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How Do You Tell if it's a Stone Bruise?


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#1 PonyHoney

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 05:17 AM

We removed the shoes on one of my horses. Three days later, he is lame. Not three-legged lame, but lame. I always remove his shoes when I stop barrel racing him. I am living in a new place that is rockier and usually muddy but it is very dry now. I was thinking maybe it's a stone bruise? How can I tell? How do I treat it if it is a stone bruise? Thank you.

Debi

#2 GoldDust-n-Jr

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 07:21 AM

Hi Pony,
One way to tell if it is a stone bruise is to have the horse walk on really soft ground and then over hard ground (like concrete). If the horse walks ok on soft ground and then gets real tender footed on concrete, more than likely it's a bruise. A farrier can also use hoof testers to find out where it is exactly. If it is infact a stone bruise, it will take some time to heal and it may abcess. What I would do is soak it in epsom salt solution and keep it in an easy boot or keep the horse on soft ground until it gets better. The only problem is that some horses are real prone to abcess with a bruise. In that case, the pain will get increasingly worse in a short amount of time due to the pressure of the abcess. It that case, keep soaking in warm ebsom salt solution 2x a day for 15 - 20 minutes (or as long as the horse will stand there). I also would buy some icthamol dressing (really nasty tar stuff) and coat the bottom of the hoof and wrap it. This will help draw the abcess towards the bottom of the sole. Once an abcess ruptures, the pressure is almost instantly relieved and the horse feels much better. However, soak the foot for another day or two to make sure all the puss is drained or else it may come back. Hope that helps!!

Good luck! [Big Grin]

[ 09-23-2005, 07:38 AM: Message edited by: GoldDust-n-Jr ]

#3 SusieQ

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 09:38 AM

When my horse had a stone bruise, you could actually see a "bruise" appear on the bottom of his foot after a few days. Always treat a stone bruise like an abscess, because it may become one.

#4 Cactus Rose

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 02:31 PM

when you say "not three legged lame - but lame" can I assume you mean on all four - or at least on each foot that previously had a shoe on it?

Cause if that's the case, I'd say it's probably just because of having the shoes removed.

That alone puts the foot in more direct contact with every bump and stone on the ground possibly making the horse act more sensitive.

* * * *

IMO best way to tell if there's a problem with a particular foot is by lunging (trot) the horse on smooth (un-unrocky) ground.

Any bruising I've had with horses has been on the front end. If you cant quite figure out WHICH foot it is, lunge first one way and then the other. The inside foot will be the one that shows the greatest gimpy-ness.

Treatment may be best left to a farrier. Generally once the offending foot has been identified and pincered to narrow down the location, he will clean the area out with his knife locating/draining the bloody pocket that has occurred.

Keep in mind - a red or pink area on the hoof anywhere - does NOT necessarily mean there is a problem. It can just be pigmentation (particularly with paints and appies).

CR

[ 09-23-2005, 02:39 PM: Message edited by: Cactus Rose ]

#5 PonyHoney

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 10:59 PM

Gold Dust, all my ground is hard right now, because we haven't had rain in a while, which is why I'm thinking it's not an abscess (I was told abscesses are from mud.) But I could walk him on grass--would that work? I have icthammol up the giggy since my horses have been taking turns getting abscesses since I moved here a year ago. Up till now, it's been muddy.

Susie, okay, I will treat it like an abscess anyway. Oh man, I am so tired of them!

Cactus, I say he's not three-legged lame, meaning he's standing on it but I can clearly see he's lame on the right front. He's not dead lame on it and he's not ouchy all over.

I have such a problem handling them when I have to do the icthammol thing because they cross a creek getting back and forth from the pasture and so I have to put a Davis boot on to keep the bandage from getting wet. The last horse who is healing from an abscess that reabscessed, now has sores on the bulbs of his heels that I am trying to heel from the boot! I am just pulling my hair out.

Thanks everyone.
Debi

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 02:16 AM

Just wondering if you're going to end up blaming this on your new farrier? [Roll Eyes]

[ 10-02-2005, 03:23 AM: Message edited by: DOC'S VOODOOCHIC ]

#7 PonyHoney

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 06:15 PM

I'm sorry you're upset Docsvoodoo. I hope you've been following all my posts because you will see that the last thing I wanted to do was blame my farrier when my horses started having problems. I loved my farrier. But after ruling out everything else with my vet, researching, showing pictures of my horses' feet to three farriers (in Iowa, Texas and New Jersey--who all said the same exact thing about what they were seeing), and showing pictures to the people on this board, because the last thing I wanted was to believe that my farrier was not trimming them correctly, I finally had to take my vet's suggestion and try someone else to see if they get better. And they did. Doc is 100% sound for the first time in months. Bullet has lost the all-over soreness that he had, though he is still slightly lame on the foot that has the abscess holes. Harley limped for two days after we took the shoes off and then he was fine. I guess it was a stone bruise after all. Why would I blame a farrier for that? Did I ask that in my post--"could a farrier cause a stone bruise?"

I resisted for months when people were telling me it was my farrier. People yelled at me, "You have to think of your horses!" The last thing I wanted to do was believe it was my farrier.

When I contacted the other farriers for their opinions, I said, "I LIKE this guy. I do not want you to pick apart anything because you think it will make me happy. It won't. I just want your honest opinion." They had no ulterior motives since they are in other states. After I got their opinions, which were all the same, (long toes, no heels, off balance, wrong angle, dumped toe) I suggested to my farrier that he show the same pictures to his teacher where he went to school. I said to him, "maybe your teacher will be able to guide you." I STILL didn't want to fire him! I was STILL willing to work with him. I even had the idea of going together down to the horseshoeing school and having them point out what was wrong and letting my farrier see. I don't think a lot of people would be willing to do that.

My farrier was brand new. It is only common sense that if all of a sudden my horses are walking around like they are on glass for no apparent reason, like they never had before, that I should at least be responsible and QUESTION whether it could be him. Farriers are notorious for causing problems with horses' feet--you have to admit that. In fact, there was a big article about it right in the Roanoke Times last week--they were talking about getting farriers certified. But it took me MONTHS to feel sure that it had something to do with the trimming. And even when I did hire someone else, I still didn't want to believe it....until my horses started walking better. So please don't insinuate that I blame everything on my farrier. My heart is broken that I had to find a new farrier. And I'll miss his wife too.

Debi

#8 PonyHoney

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 05:17 AM

We removed the shoes on one of my horses. Three days later, he is lame. Not three-legged lame, but lame. I always remove his shoes when I stop barrel racing him. I am living in a new place that is rockier and usually muddy but it is very dry now. I was thinking maybe it's a stone bruise? How can I tell? How do I treat it if it is a stone bruise? Thank you.

Debi

#9 GoldDust-n-Jr

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 07:21 AM

Hi Pony,
One way to tell if it is a stone bruise is to have the horse walk on really soft ground and then over hard ground (like concrete). If the horse walks ok on soft ground and then gets real tender footed on concrete, more than likely it's a bruise. A farrier can also use hoof testers to find out where it is exactly. If it is infact a stone bruise, it will take some time to heal and it may abcess. What I would do is soak it in epsom salt solution and keep it in an easy boot or keep the horse on soft ground until it gets better. The only problem is that some horses are real prone to abcess with a bruise. In that case, the pain will get increasingly worse in a short amount of time due to the pressure of the abcess. It that case, keep soaking in warm ebsom salt solution 2x a day for 15 - 20 minutes (or as long as the horse will stand there). I also would buy some icthamol dressing (really nasty tar stuff) and coat the bottom of the hoof and wrap it. This will help draw the abcess towards the bottom of the sole. Once an abcess ruptures, the pressure is almost instantly relieved and the horse feels much better. However, soak the foot for another day or two to make sure all the puss is drained or else it may come back. Hope that helps!!

Good luck! [Big Grin]

[ 09-23-2005, 07:38 AM: Message edited by: GoldDust-n-Jr ]

#10 SusieQ

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 09:38 AM

When my horse had a stone bruise, you could actually see a "bruise" appear on the bottom of his foot after a few days. Always treat a stone bruise like an abscess, because it may become one.

#11 Cactus Rose

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 02:31 PM

when you say "not three legged lame - but lame" can I assume you mean on all four - or at least on each foot that previously had a shoe on it?

Cause if that's the case, I'd say it's probably just because of having the shoes removed.

That alone puts the foot in more direct contact with every bump and stone on the ground possibly making the horse act more sensitive.

* * * *

IMO best way to tell if there's a problem with a particular foot is by lunging (trot) the horse on smooth (un-unrocky) ground.

Any bruising I've had with horses has been on the front end. If you cant quite figure out WHICH foot it is, lunge first one way and then the other. The inside foot will be the one that shows the greatest gimpy-ness.

Treatment may be best left to a farrier. Generally once the offending foot has been identified and pincered to narrow down the location, he will clean the area out with his knife locating/draining the bloody pocket that has occurred.

Keep in mind - a red or pink area on the hoof anywhere - does NOT necessarily mean there is a problem. It can just be pigmentation (particularly with paints and appies).

CR

[ 09-23-2005, 02:39 PM: Message edited by: Cactus Rose ]

#12 PonyHoney

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 10:59 PM

Gold Dust, all my ground is hard right now, because we haven't had rain in a while, which is why I'm thinking it's not an abscess (I was told abscesses are from mud.) But I could walk him on grass--would that work? I have icthammol up the giggy since my horses have been taking turns getting abscesses since I moved here a year ago. Up till now, it's been muddy.

Susie, okay, I will treat it like an abscess anyway. Oh man, I am so tired of them!

Cactus, I say he's not three-legged lame, meaning he's standing on it but I can clearly see he's lame on the right front. He's not dead lame on it and he's not ouchy all over.

I have such a problem handling them when I have to do the icthammol thing because they cross a creek getting back and forth from the pasture and so I have to put a Davis boot on to keep the bandage from getting wet. The last horse who is healing from an abscess that reabscessed, now has sores on the bulbs of his heels that I am trying to heel from the boot! I am just pulling my hair out.

Thanks everyone.
Debi

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 02:16 AM

Just wondering if you're going to end up blaming this on your new farrier? [Roll Eyes]

[ 10-02-2005, 03:23 AM: Message edited by: DOC'S VOODOOCHIC ]

#14 PonyHoney

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 06:15 PM

I'm sorry you're upset Docsvoodoo. I hope you've been following all my posts because you will see that the last thing I wanted to do was blame my farrier when my horses started having problems. I loved my farrier. But after ruling out everything else with my vet, researching, showing pictures of my horses' feet to three farriers (in Iowa, Texas and New Jersey--who all said the same exact thing about what they were seeing), and showing pictures to the people on this board, because the last thing I wanted was to believe that my farrier was not trimming them correctly, I finally had to take my vet's suggestion and try someone else to see if they get better. And they did. Doc is 100% sound for the first time in months. Bullet has lost the all-over soreness that he had, though he is still slightly lame on the foot that has the abscess holes. Harley limped for two days after we took the shoes off and then he was fine. I guess it was a stone bruise after all. Why would I blame a farrier for that? Did I ask that in my post--"could a farrier cause a stone bruise?"

I resisted for months when people were telling me it was my farrier. People yelled at me, "You have to think of your horses!" The last thing I wanted to do was believe it was my farrier.

When I contacted the other farriers for their opinions, I said, "I LIKE this guy. I do not want you to pick apart anything because you think it will make me happy. It won't. I just want your honest opinion." They had no ulterior motives since they are in other states. After I got their opinions, which were all the same, (long toes, no heels, off balance, wrong angle, dumped toe) I suggested to my farrier that he show the same pictures to his teacher where he went to school. I said to him, "maybe your teacher will be able to guide you." I STILL didn't want to fire him! I was STILL willing to work with him. I even had the idea of going together down to the horseshoeing school and having them point out what was wrong and letting my farrier see. I don't think a lot of people would be willing to do that.

My farrier was brand new. It is only common sense that if all of a sudden my horses are walking around like they are on glass for no apparent reason, like they never had before, that I should at least be responsible and QUESTION whether it could be him. Farriers are notorious for causing problems with horses' feet--you have to admit that. In fact, there was a big article about it right in the Roanoke Times last week--they were talking about getting farriers certified. But it took me MONTHS to feel sure that it had something to do with the trimming. And even when I did hire someone else, I still didn't want to believe it....until my horses started walking better. So please don't insinuate that I blame everything on my farrier. My heart is broken that I had to find a new farrier. And I'll miss his wife too.

Debi