Tell me it can't be done, and I will do it.
Tell me the goal is too high, and I will reach it.
Place an obstacle in front of me, and I will leap over it.
Challenge me, dare me or even defy me.
But do not underestimate me.
For on the back of my American Quarter Horse, anything is possible.

 


#9 missyclare

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 11:57 AM

Glad to hear the the trainer is willing to work with boots. I would try to be there to see if the hoof needs to be tweaked at week 4 and to check up on his training etc. If you are the "trimmer" for this foot, I wouldn't let anyone else touch them, unless shoes came into the mix. Make sure she has lots of replacement pads for those boots.

Zoe...same to you. Bare feet, but maintain it for the duration. Don't let things get out of whack concerning anything. Remember, lifestyle and diet will be changing. Do not fear anyone mentioning shoes. I don't care if its the Queen of England saying it, YOU are the boss and the only one who can advocate for your horse. If it rubs you the wrong way...stand you ground....for the horse.

I'd feel better if both of you make the trip to check up on things at week 4 and leaving with optimal trim at the beginning. If the word shoes does come into play somewhere along the line, I'd go up there then and see for myself with hoof in hand before its done. If that hoof was surviving well, I'd say no to shoes.

#10 This Is It

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 12:44 PM

I trim him myself and go up every weekend. She welcomes the owners, and makes sure they are part of the horse's training. I was up there every weekend but a few last year and will be doing the same thing this year. Every other week is the longest I will go without making the trip. Helps that my friend is sending her colt to the same place, we can share the drive :)

Sarah

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Tell me it can't be done, and I will do it.
Tell me the goal is too high, and I will reach it.
Place an obstacle in front of me, and I will leap over it.
Challenge me, dare me or even defy me.
But do not underestimate me.
For on the back of my American Quarter Horse, anything is possible.

 


#11 Trinity

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 02:49 PM

The trainer sounds like a keeper.
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#12 KatyB

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 03:25 PM

I love this trainer!

I've had two friends have this issue. The first one, the trainer insisted that he'd need shoes. Friend said let's try barefoot and see what happens. Trainer now believes it is possible for a horse to train successfully with him for three months barefoot. That was great.

Another friend sent a horse off 9 days ago. Horse is six, neglected until a few months ago, now with a barefoot trimmer. He came up lame after 4-5 days of training, just groundwork, I think. I haven't heard what they've done yet. I don't think shoes for the next three weeks will be a huge deal either way, but I wonder what is wrong w/ either the feet or the training that problems have come up that fast.

I would certainly want to see how my horse did before considering alternatives. The prior bruising would certainly worry me.
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#13 Smilie

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 12:09 PM

It would depend on what type of training. If the horse is just being ridden in an arena and some light riding on mainly grass or sand, I would leave the horse barefoot
On the other hand, if the horse is being trained for trail riding, and going over ground he has not had a chance to adapt to, then he needs to be shod
Just read that your trainer is willing to boot, as needed.
My horses are all barefoot when being started under saddle. They are only shod once they are going out into the mountains (or booted )
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#14 Zoe84

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 12:00 AM

Thanks Missy as always for your words of wisdom!! :) :)

#15 This Is It

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 11:27 AM

Oh yes, she's def a keeper! She is absolutely amazing. That's why my horse is going to her again to be finished out AND why my friend is sending her colt to her to be started. :) She did the impossible last year. She taught my big, reactive, scared mustang to relax and think. Two other trainers said he would ALWAYS be reactive and would probably never grow out of it. He's just green broke, so we have our moments. But I spend more time asking him to SPEED UP, than relax and work :) Never thought I'd have to encourage him to move faster LOL

Sarah

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Tell me it can't be done, and I will do it.
Tell me the goal is too high, and I will reach it.
Place an obstacle in front of me, and I will leap over it.
Challenge me, dare me or even defy me.
But do not underestimate me.
For on the back of my American Quarter Horse, anything is possible.

 


#16 Zoe84

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 04:26 AM

Well I got my filly back from the trainers, and despite me specifically asking him to not shoe her he put fronts on her and charged me for them!! Grrr, I'm pretty cranky. Also (you might have seen in another thread) the second ride I had on her once she was home she threw me into a fence! I don't know whether or not to take it up with him. Plus he charged me $800 more than what he quoted me.
Phew! Horses are exhausting aren't they :)
Actually make that humans, and Life in General.

#17 storey

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 12:28 PM

so much for him being a keeper of a trainer :(

#18 Southerngurl01

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 05:22 PM

GRRRRR I would let him know I have a big mouth! (well I do, don't know about you :happy0203: )
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#19 hero 'n ponie

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 06:13 PM

Well I got my filly back from the trainers, and despite me specifically asking him to not shoe her he put fronts on her and charged me for them!! Grrr, I'm pretty cranky. Also (you might have seen in another thread) the second ride I had on her once she was home she threw me into a fence! I don't know whether or not to take it up with him. Plus he charged me $800 more than what he quoted me.
Phew! Horses are exhausting aren't they :)
Actually make that humans, and Life in General.


Don't know about you, but this would be lawsuit territory for me if it was my horse.