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#1 SkipsInvested

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 01:25 PM

I have a great old barrel saddle that Id love to clean and get back into good condition. Question number 1: The skirt is round and the sides are flaring. Is there anyway to reshape them? How and what should I use to form them? Question number 2: Some of the "shiny" finish is gone and almost similar to rough out in places. Its a fully tooled saddle except for the seat. How do I get that shiny finish back to it? Oil doesn't do it and Ive tried hand buffing it but nothing. It just stays looking like roughout in sections. Question number 3: The saddle horn rawhide is loose. Anyway to help tighten it up? It also has a metal horn underneath. Any ideas would be great! Im clueless and have all but given up but it is an amazing riding saddle. I just need to get it looking good again and get me a couple of saddle D-rings for the breastcollar which it lacks. lol. I just cant stand the thought of getting rid of it, but whats not used needs to go and I'd like it to look good.
he trots the air and the earth sings --Shakespear

#2 Jack Baumgartner

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 12:55 AM

It would help if you could post some photos of the saddle.

For the flaaring, saddles like a drink of water. Get the leather wet and put the saddle onto something round, then put a cinch over the thing and fasten it tight until the leather dries.

For the leather wearing, Tandy/Leather Factory sells a coating called Super Sheen, and another, not so shiny called Satin Sheen. You'd have to remove any waxes or oils before you used these products.

I don't know how loose the rawhide horn cover is, so I have no idea how to fix it. Perhaps someone else can help.
Saddletramp