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Horse laying down more than usual?


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#1 Dash For Desire

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:01 PM

Well, My gelding has been laying down a bit more than usual. I'm not talking like, every hour. But he used to never really lay down, maybe at night for an hour I'd catch him taking a nap..but now I've been seeing him lay down during the day and the evening's.

I checked his vitals, he doesn't have a temperature. He's not sick, he hasn't had his feed switched. He gets fed alfalfa/grass mix, with some sweet feed and Necessity with Glucosamine and MSM. He's been eating/drinking. He's passing both feces/urine, I've listened to his tummy, his got movement. I even went to check his manure to check if he's passing stones or sand..and its clean. In the 5 years I have owned this horse, he has -never- coliced or tied up on me, and he's not showing any signs of colic. (Kicking, biting at his stomach, not eating, not lethargic)The only thing I can think of..is that he's been by himself for about 2 years. But now he has a barn buddy back there, and that horse is around 20 y/o and he lays down a lot. Could he just have picked up the habit of laying down more often? I know horses pick up habits of other horses..and I know in the wild, when some lay down they have another horse to watch out for predators. I'm not too worried, but my mom (He stays at my moms) brought it to my attention that he's been laying down more often than usual. But he never started doing it till Cloud(the other horse) got back there. Any thoughts?

#2 Lady Te

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:36 PM

My two, take turns at standing gaurd and lying down. one stands graud more then the other. If he is feeling safe now with a partner maybe that is why. But I would keep a eye on him just in case. [Wink]

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:38 PM

This horse at our barn did that for a while. It was kind of weird because everyone thought he was colicing and he wasnt! He didnt have any signs of it (kicking, biting stomach, not eating ect.) and when I would walk him in the arena he was all perky and happy. After a few months he stoped and we never found out what was wrong (or atleast I didnt hear anything.) I dont know what to tell you, but I just wanted you to know that you werent the only one. Good luck!

#4 horse crazy inTX

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:44 PM

When was the last time he was wormed? A horse with worms will sometimes spend more time laying down because of a tummy ache. You could take in a sample to have it checked just to be sure.

[ 01-26-2006, 06:44 PM: Message edited by: horse crazy inTX ]

#5 Cheri Wolfe

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:48 PM

Almost every horse that feels good and is healthy 'shakes' himself when he gets up on his own . (Not always so when you get him up.) he may only shake his head and neck or may shake all over. You will almost NEVER see a horse shake himself when he feels bad.

#6 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 08:13 PM

He probably started this when he felt secure with the other horse. I have a mustang who is always very relaxed. I decided to take on a project pony and I bought an off track TB. The TB was really nutty and flighty at first, but after about a month, he joined the mustang in the daily ritual of basking in the sun by the water bucket EVERY DAY after eating breakfast. They lay down for a few of hours when they do this; occasionally getting up and taking turns sipping out of the water bucket. In fact, any horse that was turned out with my mustang for a while got used to this daily ritual. He's good to turn out neurotic freakazoids with.

#7 440

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 08:39 PM

Laying down excessively, or frequently is a sign of founder, or laminitis. How do his hooves feel? When he moves does he seem lame, or leaned back on the front?

#8 Dash For Desire

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 11:05 PM

HorseCrazy- I just wormed him about two weeks ago actually with SafeGuard, cause the time before we gave him Zimectrin. So I don't think worms are the problem. Edited to add: But I'll definately keep it in mind if anything more occurs.

440: As for his hooves, he just got shoed a couple weeks ago too. His hooves have been awesome, I do frequently check for heat in his hooves and legs, because I do barrel race him and I don't want any injuries or inflammation to go unnoticed. But his hooves have been fine. And when he moves, he moves beautifully. No soreness at all. Last time he came up lame was about a year and a half ago, and that was because he had an abcess on his front left.

As for everyone else. Thank you! I guess it is because he's got a buddy back there, like I said he was by himself for about two years. I've been watching him all day and he seems to just be wandering around like he always does. I'll probably give him some psyllium(SP?) though just incase he's got some sand in his tummy. Thanks again!!

[ 01-26-2006, 10:15 PM: Message edited by: Dash For Desire ]

#9 Andi33

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 11:31 PM

My gelding would almost always lay down out in the pasture with other horses... he was top dog though and the youngsters got to stand guard while he napped... Kind of odd i know...

But then Last summer he got turned into a full blown show horse and is now kept in a stall except for 2 hrs turn out in the morning and at night. He'd never lay down in his stall at first... I got to thinking that maybe the bedding wasn't deep enough so I added some extra and that did the trick. He needed the extra padding! But then I noticed he wouldn't lay down very often... maybe for a bit at night, but that's it. He wasn't the only horse in the barn so I know that wasn't the problem... but he didn't have another horse in the stall next to him. We got a new horse in training and he went in the stall next to him. That horse was goofy though he'd rear up and check over the side walls to make sure his buddies were on either side of him and if one of them was gone and not in sight he'd worry and pace his stall. My gelding took to laying down once or twice during the day too mostly when we opend his window and let the sun in. I think he was just more relaxed having another horse next to him... even if the horse was constantly wiggling and moving around or checking to see if they were there.

Remember too that horses are herd animals. They feel safer in numbers so maybe your guy finally feels safe enough to lay down more!

#10 Dash For Desire

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:01 PM

Well, My gelding has been laying down a bit more than usual. I'm not talking like, every hour. But he used to never really lay down, maybe at night for an hour I'd catch him taking a nap..but now I've been seeing him lay down during the day and the evening's.

I checked his vitals, he doesn't have a temperature. He's not sick, he hasn't had his feed switched. He gets fed alfalfa/grass mix, with some sweet feed and Necessity with Glucosamine and MSM. He's been eating/drinking. He's passing both feces/urine, I've listened to his tummy, his got movement. I even went to check his manure to check if he's passing stones or sand..and its clean. In the 5 years I have owned this horse, he has -never- coliced or tied up on me, and he's not showing any signs of colic. (Kicking, biting at his stomach, not eating, not lethargic)The only thing I can think of..is that he's been by himself for about 2 years. But now he has a barn buddy back there, and that horse is around 20 y/o and he lays down a lot. Could he just have picked up the habit of laying down more often? I know horses pick up habits of other horses..and I know in the wild, when some lay down they have another horse to watch out for predators. I'm not too worried, but my mom (He stays at my moms) brought it to my attention that he's been laying down more often than usual. But he never started doing it till Cloud(the other horse) got back there. Any thoughts?

#11 Lady Te

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:36 PM

My two, take turns at standing gaurd and lying down. one stands graud more then the other. If he is feeling safe now with a partner maybe that is why. But I would keep a eye on him just in case. [Wink]

#12 Guest__*

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:38 PM

This horse at our barn did that for a while. It was kind of weird because everyone thought he was colicing and he wasnt! He didnt have any signs of it (kicking, biting stomach, not eating ect.) and when I would walk him in the arena he was all perky and happy. After a few months he stoped and we never found out what was wrong (or atleast I didnt hear anything.) I dont know what to tell you, but I just wanted you to know that you werent the only one. Good luck!

#13 horse crazy inTX

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:44 PM

When was the last time he was wormed? A horse with worms will sometimes spend more time laying down because of a tummy ache. You could take in a sample to have it checked just to be sure.

[ 01-26-2006, 06:44 PM: Message edited by: horse crazy inTX ]

#14 Cheri Wolfe

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:48 PM

Almost every horse that feels good and is healthy 'shakes' himself when he gets up on his own . (Not always so when you get him up.) he may only shake his head and neck or may shake all over. You will almost NEVER see a horse shake himself when he feels bad.

#15 ..::Felda::..

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 08:13 PM

He probably started this when he felt secure with the other horse. I have a mustang who is always very relaxed. I decided to take on a project pony and I bought an off track TB. The TB was really nutty and flighty at first, but after about a month, he joined the mustang in the daily ritual of basking in the sun by the water bucket EVERY DAY after eating breakfast. They lay down for a few of hours when they do this; occasionally getting up and taking turns sipping out of the water bucket. In fact, any horse that was turned out with my mustang for a while got used to this daily ritual. He's good to turn out neurotic freakazoids with.

#16 440

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 08:39 PM

Laying down excessively, or frequently is a sign of founder, or laminitis. How do his hooves feel? When he moves does he seem lame, or leaned back on the front?

#17 Dash For Desire

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 11:05 PM

HorseCrazy- I just wormed him about two weeks ago actually with SafeGuard, cause the time before we gave him Zimectrin. So I don't think worms are the problem. Edited to add: But I'll definately keep it in mind if anything more occurs.

440: As for his hooves, he just got shoed a couple weeks ago too. His hooves have been awesome, I do frequently check for heat in his hooves and legs, because I do barrel race him and I don't want any injuries or inflammation to go unnoticed. But his hooves have been fine. And when he moves, he moves beautifully. No soreness at all. Last time he came up lame was about a year and a half ago, and that was because he had an abcess on his front left.

As for everyone else. Thank you! I guess it is because he's got a buddy back there, like I said he was by himself for about two years. I've been watching him all day and he seems to just be wandering around like he always does. I'll probably give him some psyllium(SP?) though just incase he's got some sand in his tummy. Thanks again!!

[ 01-26-2006, 10:15 PM: Message edited by: Dash For Desire ]

#18 Andi33

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 11:31 PM

My gelding would almost always lay down out in the pasture with other horses... he was top dog though and the youngsters got to stand guard while he napped... Kind of odd i know...

But then Last summer he got turned into a full blown show horse and is now kept in a stall except for 2 hrs turn out in the morning and at night. He'd never lay down in his stall at first... I got to thinking that maybe the bedding wasn't deep enough so I added some extra and that did the trick. He needed the extra padding! But then I noticed he wouldn't lay down very often... maybe for a bit at night, but that's it. He wasn't the only horse in the barn so I know that wasn't the problem... but he didn't have another horse in the stall next to him. We got a new horse in training and he went in the stall next to him. That horse was goofy though he'd rear up and check over the side walls to make sure his buddies were on either side of him and if one of them was gone and not in sight he'd worry and pace his stall. My gelding took to laying down once or twice during the day too mostly when we opend his window and let the sun in. I think he was just more relaxed having another horse next to him... even if the horse was constantly wiggling and moving around or checking to see if they were there.

Remember too that horses are herd animals. They feel safer in numbers so maybe your guy finally feels safe enough to lay down more!