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CVM: Fix for pastern subluxation?


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#1 MHJLittlefield

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 05:02 PM

In your opinion... Would this be a surgical fix, or something a chiropractor could manage?

#2 Horseshoe

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 05:56 PM

A little more info would be nice. Front, hind pasterns. Age, pictures.

#3 cvm2002

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 06:24 PM

Guess it would depend on the horse and what its intended use is. Once a subluxer, always a subluxer and pastern arthrodesis (fusion) would be the treatment of choice.

#4 MHJLittlefield

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 08:00 PM

This is a brand new injury (two days) in a 28 year old AQHA mare. She's long retired due to other infirmities of age (DSLD, arthritis, old carpal chip, etc.) Doesn't need to do anything except stand around and look pretty.

She was apparantly cast in her stall, although she was upright (standing) when her owner found her. Radiographs showed left front sublux between P1/P2. She's in a gel cast for the time being.

In your opinion, will she be able to get around without surgery to fuse the joint? Or does she risk further joint damage/further dislocation with simple wandering in the pasture?

Thanks for your help.

[ 01-19-2006, 07:01 PM: Message edited by: MHJLittlefield ]

#5 cvm2002

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 10:35 PM

Gotcha....I would doubt that a mare of that age would be a decent surgical candidate anyhow. We actually had a discussion not too long ago about such problems and one individual suggested a home-made PVC splint that could be placed and removed at will.

If the mare has lost the soft tissue support, the rate of arthritis is going to be substantial, and the joint may actually arthrodese on its own over time. I've seen a couple of very bizarre radiographs where this has happened. Your biggest problem however may be maintaining a healthy OPPOSITE limb.

#6 MHJLittlefield

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:21 PM

Yep... I was thinking about the other leg, too. Thanks for your responses.

#7 sgolshani

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 05:25 PM

Could this be DSLD?

http://www.dsldequine.info/
website for info, care, management, case histories
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DSLD-equine/
group message board for exhange of info, raising awareness
http://www.dsldsearch.com/
new, enter your dsld horse's pedigree here

quote:
Originally posted by MHJLittlefield:
In your opinion... Would this be a surgical fix, or something a chiropractor could manage?



#8 cvm2002

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 06:38 PM

The OP already stated that the mare has DSLD. Which wouldn't involve P1-P2

#9 MHJLittlefield

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 05:02 PM

In your opinion... Would this be a surgical fix, or something a chiropractor could manage?

#10 Horseshoe

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 05:56 PM

A little more info would be nice. Front, hind pasterns. Age, pictures.

#11 cvm2002

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 06:24 PM

Guess it would depend on the horse and what its intended use is. Once a subluxer, always a subluxer and pastern arthrodesis (fusion) would be the treatment of choice.

#12 MHJLittlefield

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 08:00 PM

This is a brand new injury (two days) in a 28 year old AQHA mare. She's long retired due to other infirmities of age (DSLD, arthritis, old carpal chip, etc.) Doesn't need to do anything except stand around and look pretty.

She was apparantly cast in her stall, although she was upright (standing) when her owner found her. Radiographs showed left front sublux between P1/P2. She's in a gel cast for the time being.

In your opinion, will she be able to get around without surgery to fuse the joint? Or does she risk further joint damage/further dislocation with simple wandering in the pasture?

Thanks for your help.

[ 01-19-2006, 07:01 PM: Message edited by: MHJLittlefield ]

#13 cvm2002

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 10:35 PM

Gotcha....I would doubt that a mare of that age would be a decent surgical candidate anyhow. We actually had a discussion not too long ago about such problems and one individual suggested a home-made PVC splint that could be placed and removed at will.

If the mare has lost the soft tissue support, the rate of arthritis is going to be substantial, and the joint may actually arthrodese on its own over time. I've seen a couple of very bizarre radiographs where this has happened. Your biggest problem however may be maintaining a healthy OPPOSITE limb.

#14 MHJLittlefield

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:21 PM

Yep... I was thinking about the other leg, too. Thanks for your responses.

#15 sgolshani

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 05:25 PM

Could this be DSLD?

http://www.dsldequine.info/
website for info, care, management, case histories
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DSLD-equine/
group message board for exhange of info, raising awareness
http://www.dsldsearch.com/
new, enter your dsld horse's pedigree here

quote:
Originally posted by MHJLittlefield:
In your opinion... Would this be a surgical fix, or something a chiropractor could manage?



#16 cvm2002

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 06:38 PM

The OP already stated that the mare has DSLD. Which wouldn't involve P1-P2