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milkweed and horses! any vets or persons with similiar experience!?


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#1 Serah Rose

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 01:52 PM

My little brothers 2yo colt was found eating milkweed leaves and pods this morning. Upon further investigation we figure this colt has eaten about 2 dozen 3ft and upward sized stalks. I searched the net about milkweeds properties, and found that it is poisonous to horses (but horses dont usually eat it bc of its bitter nasty taste) It said that eaten in large amount, siezures, colic, and death may occur within 1-3 days. We called the vet, and she said we probably have nothing to worry about, but they are going to do some research and see what some other vets say.

Needless to say, about 2 minutes after finding that milkeweed can kill the horse, we went out and pulled all the milkweed from the pasture. The colt just followed alongside and tried to eat out of the wheelbarrow that we were putting all the milkweed in! (we had my little brother stand guard and keep the horses away though!)

So...has anyone ever noticed their horse eating milkweed? Noticed any adverse affects? Any vets out there have an opinion on a course of action to be taken, other than removing the milkweed?

As i said, we have alerted the vet and they are aware of the situation, so please no posts that only say "call your vet" bc we have! lol

Thanks everyone, and i hope to hear some info soon!
-Serah

#2 Serah Rose

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 03:08 PM

heard back from our vet. they did some more research and came up with the same stuff I did...it is poisonous and dangerous. My vet said she had no clue--and that she has milkweed in her own pasture. She also said that it is extremely rare for a horse to take more than one bite, since it is so nasty, but since we have the proof that he has eaten waaay more than one bite, that we are to be watchful of his walking and attitude, and at the first sign of anything, call them up and they will be over to go a stomach pump. Glad they are located 3 miles from me! lol
Since this horse has only been in the pasture for about a week now, I do know he has eaten his 2 dozen stalks in 6 days or less, depending on when he decided to taste and continue eating them! (argh! no such thing as a free horse...lol)

still...if anyone has further advice...i want to hear! thanks!

#3 SusieQ

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 05:34 PM

Waiting until the symptoms show might be too late - the damage may already have been done. After you see symptoms of liver or kidney failure it may be too late. Perhaps you should contact a vet school and find out more. What is the toxin and what organ system is affected? Cornell has a poison plant site, so they might be experts in that area. I wonder if activated charcoal would help bind the poison - or if it would adversely effect the horse on its own. I'd go ahead and pump the stomach, unless that is also considered to be risky for the horse. Better safe than sorry, even if it costs money.

#4 Serah Rose

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 09:02 PM

a full day and a half laster....no signs at all of poisoning...so the vet believes we are in the clear. Since I am leaving tomorrow for a week...i sure hope so!

Its nice to know we got all the milkweed out of the pasture b4 I left though, thats for sure! Who would ever have thought that a horse would just ADORE milkweed!? silly little snort

[Crazy]

#5 Katy Watts

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 10:04 PM

http://www.ivis.org/advances/beasley/cpt2c/chapter_frm.asp

http://www.ivis.org/advances/beasley/cpt2c/chapter_frm.asp
This book by A. Knight is excellant, and a lot of it is online here at IVIS. You can register for free. Just say you're a vet tech.

There are several modes of action and toxins. I know someone who had a horse die from eating milkweed.
Katy
www.safergrass.org

#6 Serah Rose

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 07:51 PM

he liived!! rofl...and no signs of anything...still glad all the milkweed is gone though!!

#7 Hard*2*Beat

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 02:08 PM

Weird, We have Milk Thistle (don't know if it's the same thing but I think it is) and we reccomend feeding it to horses with upset guts. We even have a little patch here at the office to let "sick" horses eat. [Confused]

#8 Serah Rose

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 01:52 PM

My little brothers 2yo colt was found eating milkweed leaves and pods this morning. Upon further investigation we figure this colt has eaten about 2 dozen 3ft and upward sized stalks. I searched the net about milkweeds properties, and found that it is poisonous to horses (but horses dont usually eat it bc of its bitter nasty taste) It said that eaten in large amount, siezures, colic, and death may occur within 1-3 days. We called the vet, and she said we probably have nothing to worry about, but they are going to do some research and see what some other vets say.

Needless to say, about 2 minutes after finding that milkeweed can kill the horse, we went out and pulled all the milkweed from the pasture. The colt just followed alongside and tried to eat out of the wheelbarrow that we were putting all the milkweed in! (we had my little brother stand guard and keep the horses away though!)

So...has anyone ever noticed their horse eating milkweed? Noticed any adverse affects? Any vets out there have an opinion on a course of action to be taken, other than removing the milkweed?

As i said, we have alerted the vet and they are aware of the situation, so please no posts that only say "call your vet" bc we have! lol

Thanks everyone, and i hope to hear some info soon!
-Serah

#9 Serah Rose

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 03:08 PM

heard back from our vet. they did some more research and came up with the same stuff I did...it is poisonous and dangerous. My vet said she had no clue--and that she has milkweed in her own pasture. She also said that it is extremely rare for a horse to take more than one bite, since it is so nasty, but since we have the proof that he has eaten waaay more than one bite, that we are to be watchful of his walking and attitude, and at the first sign of anything, call them up and they will be over to go a stomach pump. Glad they are located 3 miles from me! lol
Since this horse has only been in the pasture for about a week now, I do know he has eaten his 2 dozen stalks in 6 days or less, depending on when he decided to taste and continue eating them! (argh! no such thing as a free horse...lol)

still...if anyone has further advice...i want to hear! thanks!

#10 SusieQ

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 05:34 PM

Waiting until the symptoms show might be too late - the damage may already have been done. After you see symptoms of liver or kidney failure it may be too late. Perhaps you should contact a vet school and find out more. What is the toxin and what organ system is affected? Cornell has a poison plant site, so they might be experts in that area. I wonder if activated charcoal would help bind the poison - or if it would adversely effect the horse on its own. I'd go ahead and pump the stomach, unless that is also considered to be risky for the horse. Better safe than sorry, even if it costs money.

#11 Serah Rose

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 09:02 PM

a full day and a half laster....no signs at all of poisoning...so the vet believes we are in the clear. Since I am leaving tomorrow for a week...i sure hope so!

Its nice to know we got all the milkweed out of the pasture b4 I left though, thats for sure! Who would ever have thought that a horse would just ADORE milkweed!? silly little snort

[Crazy]

#12 Katy Watts

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 10:04 PM

http://www.ivis.org/advances/beasley/cpt2c/chapter_frm.asp

http://www.ivis.org/advances/beasley/cpt2c/chapter_frm.asp
This book by A. Knight is excellant, and a lot of it is online here at IVIS. You can register for free. Just say you're a vet tech.

There are several modes of action and toxins. I know someone who had a horse die from eating milkweed.
Katy
www.safergrass.org

#13 Serah Rose

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 07:51 PM

he liived!! rofl...and no signs of anything...still glad all the milkweed is gone though!!

#14 Hard*2*Beat

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 02:08 PM

Weird, We have Milk Thistle (don't know if it's the same thing but I think it is) and we reccomend feeding it to horses with upset guts. We even have a little patch here at the office to let "sick" horses eat. [Confused]