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So I Got A Peruvian:)

peruvian paso gaits questions trail riding bits saddles

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#1 Meghan0717

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 05:45 PM

Hi All,

 

After tons of you guys help I finally bought a horse! She is a Peruvian Paso and her gait agrees wonderfully with my neck and back. So excited:)

 

We went on our first trail ride at home and she was great. Didn't spook at anything, tore right through the thick spots in the trail, she picks out the best places for her and her rider, she would gait really fast and smooth out in front of my sisters QH mare but when they wanted to go slow I would put her behind and she would drop down to a slow comfortable walk. 

 

We do have a few issues. One of which she isn't used to the mounting block so she wants to walk off or step to the side, another thing she does is once I am on she wants to bolt forward. Kinda crazy but she flexes so I just pull her around and she stops. I think these will be easy fixes with a little work. I have been following Warwick Schiller on Youtube and just love his methods.

 

Another problem is she was a rescue and had apparently been abused. She is not too keen on new people but warms up nicely, she REALLY doesn't like men and absolutely hates the farrier who last trimmed her. Apparently they had a bad time of it and the lady just stopped picking up her feet for fear she would freak out on her like she did with the farrier. We've been working with her and I think she will get better. Just a few minutes of working with her before her vet check and the vet was able to do full flexion and hoof sensitivity tests on her with out too much of a fuss. Luckily the vet was a lady:)

 

One thing is she is never aggressive about anything. If she does anything its away from you and not in a threatening way... you can tell she is just scared sometimes.

 

Now on the trail was a whole other matter...lol... she was scared of nothing! 

 

I have enclosed a few pics. As you can tell she is a bit chunky! She was out on 35 acres of grass. The vet says Puruvians are prone to metabolic syndrome? I think. So she says the best thing is no grass or limited amounts... which is great considering thats exactly what we have... no grass...lol. 

 

I am going to post a few questions in other topics but if your here and not there here they are.

 

Gaited Saddles? Opinions?  I ride in an Aussie and I think she definitely gaited better in it than she did in a western saddle they were riding her with. 

 

Peruvian Bits? Opinions?  They were riding her in a shanked snaffle with copper rollers. I have her in a shanked dog bone type bit that is thick. The chomps on it the whole ride but seems to respond well to it. I am wondering if getting an actual bit made for peruvians will help with her gait or be easier on her mouth? I am really not sure beside the obvious...ie gag bit.... what denotes making a bit harsh or soft.... i want to use the mildest thing on her I can. 

 

Grain and Hay? Right now she is on freshly baled Rye Grass Hay with a bit of hairy vetch in it and a tiny bit of 12% sweet feed at night. They get hay twice a day not free choice. I am thinking maybe she should have less sugar in her diet but not sure which direction to go in. We won't have bermuda hay for a few months now.

 

Peruvians? Any experience with the breed? Thoughts? She isn't papered and I don't know how the registries work... if I breed her to a periuvian down the road can i register the baby? what about breeding her to a TWH and registering the baby Tennuvian? possible if she is not papered? What I really want to do is one day breed her to a shuffling appaloosa:) They seem to have similar gates and I love the spots! (If you can tell in one of the pics she actually has quite a bit of roaning on one of her hind quarters.)

 

The first two pics are from the first day I rode her.... the last pic is after we got her home. 

 

 

 

 

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#2 okate

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 10:29 PM

Sweet face, diffinately peruvian composition.

About saddles, looking on tackfinders, there's peruvian saddle and tack in Monroe, Wa.

I could eyeball it for you if it looks interesting to you.

Hope your farrier's a woman too if she doesn't trust men.

The few I've been around were very sweet-tempered, but at the same time hot(Brio?)

They used Bosals and not sure of the bits.

Seemed they kinda paddle their front legs to me, don't know what else to call it. Ramble,ramble...

Anyway, have lots of fun with your new ride....     what's her name, Chica? Rosa. Esmarelda?


Edited by okate, 22 May 2013 - 11:08 PM.

WARNING! Half this post is JMO, some fraction of it is BS, the rest is my contribution to the subject,GOI.


#3 Meghan0717

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 10:26 AM

The people who owned her before named her tequila el larosa..... We are calling her Quila:) Going to check out Tackfinder! She definitely has Brio! In any other horse you would think at any minute she was going to go bat **** crazy! The lady who had her treated her just like that too... super cautious... which really only added to her sensitivity. My sister and I are really loud around her and don't try to handle her with kid gloves... she warms up to things very quickly that way. 

 

She shakes like a little chihuahua... it's crazy! But she is super laid back 98% of the time(of course when your on her back she will really move out if you want her to)... and the 2% shes not is just lack of experience... nothing dangerous or aggressive about the horse at all! She is about 7 years old.



#4 Sereno

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 04:35 PM

Hello from a Paso Fino owner.  The Peruvians ARE from the Paso Fino line.  Being that Peru was somewhat isolated, they bred for different needs and limited stock going back hundreds of years.  But they are from the same Spanish Paso Fino's that arrived in 1494.

 

Not knowing how your horse was trained it will take you some time and learning the tack and cues IF it was trained Paso Fino.

 

Mounting block?  Most Paso's are 14 to 15.5 h. and the stirrups are set LONG so your leg is extended with only a slight bend at the knee and your foot FORWARD while riding.  Saddle.  Paso's need the correct fit.  See:  http://www.ranchodelrey.net .

 

Bites and side reins are important to a properly trained Paso.  TWO hands for proper corto and largo.  You may have to teach your horse how to walk.  You in the saddle and someone leading to break that trained corto and largo.  I had to.

 

Got to go, and get in before the storm outside my door.


If you don't see the World differently while riding a horse, then you should not be on one!


#5 Sereno

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 05:06 PM

Ok.  Back and only a little wet.    What is the "RED warning stuff in okate's" post mean?

 

Sounds like you own my wife's gelding Chican, a little larger Paso out of the Colombian line.  A sweet horse with her but he was abused by a man so it took a long time for him and I to get to know each other.  LOTS  of ground work and play.  Shoes?  After over 5 years we get the front ones on with my wife pouring out molasses... back ones are bare foot.  Don't sweat the small stuff.

 

I try to read your post and try to note your concerns and you have several.  Find out HOW the horse was trained and for what discipline.  What tack was used and how trained.  We can progress quickly with that information.

 

How much experience with a gated horse or Paso have you had.  I'm not trying to insult you but it was a whole NEW learning for my wife and self when we changed.


If you don't see the World differently while riding a horse, then you should not be on one!


#6 Meghan0717

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 06:38 PM

No experience with gaited horses or Paso's/Peruvians.

 

This mare was trained with clinton anderson like techniques. No paso training at all... she was being ridden in a snaffle and a western saddle.

 

Re: Mounting Block. I am 5.2 and have a bulging disk in my neck that does not allow me to pull myself into the saddle without a lot of pain. I am not strong enough to just hop up there....lol. So mounting block or downed trees along the trail are my options...lol. I can mount from the ground if necessary but my neck implores that I avoid it! 



#7 kitten-kat

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 11:11 PM

I know well that feeling myself... I feel for ya.


yes I am dyslexic, and no i dont have spell check anymore.. sorry..

 

Great place for Utah, and those Visitng Utah can come find a friend or a safe group, to ride with

https://www.facebook...ahtrailfriends/

Proudly Owned by "Daniel", an 04 Buckskin Tennuvian Gelding, and "Lrya", a beautiful little 2.5 year old  Buckskin Peruvian Paso filly.  Both bring a lot of joy and sanity to my life. I cant wait for the riding seasons..

Please Click On my Baby Dragon Eggs and Baby Dragons so they will grow up big and strong.

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#8 okate

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 01:44 AM

I'm really harmless, we had a problem with sarcasm a while back.

 

Glad someone can tell her more about Peruvians.

I worked and boarded at a barn that had lots of them years ago.

They are a whole different kind of horse, yes?


WARNING! Half this post is JMO, some fraction of it is BS, the rest is my contribution to the subject,GOI.


#9 Sereno

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:29 AM

No experience with gaited horses or Paso's/Peruvians.

 

This mare was trained with clinton anderson like techniques. No paso training at all... she was being ridden in a snaffle and a western saddle.

 

Re: Mounting Block. I am 5.2 and have a bulging disk in my neck that does not allow me to pull myself into the saddle without a lot of pain. I am not strong enough to just hop up there....lol. So mounting block or downed trees along the trail are my options...lol. I can mount from the ground if necessary but my neck implores that I avoid it! 

 

 

Well.  Now you are going to make this difficult.  lol.

 

Sorry about your neck.  My wife and I are 5'6" and in our 60's.  We didn't want a tall horse and needed a smooth ride.  Our Paso's are perfect for us.

 

You indicate that that your horse still has her corto and largo gate but never had Paso type training so cues and training her and you would take a long time.  It also sounds like you both are fine with what you do but just need to get to know each other and make a few adjustments.

 

Not everything will work for you being that horse and riders are different.

 

I spent a lot of  time on the ground with our horses in a small corral just working with them on lead and then just playing.  Lot's of carrots.  Just getting to know each other and build up trust.  At that time both were 7 yo, Sereno a stallion and Chican the abused gelding.  Both trained for show and not very well done I learned later.  Riding in the ring and l learning a different way of riding.  It took forever to get Sereno to leave the ranch with lots of BIG rearing and his backing.  It took time and we now can go anywhere with anyone.

 

Mounting.  If I got off Sereno in the field or corral, getting back on was a pain.  So I tied him to the fence and spent one hour just getting on and off over and over.  After about  days of that, no more problems anywhere.  You might have someone else do the mounting with the block to save your neck.

 

As for her bolting forward?  That is not a breed problem but a training issue that you have to work on.  Change bits?  When our horses get a little out of line we do a few tight circles and then stop.  With Sereno I always have a riding crop for the times that I need to get his attention.  Being that we use two sets of reins, those also are a tool for us but since your horse is not trained for double reins most likely not worth it.  So far these are training ideas that may NOT work for you or the horse and I'm sure others have different ideas.

 

Saddle.  We use the Tereque Trail Saddle made in Colombia for Paso Fino's.  Very comfortable on the horse and us.  We like that the sturrips are set in the proper position for our feet.  Please double check the hight of your horse and take some measurements to confirm a good fit.  Jan at  http://www.ranchodel...=Tereque Trail  is very easy to work with.  Being that Paso's are a smaller and more compact breed, finding anything to fit properly took some time.

 

I tried to post a couple of photos but It not working for me.  I'll have to re-read again.   :blink:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


Edited by Sereno, 30 May 2013 - 05:33 AM.

If you don't see the World differently while riding a horse, then you should not be on one!


#10 Sereno

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:48 AM

We almost bought Miss Amelia, the number 3 roan, right before this show in Santiago, Dominican Republic.  3 yo mare, first show, 2nd place.  $$$ tripled.  I understand that your horse is NOT trained Paso, but thought you might want to see and note a couple of things that might help you.  Note:  legs and feet.  Body is upright, though this rider curves his back some.  Riders heads don't move.  Double reins.  They are using Paso Fino professional saddles for the show.

 

 Turn up your sound and listen to the beats over the boards.

 

 

We crossed trained our horse's for more of a western style easy trail riding.  Took some time but it worked fine.


Edited by Sereno, 30 May 2013 - 05:56 AM.

If you don't see the World differently while riding a horse, then you should not be on one!


#11 Meghan0717

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 07:40 PM

Sereno.... I had wondered if roaning was accepted in this breed. My mare has quite a bit of roaning on one of her hind quarters. Again she is not registered or anything but I believe her to be of pure peruvian blood line. The lady I got her from bought her from a breeder and owns her brother as well. He gated much better than she does but he was ridden much more and he had SO much Termino that he would knock your ankles with his legs if your legs where long enough! 



#12 Augustero

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 11:12 PM

Congrats on your Peruvian!  you'll love the ride.  I own a Tennuvian who is out of a Tennuvian mother and a pure Peruvian Paso father. (Agostero de Oro) . Gus luckily ended up with the termino.  Trust me you'll get a lot of stares if you ride where people have never seen the Peruvian foot action.  It's great.

For what its worth,  I use an old style English hunt seat, and a snaffle bit.  Tried a cutback-no go at least on Gus.. His previous owner used western rigging with no problem.

Gus was trained for mainly leg signals, with very little rein action, & I rarely have to use the crop anymore although he still likes to  "looky lou" when we're on the road.. 

It all depends on  what is comfortable for the horse (#1), you, and what style you want to ride..

 

 

As a previous poster said:  go with slow steady (re) training, be careful on saddle selection, take your time, get to know each other, relax, have fun.. Yes, lots of carrots; molasses horse cookies work well too.



#13 dondie

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 11:20 PM

Congratulations on your new horse! :yay: :yahoo: :yay:
 
I have a Missouri Foxtrotter. Before I bought her I did a couple of years on research while I saved money for my gaited horse fund. I talked with and visited breeders and owners of Peruvian Pasos and Paso Finos since I loved watching them at Expos and some of the people in my horse club own and love them.
The sideways and out swing of the leg is called Termino. The movement starts in the shoulder and then moves down through the leg. Some people prize a horse that has an extended termino. Others prefer less termino.
The extended people will tell you that it ups the Brio, glamor and price of the horse since only the best horses can do the extended version of the gait.
The ones who prefer less termino will tell you that only the junk horses sold to ignorant Americans have the extended termino. That too much termino makes for a rougher gait and the horses break down at an earlier age.
One of the ladies that use to belong to my horse club had two Peruvian geldings. 1 had lots of termino the other didn't. The gelding with extra termino couldn't be ridden on narrow stone trails in the Sierras since his front hooves kept hitting the rock, making him lame. Even wearing Old Mac  buckle on riding boots covered by bell boots he still had lameness issues. He also made sparks with iron shoes and other members were worried about staring fires in summer drought California.  So she bought the second gelding about the same age for mountain rides.
Both horses had controlled Brio..flashy looking yet fully under-control. When her health declined, she kept her first horse as long as she could. He's in his twenties and a pasture pet for another club member. Her other horse went to a new owner in Arizona, so I don't know if he ended up with lameness issues too. So I can't tell you which camp of thought it correct.
As for colors, they come in every color including roans. White on the face and legs is acceptable. I've never seen a registered pinto Peruvian. Don't know if they have the gene.
 
If your mare was started correctly in Clinton Anderson's method.
Standing still, wouldn't be a problem.
Horses have to hustle their hooves and standing still is the reward for good behavior. 
My mare Sienna is thrilled to just stand in one place with or without me on her back.
Whoa is now her favorite word. :rotf:
Walking off without waiting for my cue; results in backing up quickly, rollbacks over her hocks. side-passing, lots of circle turn-backs or serpentine movements at her fast gait.
She's calmer, a willing partner and a joy to ride.
A much better horse than the one I started with. :yay:

Edited by dondie, 30 June 2013 - 11:23 PM.

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#14 Meghan0717

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:26 AM

We are working on the mounting deal. Lots of lunging and then standing still by the mounting block with my sister standing on it. She stood good and still and didn't bolt the last time we tried.... still a lot of work to go though.

 

The rain and Humidity here in Ga has been awful!! Not a lot of work getting done with the horses right now! 



#15 dondie

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 02:55 PM

It's good that she is starting to understand the concept of standing still at the mounting block.

Hopefully, when the weather is better you can expand her lunging to doing roll backs over her hocks while doing lots of turn backs from one direction to another on the lunge line.

Those will engage her mind and keep her attention focused on your leadership compared to going around in lots of circles.

I found a video of Clinton Anderson talking about teaching horses to stand still for mounting.:


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#16 PASOGIRLZ

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 03:13 PM

I'm so happy you decided to take a chance on this mare. Congrats. You will never regret this. Welcome to the wild world of Paso Finos.


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#17 Meghan0717

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 03:19 PM

PasoGirl: I couldn't have done it without you! I know for sure I won't regret it! She is such a sweet thing and I think exactly what I needed right now! 



#18 PASOGIRLZ

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 09:10 AM

Im so glad you feel that way about her. She will steal your heart. Get ready for the horse love affair of your life. And keep us posted!!!


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Learn more about Paso Finos at
www.americanpasofinos.com
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#19 Sereno

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 07:52 PM

It's good that she is starting to understand the concept of standing still at the mounting block.

Hopefully, when the weather is better you can expand her lunging to doing roll backs over her hocks while doing lots of turn backs from one direction to another on the lunge line.

Those will engage her mind and keep her attention focused on your leadership compared to going around in lots of circles.

I found a video of Clinton Anderson talking about teaching horses to stand still for mounting.:

First time I've ever seen this guy.  My grandfather used some of the same training that he talks about....... back in 1959.  I use some of what he taught me and it worked just fine.  Some things I disagree with but after all, Clinton is still a young pup and learning.  LOL


If you don't see the World differently while riding a horse, then you should not be on one!


#20 equestrianbreeches

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 10:19 AM

I must admit the reverse psychology really worked with my little Paso gelding. He figured out that going really fast without being asked was going to get him just what he asked for and then some. His previous owners were admittedly intimidated by his forward nature and that was how I got him. It didn't scare me so much as it annoyed me because if I just wanted to take a leisurely stroll I was constantly having to remind him to stay at the walk. Using the rest is reward mentality really worked with him.  Now he too loves the whoa...:)


 


#21 siseley

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 06:59 PM

I ride with a gal who rides a peruvian. It is the only horse to keep up with us Arabians for more than a couple miles. It is really cute to ride behind her, and watch the "swimming" motion of the front hooves.

 

Here is Leslie on "Talli"

 

mdo8-2010030.jpg

 

 

and here two girls on their Peruvian's on a brisk winter morning ride

saddlebackandsis021.jpg


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