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#1 colt starter

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 11:37 AM

Does anyone know if you can feed horses raw soy beans. We were hoping to mix some into the horses feed to help stretch it out.

#2 Cheri Wolfe

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 02:04 PM

Soybeans need to be processed to be digested by a horse. We use extruded whole soybeans as a protein and fat supplement for growing horses and to putting weight on thin horses. It is very effective. It will make a saddle horse think he is a race horse.

I have always been told that raw soybeans and soybean hay (with the pods still on it) have nitrate compounts that horses have a difficult time breaking down. The nitrate compounds act much ,like urea, a non-protein nitrogen compound that cattle can digest and turn into protein but horses cannot.

It is one of the hays we have stayed completely away from. Raw soybeans could be even more toxic as they have the greatest amount of nitrate in them. They would also be very 'hot' to feed. Very high in protein, fat and TDN.

#3 qheventer

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 08:45 PM

Soy Meal

They have some good info on levels in feedstuffs.

We feed soybean meal in with our feed for protein as well.

We mix our own and it's basically oats & barley (I have a couple on a small bit of crack corn) and flax seed, non-molassas beet pulp and Triple Crown Vitamin/minerals.

#4 Cheri Wolfe

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 11:11 PM

Soybean meal has been processed to get the oil out. It is very feedable although we prefer the soybean meal that has all of the fat still in it. It has also been processed through an extruder and comes out looking like little yellow crunchy nuggets.

I think the poster is talking about raw soybeans and they are not good feed for horses. The nitrogen compounds in them can be toxic to horses. I believe the substance in raw beans that can be harmful is urase, a compound very similar to urea. Cattle have no problem with it; Only horses and hogs should not be fed raw soybeans.

#5 EddieNMe

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 10:19 AM

I use roasted soy beans or a soy bean meal to add protein to my horses diet. It works awesome and really puts the weight on a thin horse. If your just trying to stretch your feed though Beet pulp may be the way to go instead and it's cheaper to use with about the same results and less chance of founder. You have to be very careful when starting your horses on soybeans.

#6 qheventer

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 08:25 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Cheri Wolfe:
Soybean meal has been processed to get the oil out. It is very feedable although we prefer the soybean meal that has all of the fat still in it. It has also been processed through an extruder and comes out looking like little yellow crunchy nuggets.

I think the poster is talking about raw soybeans and they are not good feed for horses. The nitrogen compounds in them can be toxic to horses. I believe the substance in raw beans that can be harmful is urase, a compound very similar to urea. Cattle have no problem with it; Only horses and hogs should not be fed raw soybeans.

I don't have a feed tag handy on the soybean meal that we feed. It looks like grape nuts cereal as far as the consistency.

Is the kind with the fat still in it more oily? Are there any other differences? I'd like to feed the kind with the oil too if I could get it and it not be too expensive. We have a very tough time getting stuff here. I have to special order the soy meal that we're feeding now.

#7 Cheri Wolfe

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 09:36 PM

The kind that we get with the fat left in is called 'extruded whole soybeans'. It runs 29% protein and 18 - 19% fat. It is a yellow 'crunchy' nugget, kinda like the Grapenuts you mentioned.

It is so oily that within a day or two of sacking it, the sacks are dark brown and completely soaked in oil. You can't pick up a sack without getting oil all over your clothes. It has a good shelf life in cool or cold weather. In the hot summers months, it can get rancid in 2 or 3 weeks. They eat it good either way.

We are lucky. There is a feed company with a little extruder near us. The extruded soybeans only costs $8.00 for a 50# sack. We just love the stuff.

#8 Yellowpaint

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 09:41 AM

I have a soy bean product for weight on my site. You can read about it.

#9 ej

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 05:10 PM

Soy oil is great for putting weight on a thin or hard to keep horse. Extruded soybeans, another high fat product, are good for young growing horses because they are also a good protein source. They're not as appropriate, for that same reason, for mature animals. You can add extra fat calories in the form of flax, whole roast soy, black sunflower seeds, or rice bran.
A soybean meal will contain a higher level of protein. Correct feeding is the art and science of blending various ingredients to produce a balance. It is best to feed soybeans that are cooked/processed, it is easier to digest.

#10 colt starter

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 11:37 AM

Does anyone know if you can feed horses raw soy beans. We were hoping to mix some into the horses feed to help stretch it out.

#11 Cheri Wolfe

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 02:04 PM

Soybeans need to be processed to be digested by a horse. We use extruded whole soybeans as a protein and fat supplement for growing horses and to putting weight on thin horses. It is very effective. It will make a saddle horse think he is a race horse.

I have always been told that raw soybeans and soybean hay (with the pods still on it) have nitrate compounts that horses have a difficult time breaking down. The nitrate compounds act much ,like urea, a non-protein nitrogen compound that cattle can digest and turn into protein but horses cannot.

It is one of the hays we have stayed completely away from. Raw soybeans could be even more toxic as they have the greatest amount of nitrate in them. They would also be very 'hot' to feed. Very high in protein, fat and TDN.

#12 qheventer

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 08:45 PM

Soy Meal

They have some good info on levels in feedstuffs.

We feed soybean meal in with our feed for protein as well.

We mix our own and it's basically oats & barley (I have a couple on a small bit of crack corn) and flax seed, non-molassas beet pulp and Triple Crown Vitamin/minerals.

#13 Cheri Wolfe

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 11:11 PM

Soybean meal has been processed to get the oil out. It is very feedable although we prefer the soybean meal that has all of the fat still in it. It has also been processed through an extruder and comes out looking like little yellow crunchy nuggets.

I think the poster is talking about raw soybeans and they are not good feed for horses. The nitrogen compounds in them can be toxic to horses. I believe the substance in raw beans that can be harmful is urase, a compound very similar to urea. Cattle have no problem with it; Only horses and hogs should not be fed raw soybeans.

#14 EddieNMe

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 10:19 AM

I use roasted soy beans or a soy bean meal to add protein to my horses diet. It works awesome and really puts the weight on a thin horse. If your just trying to stretch your feed though Beet pulp may be the way to go instead and it's cheaper to use with about the same results and less chance of founder. You have to be very careful when starting your horses on soybeans.

#15 qheventer

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 08:25 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Cheri Wolfe:
Soybean meal has been processed to get the oil out. It is very feedable although we prefer the soybean meal that has all of the fat still in it. It has also been processed through an extruder and comes out looking like little yellow crunchy nuggets.

I think the poster is talking about raw soybeans and they are not good feed for horses. The nitrogen compounds in them can be toxic to horses. I believe the substance in raw beans that can be harmful is urase, a compound very similar to urea. Cattle have no problem with it; Only horses and hogs should not be fed raw soybeans.

I don't have a feed tag handy on the soybean meal that we feed. It looks like grape nuts cereal as far as the consistency.

Is the kind with the fat still in it more oily? Are there any other differences? I'd like to feed the kind with the oil too if I could get it and it not be too expensive. We have a very tough time getting stuff here. I have to special order the soy meal that we're feeding now.

#16 Cheri Wolfe

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 09:36 PM

The kind that we get with the fat left in is called 'extruded whole soybeans'. It runs 29% protein and 18 - 19% fat. It is a yellow 'crunchy' nugget, kinda like the Grapenuts you mentioned.

It is so oily that within a day or two of sacking it, the sacks are dark brown and completely soaked in oil. You can't pick up a sack without getting oil all over your clothes. It has a good shelf life in cool or cold weather. In the hot summers months, it can get rancid in 2 or 3 weeks. They eat it good either way.

We are lucky. There is a feed company with a little extruder near us. The extruded soybeans only costs $8.00 for a 50# sack. We just love the stuff.

#17 Yellowpaint

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 09:41 AM

I have a soy bean product for weight on my site. You can read about it.

#18 ej

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 05:10 PM

Soy oil is great for putting weight on a thin or hard to keep horse. Extruded soybeans, another high fat product, are good for young growing horses because they are also a good protein source. They're not as appropriate, for that same reason, for mature animals. You can add extra fat calories in the form of flax, whole roast soy, black sunflower seeds, or rice bran.
A soybean meal will contain a higher level of protein. Correct feeding is the art and science of blending various ingredients to produce a balance. It is best to feed soybeans that are cooked/processed, it is easier to digest.