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Can you give powder skim milk to a horse? And what can you do to help put on weight ?


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#1 Kate 05501

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 11:42 PM

Dakota birthday is July 1. She will be two. My horse had lose wait this winter. I go see my horse three times a week. I feed her Patriot Horse Feed (Masterfeeds). I don't drive. I can't put a blanket on my horse because of the winters I get in Ontario and because it might get caught on Something. Dakota lose wait on her back and hips.

Dakota is getting better. My question to you all is should I feed her something to help put the weight back on and what the name of it? My next question is did you ever give your hores skim milk? If there any other question you want to ask me go for it... My last question is how do you tell how big you horse is going to be? Thank you for your time. I'm looking for your reply.

Kate 05501 and the gang
[Yay]

#2 mayday95

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 12:59 AM

I personally wouldn't give mine any dairy products, and I have always used beet pulp to safely put weight on a horse.

Do a search for beet pulp on here and you will find a ton of info!

#3 giddeyup

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 09:19 AM

someone here gave me the advice of trying corn oil.....start with just a little 1/3 cup then co up to a cup with their grain. It worked for me. [Yay]

#4 barrelracer111

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 09:49 AM

Man is the only mammel that continues to drink milk past the weaning stage so no, I would not feed powdered skim milk for weight gain.

Vegetable or corn oil would be one option as horses need the added fat. Beet pulp or shreds would be a much safer option than powdered milk.

*edited to correct my bad spelling from lack of coffee early this morning!!!!!!!!!!! [Crazy]

[ 02-04-2006, 03:32 PM: Message edited by: barrelracer111 ]

#5 fotie

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 10:53 AM

I wouldn't give a horse cow milk because lactose is best absorbed by cows since cows make that milk. I would look at the fat content on the label of your grain. Also since your horse is young, take a look at grains specially balanced for a horse of that age. Pennfields (and I am sure others as well) makes a Broodmare and Yearlings grain. I use it and have liked the results. I give accel on top of that. Buy a food scale and weigh your grain according to the label. If your horse needs additional weight corn,soy,or rice bran oil are good additives as well as beet pulp. Make sure you soak your beet pulp (contrary to recent theory)if you buy it as a seperate additive. I just read a distrubing article in Horse News in NJ about a woman who fed it as an additive on top of her regular grain and she had 2 horses operated on from choke caused by beet pulp. (I use the Broodmare and Yearling without corn.) After talking to Dr. Sara Ralston of Rutgers (she teaches nutrition to vets) she suggested to get a grain w/o it b/c corn spikes the sugar level after digestion, and causes highs and lows which can be hard on a baby metabolically speaking.

#6 Remy

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 05:01 PM

I totally agree with the addition of corn oil to the feed. I use Mazola Corn Oil and started with 1/2 cup and increased it to 1 cup. I also add a supplement called Probios, (a probiotic). This helps the horse derive maximum benefit from the feed provided. This has worked wonders in both my horses and my two rescue Great Danes. The amount given a horse (once a day) is 5 mgms which is a very, very small amount and so the product lasts a long time. The above two additions to their feed really helped both my horses put on weight and their coats now shine and my bay has dapples - a good indication of good health. Hope this helps.

#7 mjht76

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 11:26 PM

I have used something called calf mana for horses has a high percentage of fat and is safe for them. I have used that to put weight on a starved horse I bought from auction. I am using a product called Healthy Coat right now on my thin TB mare it is working well.

#8 MiamiSuzanne

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 12:59 AM

My horse is doing well with rice bran added to his grain. The vet suggested it. I add water to it, mix it up and add it to his grain.

#9 Halt@X...

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 01:02 AM

Ditto to corn oil. My horse lost a good 200 lbs when we were in a bad situation with our old barn. We put him on Nutrena Safe Choice and he has loads of hay to eat. We also give him a cup of corn oil each night with his grain. It has worked wonders. Up her hay and try adding corn oil. A horse can't have too much hay, so just let her eat all she wants. Alot of horses won't like the corn oil at first, but eventually then grow fond of it. Nick shunned it when we first started but now he just laps it up lol. It really does help. Nick has gained all his weight back since we started this regimen in October.

Good luck!

[ 02-05-2006, 12:04 AM: Message edited by: Halt@X... ]

#10 ej

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 11:31 AM

Re-check your deworming schedule. Horses 2 and under should be dewormed every 60 days.
Information on deworming young horses:
www.thehorse.com/printarticle.aspx?ID=1621
Next-
Increase hay intake. Hay needs increase during the winter months. Horses have to work harder to maintain their internal body temperture when the temps drop. High fiber feeds(hays) are digested in part of the large hindgut by baterial fermentation and since cellulose and other fiber components are tough to break down, its a process that generates lots of wamth. Grains, which are digested in the small intestine, is easier to break down, so it creates less heat.
In order to keep the horse from losing weight once the temps reach the freezing mark, you will need to provide about 15-20% more feed per day for every 10 degree drop in the temperature below 30 degrees. Two flakes more per feeding.
You can feed beet pulp with added fats such as corn/veg/soy oils. Beet pulp is safe to feed as much as you want since it is a fiber and not a grain. It is good food for putting weight on. Fat oils can be up to 10% of the horses daily diet. Anything new being added to the diet should be done slowly and gradually. With the beet pulp start out at 1/4-1/2 cup a day and work up to as much as you want(you can feed up to a gallon or more a day)Adding oil, you might start out at 1/4 cup and work up to a cup a day. Do this in a two to three week period. It takes that long for the gut flora to adapt to change. Sudden changes can cause health problems, colic, founder, diarrhea, ect....
Informtaion on feeding beet pulp:
www.thehorse.com/printarticle.aspx?ID=314
Information on feeding fats:
www.thehorse.com/printarticle.aspx?ID=3895

#11 Kate 05501

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 11:42 PM

Dakota birthday is July 1. She will be two. My horse had lose wait this winter. I go see my horse three times a week. I feed her Patriot Horse Feed (Masterfeeds). I don't drive. I can't put a blanket on my horse because of the winters I get in Ontario and because it might get caught on Something. Dakota lose wait on her back and hips.

Dakota is getting better. My question to you all is should I feed her something to help put the weight back on and what the name of it? My next question is did you ever give your hores skim milk? If there any other question you want to ask me go for it... My last question is how do you tell how big you horse is going to be? Thank you for your time. I'm looking for your reply.

Kate 05501 and the gang
[Yay]

#12 mayday95

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 12:59 AM

I personally wouldn't give mine any dairy products, and I have always used beet pulp to safely put weight on a horse.

Do a search for beet pulp on here and you will find a ton of info!

#13 giddeyup

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 09:19 AM

someone here gave me the advice of trying corn oil.....start with just a little 1/3 cup then co up to a cup with their grain. It worked for me. [Yay]

#14 barrelracer111

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 09:49 AM

Man is the only mammel that continues to drink milk past the weaning stage so no, I would not feed powdered skim milk for weight gain.

Vegetable or corn oil would be one option as horses need the added fat. Beet pulp or shreds would be a much safer option than powdered milk.

*edited to correct my bad spelling from lack of coffee early this morning!!!!!!!!!!! [Crazy]

[ 02-04-2006, 03:32 PM: Message edited by: barrelracer111 ]

#15 fotie

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 10:53 AM

I wouldn't give a horse cow milk because lactose is best absorbed by cows since cows make that milk. I would look at the fat content on the label of your grain. Also since your horse is young, take a look at grains specially balanced for a horse of that age. Pennfields (and I am sure others as well) makes a Broodmare and Yearlings grain. I use it and have liked the results. I give accel on top of that. Buy a food scale and weigh your grain according to the label. If your horse needs additional weight corn,soy,or rice bran oil are good additives as well as beet pulp. Make sure you soak your beet pulp (contrary to recent theory)if you buy it as a seperate additive. I just read a distrubing article in Horse News in NJ about a woman who fed it as an additive on top of her regular grain and she had 2 horses operated on from choke caused by beet pulp. (I use the Broodmare and Yearling without corn.) After talking to Dr. Sara Ralston of Rutgers (she teaches nutrition to vets) she suggested to get a grain w/o it b/c corn spikes the sugar level after digestion, and causes highs and lows which can be hard on a baby metabolically speaking.

#16 Remy

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 05:01 PM

I totally agree with the addition of corn oil to the feed. I use Mazola Corn Oil and started with 1/2 cup and increased it to 1 cup. I also add a supplement called Probios, (a probiotic). This helps the horse derive maximum benefit from the feed provided. This has worked wonders in both my horses and my two rescue Great Danes. The amount given a horse (once a day) is 5 mgms which is a very, very small amount and so the product lasts a long time. The above two additions to their feed really helped both my horses put on weight and their coats now shine and my bay has dapples - a good indication of good health. Hope this helps.

#17 mjht76

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 11:26 PM

I have used something called calf mana for horses has a high percentage of fat and is safe for them. I have used that to put weight on a starved horse I bought from auction. I am using a product called Healthy Coat right now on my thin TB mare it is working well.

#18 MiamiSuzanne

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 12:59 AM

My horse is doing well with rice bran added to his grain. The vet suggested it. I add water to it, mix it up and add it to his grain.

#19 Halt@X...

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 01:02 AM

Ditto to corn oil. My horse lost a good 200 lbs when we were in a bad situation with our old barn. We put him on Nutrena Safe Choice and he has loads of hay to eat. We also give him a cup of corn oil each night with his grain. It has worked wonders. Up her hay and try adding corn oil. A horse can't have too much hay, so just let her eat all she wants. Alot of horses won't like the corn oil at first, but eventually then grow fond of it. Nick shunned it when we first started but now he just laps it up lol. It really does help. Nick has gained all his weight back since we started this regimen in October.

Good luck!

[ 02-05-2006, 12:04 AM: Message edited by: Halt@X... ]

#20 ej

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 11:31 AM

Re-check your deworming schedule. Horses 2 and under should be dewormed every 60 days.
Information on deworming young horses:
www.thehorse.com/printarticle.aspx?ID=1621
Next-
Increase hay intake. Hay needs increase during the winter months. Horses have to work harder to maintain their internal body temperture when the temps drop. High fiber feeds(hays) are digested in part of the large hindgut by baterial fermentation and since cellulose and other fiber components are tough to break down, its a process that generates lots of wamth. Grains, which are digested in the small intestine, is easier to break down, so it creates less heat.
In order to keep the horse from losing weight once the temps reach the freezing mark, you will need to provide about 15-20% more feed per day for every 10 degree drop in the temperature below 30 degrees. Two flakes more per feeding.
You can feed beet pulp with added fats such as corn/veg/soy oils. Beet pulp is safe to feed as much as you want since it is a fiber and not a grain. It is good food for putting weight on. Fat oils can be up to 10% of the horses daily diet. Anything new being added to the diet should be done slowly and gradually. With the beet pulp start out at 1/4-1/2 cup a day and work up to as much as you want(you can feed up to a gallon or more a day)Adding oil, you might start out at 1/4 cup and work up to a cup a day. Do this in a two to three week period. It takes that long for the gut flora to adapt to change. Sudden changes can cause health problems, colic, founder, diarrhea, ect....
Informtaion on feeding beet pulp:
www.thehorse.com/printarticle.aspx?ID=314
Information on feeding fats:
www.thehorse.com/printarticle.aspx?ID=3895