Quantcast

Jump to content

Photo

muddy paddock help


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 moonliteraver

moonliteraver

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 332 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 21 February 2006 - 10:49 PM

Hello. I am having a problem with mud. Well, right now it's frozen, but once it warms up again, it will be muddy.

I was wondering if anyone has used wood chips in their paddocks to control the mud.

My uncle is a tree trimmer and I can get all the woodchips that I want. BUT he cuts all kinds of trees. I know that cherry, black walnut, and red maples are poisonous to horses if eaten, but is it okay to have them walk on the woodchips of those trees?

Thank you.

Dawn

#2 cvm2002

cvm2002

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,988 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Centralia, WA USA

Posted 21 February 2006 - 11:23 PM

Black walnut shavings ARE the toxic part. You'll induce laminitis if you use them.

Personally, there isn't much you can do while there's actually mud present. Adding stuff--shavings, manure, sand--may help initially, but you'll end up back at square one as the additives settle out and degrade over time.

#3 RioTollerAgain

RioTollerAgain

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,759 posts
  • Location:Virginia

Posted 22 February 2006 - 08:31 AM

What CVM said about the shavings. Do NOT use Black Walnut shavings anywhere .... stalls, paddocks, etc.

About the mud ... first, just keep dealing with it for the time being. Then, when it has warmed up a bit and you have a dry spell and the mud is *mostly* dry, then order a truckload (or more, depending on the size of your paddock and the number of paddocks) of blue stone. It's a crushed, sand-like consistancy stone dust. Put a good two inches down (yes, that's a lot of stone dust,) and tamp it down a bit. It will make a huge difference. Make sure you muck out the manure regularly after you do this, or you are wasting your time and money.

#4 SmokenMirrors

SmokenMirrors

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 208 posts
  • Location:Virginia

Posted 22 February 2006 - 10:06 AM

I use my shavings only where I have a path from the gate to the barn and at the back door. It does firm the ground up, it isn't so nasty and it seems to hold the ground a lot better footing wise. While it may eventually decompose, I think it will stay long enough to supply better footing, bind the danged mug with the shavings till we get some better weather.

#5 G&K'Smom

G&K'Smom

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,278 posts
  • Location:Canada

Posted 22 February 2006 - 04:21 PM

As Rio said, but I would add that it's best to get a tractor in and scrap the surface down until you get to hard pack. Then lay down the crusher rock or whatever you are going to use. If you take it down to hard pack whatever you use will last lots longer.

We live in Western Canada, it's soggy 9 months of the year, we've learned the hard way......

#6 moonliteraver

moonliteraver

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 332 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 23 February 2006 - 12:33 AM

Thanks everyone.

We do have a tractor that we clean up the mud and manure in the spring. During the spring, summer, and fall I keep the manure cleaned up but winter just seems to be a problem because of snowy cold weather then warm weather that melts the snow, which makes everything muddy.

So I will do that and buy some stone to fill in.

Dawn

#7 moonliteraver

moonliteraver

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 332 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 21 February 2006 - 10:49 PM

Hello. I am having a problem with mud. Well, right now it's frozen, but once it warms up again, it will be muddy.

I was wondering if anyone has used wood chips in their paddocks to control the mud.

My uncle is a tree trimmer and I can get all the woodchips that I want. BUT he cuts all kinds of trees. I know that cherry, black walnut, and red maples are poisonous to horses if eaten, but is it okay to have them walk on the woodchips of those trees?

Thank you.

Dawn

#8 cvm2002

cvm2002

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,988 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Centralia, WA USA

Posted 21 February 2006 - 11:23 PM

Black walnut shavings ARE the toxic part. You'll induce laminitis if you use them.

Personally, there isn't much you can do while there's actually mud present. Adding stuff--shavings, manure, sand--may help initially, but you'll end up back at square one as the additives settle out and degrade over time.

#9 RioTollerAgain

RioTollerAgain

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,759 posts
  • Location:Virginia

Posted 22 February 2006 - 08:31 AM

What CVM said about the shavings. Do NOT use Black Walnut shavings anywhere .... stalls, paddocks, etc.

About the mud ... first, just keep dealing with it for the time being. Then, when it has warmed up a bit and you have a dry spell and the mud is *mostly* dry, then order a truckload (or more, depending on the size of your paddock and the number of paddocks) of blue stone. It's a crushed, sand-like consistancy stone dust. Put a good two inches down (yes, that's a lot of stone dust,) and tamp it down a bit. It will make a huge difference. Make sure you muck out the manure regularly after you do this, or you are wasting your time and money.

#10 SmokenMirrors

SmokenMirrors

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 208 posts
  • Location:Virginia

Posted 22 February 2006 - 10:06 AM

I use my shavings only where I have a path from the gate to the barn and at the back door. It does firm the ground up, it isn't so nasty and it seems to hold the ground a lot better footing wise. While it may eventually decompose, I think it will stay long enough to supply better footing, bind the danged mug with the shavings till we get some better weather.

#11 G&K'Smom

G&K'Smom

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,278 posts
  • Location:Canada

Posted 22 February 2006 - 04:21 PM

As Rio said, but I would add that it's best to get a tractor in and scrap the surface down until you get to hard pack. Then lay down the crusher rock or whatever you are going to use. If you take it down to hard pack whatever you use will last lots longer.

We live in Western Canada, it's soggy 9 months of the year, we've learned the hard way......

#12 moonliteraver

moonliteraver

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 332 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 23 February 2006 - 12:33 AM

Thanks everyone.

We do have a tractor that we clean up the mud and manure in the spring. During the spring, summer, and fall I keep the manure cleaned up but winter just seems to be a problem because of snowy cold weather then warm weather that melts the snow, which makes everything muddy.

So I will do that and buy some stone to fill in.

Dawn