missyclare

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Everything posted by missyclare

  1. What A Difference! What Next?

    This the foot I would produce this trim. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14450594677" title="TRIM by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3873/14450594677_4f7ae08f1c_o.jpg" width="900" height="675" alt="TRIM"></a>
  2. What A Difference! What Next?

    You didn't screw up anything. Give yourself a pat on the back! I mean it! Take a sec and smile at yourself. The LF still has balance issues, but the sole is getting there to guide you, just follow it in the meantime. The outside of this foot is higher than the inside, the heel balance and the bar on that side. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14449525648" title="14639696753_61fab24e00_z by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5554/14449525648_98874766b2_o.jpg" width="640" height="480" alt="14639696753_61fab24e00_z"></a> <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14613133546" title="14619747345_5da7e2414b_z4444 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5488/14613133546_8cc0f21a80_o.jpg" width="640" height="480" alt="14619747345_5da7e2414b_z4444"></a> When you know which direction the bars are splatting, know that that force is carrying on right to the wall, making the wall flare....pushing everything outward. The extreme of this force is breaking out at the quarters, flaring or cracking out the whole heel and at the very least, messing with the medial/lateral balance of the foot. She is leaning heavily on the inside, leaving the outside to grow and splat. In other words,she is leaning away from the pain of the flare from the outside, leaving the outside to grow taller from lack of use. Just get the bars down, heels balanced and follow the sole...its starting to tell you the truth on the matter. Look on the left ramp where it ends. See that black dot. This is a perfect example of the punch of a high, jamming bar going into the corium right where the support of the ramp ends. This is how abscesses begin. Be a bit more braver on the heights of those bar ramps and meticulous on the heel balance.
  3. What A Difference! What Next?

    <p>They are looking good! Keep working on the bars and watch your heel balance. I would be beveling right back to the heels, especially on the hinds. Just taking the outside rim of wall away will help to stop the flaring. It's getting the bars down that's really going to help. Soon you'll only have to bevel the quarters on the hinds. <p> </p> <p>RR</p> <p><a href="<a data-ipb="nomediaparse" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14445866540">https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14445866540</a>" title="Left Rear 1 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="<a data-ipb="nomediaparse" href="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3858/14445866540_0e2bef29a8_o.jpg">https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3858/14445866540_0e2bef29a8_o.jpg</a>" width="494" height="368" alt="Left Rear 1"></a></p> <p><a href="<a data-ipb="nomediaparse" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14632519125">https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14632519125</a>" title="Left Rear by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="<a data-ipb="nomediaparse" href="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3867/14632519125_97c38fe149_o.jpg">https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3867/14632519125_97c38fe149_o.jpg</a>" width="474" height="388" alt="Left Rear"></a></p> <p> </p> <p><a href="<a data-ipb="nomediaparse" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14446157877">https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14446157877</a>" title="14619187912_7b09ccbbc1_z by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="<a data-ipb="nomediaparse" href="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2897/14446157877_0f979fcba8_o.jpg">https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2897/14446157877_0f979fcba8_o.jpg</a>" width="800" height="761" alt="14619187912_7b09ccbbc1_z"></a></p> <p>Compare this one with the original, so you can see better what's under those lines. The zig zag is to the area affected. The blue dots, just take the bumps out. When you get into the red dots, scrape the bar off the sole, right over to where the ramp is supposed to be (white). If you stay level from the blue dots, on into the red dots to the bar, the bar ramp should be standing clear as a bell when you get there. Then lower the ramp to run straight up to meet the heels dead on...no bumping up...straight. Think of the bar like a blanket on the sole. I would be peeling it back like a potato until I reached the ramp. The rest of the arrows, I'm just following along, leveling out the bumps. See the black lines indicating a scraping back of bar that is overhanging the groove. Clear the groove of bar. Where bar comes in close to the frog, in front of the ramp, put a small 45 bevel on the edge to bring it back and allow the frog to breathe. The goal is to be able to see that groove from stem to stern in the end. Her hooves are really shaping up and the gravel sure is helping. Nice concavity coming as well. Where it goes flat, just before reaching the wall, that's your remaining thin sole. When that reaches the wall, you have arrived. Doing a great job!
  4. How To Keep A Tail Black

    I buy it straight, without the added iron. Poly copper and poly zinc that you can get from Uckele. But I have a hay test analyzed and know how many mgs. I need to balance with the hay and a gram scale to measure it. Otherwise, California Trace is excellent and low in iron. If you look at any analysis label and the iron is not on there, they are hiding it and figure what you don't know won't hurt you. You have every right to call them and ask them what the iron content is. (unless its a proprietary formula, which means they don't have to tell you anything they put in it.) If you see that they are touting low iron loudly, grab it. The problem is the iron. It's in everything and 10x more bioavailable in water, so your horse is getting lots. There's enough in his hay alone. The trick is not to add any more. If you add store bought, you can up the daily intake of iron a lot. Iron plugs up the intake spots and forces copper and zinc to float by unmetabolized. There's the copper/zinc deficiency happening right there. Balance.......Iron:Copper:Zinc:Manganese...4:1:3:3. (iron is 4x higher than copper and zinc and manganese are both 3x higher than copper. Compare the numbers on the labels instead, because balance equalizes the metabolic playing field and sees them delivered. Other than Cal. Trace, I'd check out Uckele for balance in minerals. Dr. Kellon is on board there. Hope this helps.
  5. How To Keep A Tail Black

    Trace minerals. Copper and zinc with low iron. I turned a horse from mousey brown to jet black in the summer sun in 3 months. It's a copper deficiency that has already done the damage, then allows the sun to bleach it out. Not only that, but it gives the horse the color he was meant to have. I've seen dusty looking browns turn into brilliant palominos as the concept was applied during my nutrition class. Some pretty spectacular results. Copper and zinc are very important for hoof health in multiple ways as well. Good luck with the cosmetic stuff to get through the shows, but if you eliminate the nutritional deficiency, you'll never need the cosmetic stuff again. If you have a fading out around the eyes, chest, back of cannons, stifle, belly, ends of mane, or other places, this will all be corrected. Deep color with dapples. I don't feed sunflower seeds to my working horses. Its an inflammatory. I feed flax, which is an inflammatory. Except for my old girl, who gets a bit to keep her alarm system active.
  6. Hoof Hardener

    Raised a question on my own. Has anyone ever evented a horse in boots??? If they are successful on a rocky trail for an endurance horse, why not? This would be good, well fitted protection while in action kind of boot. Around the barn, therapeutic boots that accommodate pads, so that homework could be done at home. It's going to take time for the growth to get that sole thick again. A couple of months anyway. In the meantime, it is imperative that the bone be protected/cushioned. Why? Not only is the ground jamming up on thinner/flatter/lower sole, but the much bigger factor is the horse's descending weight from the inside on that thin sole. With every step, the bone comes down on it, causing inflammation that eats into bone. (this is where the snub nosed shape in damaged P3 noses happens, the bone is being eaten from the bottom, eventually biting the whole nose back) If the sole is thin, bone low, or down on its nose, its already down on the inside of thin sole before he even takes a step. Because unlike most all other bones in the body, P3 is surrounded by a corium. It won't repair. The damage is permanent. When you consider the pain involved with laminitis and that's just the white line, you can imagine that if the corium inflamed inside a hard wall, it would kill a horse, so Mother Nature does not allow. (we're talking about a 1" halo area around the apex, the heart of the corium, the absolute bottom of the bowl of concavity) If you put a ruler across the hoof 9-3 and measure down from there to the bottom of the groove at the apex and get 1/2" or less, the bone needs protection and support from below. With proper nutrition, trim, movement, boots, gravel, development without setback, I imagine the thicker sole would begin to shine with the concavity in 2 months....depends. This is so you understand the problem with thin sole and where it needs help. As to doing such a rigorous exercise, promote concavity, protect the hoof to the millionth degree, get confident/pain free performance from the horse vs. descending weight??? The only answer is transition if its going to be for the horse. Time and homework done. No matter what method you use to protect the hoof, the trim being balanced is the most important. Thrush care as well. A darn good trimmer and a good balanced trim, cushioned protection and movement, with you astride and at home on his own time. Good nutrition to feed those hooves as well. I'm not a fan of these hoof hardeners. Formalin, embalming fluid, meant for dead tissue, not live tissue. It melts down the sole tubules and hardens it into a hard laminate coating. What does this do to the health/flexibility of the sole? The words that come to mind are "complete suffocation". How does this cushion P3 as described above? To me, sole hardeners are not the therapeutic or protective answer that's needed with thin sole. Hope this helps.....
  7. Good improvement! No more worries like that again, lol! Bar is the growth of your foot. When the hoof started getting its ducks in order, the false sole came out and left the bars standing like that. Not nice bumps to walk on. I'll bet you could see more comfort in her movement right away. I don't think these bars are what you would call "pooling bars". What I saw was one big necklace going all the way around. Pooling is when excessive bar is down at the bottom of the ramp and gets jammed when the support is gone off the end of the ramp and jams into the hoof. It causes the bar to puddle in a round shape right there and become a big blob/bump, or continue to pool across the groove and under the frog. Hence the word "pooling" Yours was a complete bar necklace revealed when the false sole came out. Your ramp ends are clear and nothing has crossed the groove and under the frog. The ramps are still high and not straight, so something else to work on in the coming weeks. Glad you are all squared away!
  8. Recipes For Thrush Treatment

    Epsom salt and water, Borax laundry soap and water, Vinegar and water and Trinity's Dawn idea, No Thrush, when the weather is too wet to justify further soaking. All tools in my tool box. Honey is another one. Epsom Salts and Tea Tree Oil are ones that get tired, so I don't do them as often. I like the Dawn, because 90% of getting rid of thrush is to get spanking clean atleast once a day. When you don't rinse the Dawn off, its leaving a great barrier of protection behind as well. I put a couple of drops in my rain barrels to discourage mosquitoes from laying eggs and that film left on the surface of the water works. I imagine the hoof getting the same protection. Frogs do grow quickly, especially when thrush is not eating it away at the same time. It will also allow the heels to expand. Good luck with the trimmer on Thursday!
  9. Yes, you can pare the bar off the sole and work your way towards the groove. You straighten the bar as you go, then take the height of the bar ramp down where its supposed to be. Color will tell you a lot as well. Everything else is typical bar and just sliver the lump tops and otherwise, leave it alone. The bevel could be tightened up all around this foot. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14467029403" title="7addd6ed-40a1-44bc-929c-767d4ab2391a_zps4ce9bb27 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3836/14467029403_8f3d71bdf8_o.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt="7addd6ed-40a1-44bc-929c-767d4ab2391a_zps4ce9bb27"></a> The real area of concern is halfway back on the frog, where the bar ramp starts. The higher the ramp is from that point, the more it jams into the area at the end of the ramp. This is where abscesses are born. Sliver lightly just in front of the ramp to ensure that contour runs smoothly into the start of the bar ramp and no lumping up before the bar ramp starts. Go after the bar ramp to establish it properly. Everything else, just sliver and smooth out lightly. Hope this helps
  10. Starting All Over, Need Lots Of Support.

    Taking down half that will be fine, focus on getting the bars down with the heel height that you set and bring them down more together in future trims. I would carry the bevel at the sides on back to include the outer heel wall as well, because both heels are flared. The heel height should be just above the frog height. Its like the heels meeting up with the frog and coaxing the frog to start functioning with the heels. This will build the frog even better/faster. Yes, you are going below the level of false sole. Its what's holding the false sole in. The bar should merge with the sole halfway back on the frog and ramp straight up to meet the heel platforms dead on. No bumping up, no curve, surface on it flat to ground. The higher the ramp is going back to the heel, the harder the force punches into the corium, when it goes off the end of the ramp. Pare the ramp down in layers, leaving what's standing behind it alone. Just don't let it bump up higher than the heels, or the walls to the side. Its what is in front of the end of the bar ramp that must be taken only a sliver at a time, starting with getting the tops off the bumps. The ramps can come down, in line with the heel coming down. If you see bar standing above sole, or heel standing above sole, know that they want to come down even with the sole. When the sole on the outside of the bar has gotten its ducks in order, where the bar is now, will be restored sole, with the bar right on the outside of the groove where it belongs...no more ear-shaped heels. Sorry for the delay, soooo busy! Hope this helps.
  11. Point Me In The Right Direction? **more Pictures**

    LOL! I carried that book under my arm for a week in fear of losing it. I read it 5X. Good book! I now have the "Care and Rehabilitation of the Equine Foot" which I can't carry around, too heavy and have to prop it up to read it. I'm on my 2nd way through at this point. Another great book!
  12. Why Does She Stand This Way

    Journey'sgirl is right. We need better pictures. Sounds like you've been on a merry go round. It could be so many things, even above the hoof. Suspected of navicular is not good enough. I'm not going to put my money in any one's mouth that spouts navicular unless they have xrays in their hand. How long was the abscess kicking around before it erupted? Was it a big blow? Doesn't sound like she recovered completely after the blow, if she's pointing her toe a month later. Here, I could go 3 ways....a) the abscess didn't blow completely and is still kicking around in there, the abscess is really a bone infection, or c) still dealing with soft tissue/tendon damage. Were any blood tests done to see if she was fighting infection? What were the ground conditions like in March? Was she sensitive to the cold ground in winter, or was it more like the hardness of snow/ice? I gather that the lameness clinic told you that she was lame....you already knew that....did they tell you anything else? I think xrays for the navicular come first, will tell you other things as well. Her feet look ok, but they are not balanced. They are still flared out in the toe and the farrier saying that she is down in the heel, means that she had no heel height. (the flared forward toe of the past has pulled the heel forward with it, right out from under her.) She is sporting, from what I can tell in this picture, a slightly negative Palmer angle on all feet. That is down on the heel, but to put it simply, it means the heel wall is too short, that has brought the back of P3 down closer to the ground, but it will be in hoof right where its supposed to be, but pair it will a long/forward toe and you have a negative palmer angle, with the front of P3 up in the air and heel short, bringing the back of the bone lower. (neg. palmer) This is hard on the tendons and is hard to remediate...takes good balanced trims and time. She looks to have her heel back, but toes still long/high/forward. Then there's her back feet involved as well, which makes me think, yes she is wonky and the problem may very well be above the hoof...even all the way to the spine. There's no doubt in my mind that she may need a chiro. after all this time to help release the damage done with bad movement and trying avoid pain. Something in her back could be locked and causing all this wonky movement and resulting in pathological feet. I think that xrays and chiro would be my first choices, as well as getting her feet balanced, thrush free and developing stronger. Its going to take good diagnostics and homework for you. These are all just thoughts. I need better pics to atleast tell me what the hoof is saying. At first glance, it looks like she's been rocking the pain off her front feet, standing under in the hinds to do so, and has caused the imbalance on the hinds and she's not over the hump with the front feet yet either. Regardless, I would also have her booted, not shod. With every step she takes and puts weight on, she is promoting the inflammation that eats into bone that will not heal....permanent destruction. Whether it be navicular, or tendons, or other soft tissue damage, it needs to be protected at all costs. Seeing her lame and standing like that is not acceptable and she needs to move, to have the confidence to move without having to pay for it later. Shoes will only mask the problem and perpetuate it Where the concern is, is inside the rim of the shoe, with the trim under it, for the shoe, not the horse. Wedging lifts the heel and points P3's nose back down again. It is not an acceptable practice anymore and tells me something about your farrier. You build and strengthen the heel, while you bring the toe down into balance. Take a stiletto shoe, rip the heels off them and walk. This is a neg. palmer angle. Heel way down, toe in the air, things pulling in the back of your calf and jamming up your shin in the front. The DDFT, which goes down the back of the leg, past the navicular bone and attaches under the middle of P3. Know the stretch on it. Know that if the feet are not balanced, its still going on. If the hoof is balanced, then it will stop and healing can begin. Do post some pics according to the sticky at the top. A video would be very good too. If I can see the feet better, I can atleast tell if anything is talking to me.
  13. Starting All Over, Need Lots Of Support.

    I can see how hard the feet are. Nice, but not for you. If you can just get the tough outer layer off, it gets easier from there. IS your knife sharp? You should be able to sliver and not have to yank. Soak a full 20 min. I rotate a Davis Boot around the feet ahead of me, medicated for thrush. I catch up on grooming with the first foot soaking. Geez, give your yourself a pat on the back and continue to put patience on you sleeve. Good job! I say that first. Life is never perfect, but she's got nice feet and nice trim. We need to focus on the bars. She's walking on them and it hurts. A dremel tool sounds good to me right now. You could run a small grinder along the top of the bar wall, slowly bringing the bar ramp down with ease and control. Its those bar ramps that holding the false sole in at the heel. Simply lower the ramp and what's behind it promptly comes out, and straightens out on it own. Good with online education, also, but give yourself time to digest, experience and see the sense of it too. When you go out to the barn, it should be confident background to refer to out there, cause when you are out there, its just you and the horse talking. Relax and just listen and look and be patient. As you look, use the growth from the last trim to talk to you. Its a story and as soon as you start trimming, you're tearing pages out of the book, so don't jump the gun. Don't have your rasp in your hand at the time and relax Whatever it takes to promote comfortable movement, cause that's her homework and doing just that, will relieve you of trimming responsibilities as she gets her own ducks in order. Having faith is just as important as patience. Right Front She's been weighting her outside greatly. There is bruising from 12 o'clock to 4 o'clock on the edge of the sole and possibly the edge of P3. I think the bruise happened first, then she avoided by weighting the outside. That side is pulled straighter in shape, breakover and frog not straight. She weighted the outside to avoid the pain, thus jamming up the outside wall/inside flared. The frog always points to the high side and is pointing to 11o'clock. In the solar shot you get a better sense of frog direction and skewed hoof shape. The inside still needs to come down...all sole/wall even, to each other all the way around. Bar brought down and heel brought down with it to be balanced with the other. That bruise is why she is sore. I would prefer to get her balanced according to sole and boot her for a bit. It looks better now than before, you have nice concavity forming and getting balanced is what will fix any further injury and allow healing. Getting the bars down is what will allow all this to happen. The weight won't be coming down off the top of those bars to slam into the bruise as the hoof moves forward. It will float past it instead. The bars are the root of all evil in her feet, but I guess you know that. You can literally draw these lines on the hoof with a sharpie to know your bar ramp goals. The relief is going to instant! <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14367099245" title="RF trim by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3900/14367099245_4d978ef6d2_o.jpg" width="640" height="480" alt="RF trim"></a> On the medial side, the shaded white is flat to ground, the grey is gone in bevel and the black is gone from the outside. This will also help this bruise. Left Front <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14363895841" title="Left Front by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3896/14363895841_76687e9cb3_o.jpg" width="640" height="480" alt="Left Front"></a> <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14344254316" title="IMG_1358_zpsc3d98d23 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3906/14344254316_6554848040_o.jpg" width="800" height="580" alt="IMG_1358_zpsc3d98d23"></a> The wall height, from this angle should be where the existing bars are, the heels down as shown and bars should be where the purple ones show. Yes, this trim. Any wall/white line thickness outside of the soul, showing damage, trim to the shape shown on the medial side of the RF.
  14. Bell And Leg Boots A Must?

    The horse is greatly over-extending on a curve, going around a barrel. I saw that video too, and also agree. Only, the bell boots won't protect the area that was cut in the video, so I'd definitely consider leg protection. I say yes to the bell boots and tough/well developed/balanced hooves. If you want a fun filled summer of worry free activity, then prevent, prevent and don't go there. Murphy's Law always rules. Leave the "what if's" and look the other way. Prevent and go confidently. This is with all things for his care. Be sensitive to all his needs and fulfill them. His ongoing good health is your ticket.
  15. Point Me In The Right Direction? **more Pictures**

    I think you're doing a wonderful job and his feet are getting better by leaps and bounds. If any concerns pop up, just remember to obey the sole and you won't go wrong.
  16. Corium Or Bruising?

    I hear the happiness in your words. I don't know that I could do that....have to leave my horse behind, I'm happy for you and her, shaking my head and wondering if I ever could have survived such a situation. Glad you're re-united! She's in good hands now, cause nobody loves her like you do. Like getting a old friend back. Sorry I went on so long, will try not to in the future. I don't know about these pics, or if I am able to see them. Let me know if I can help further, and enjoy in the meantime!
  17. Corium Or Bruising?

    Bruising. The fact that you shaved a layer off to this point is good. Looks so red and new, but its not, just blood that hasn't been exposed to oxygen. Its good to leave some and not "get to the bottom of it." It leaves protection, gets the aggravation gone instantly just from what you've already removed and allows the healing to begin. Sounds good to me. This foot needed a trim earlier. The bars are excessive and heel balance is off. I need a good heel shot to show you the heel balance. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14299052453" title="0522141041a_zps803601b7 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3769/14299052453_e6c9971c4c_o.jpg" width="2000" height="3336" alt="0522141041a_zps803601b7"></a> As for your question...you see the turquoise arrows? Basically, you need to get that bar ramp piece outlined down to the red line and on forward as shown. Like carving a perfect ramp on the sheer side of a cliff. What is on the outside should be left alone/get its own ducks in order. If there is a corner between the two, just a shallow bevel to coax the meld into concavity, just smooth things and let them develop/heal on their own. Now the false sole will come out of the area between bar and wall and show you just how far back the heel should be. (black dot back to black dot) The area behind the bar wall looks good. I drew a turquoise shape on it. You want it to have a flat shaped surface, no bumping up and definitely not bumping up higher than the wall beside it or the heel platforms. Just make sure that the surface is the right shape and it will resolve itself. There's so much to see in this picture, that I'll just start at the bottom of it. Think shape. When you see the shape of things, it tells you a story of the growth. The heel bulb line, not equal. Left side jammed straight up/tight ball. Outside heel mimicking flare and is flaring. The first yellow line is medial/lateral balance in the back of the foot. The perpendicular line to it, running out the tip of the frog is another center line. The sole on the left side of the frog, (inside) is narrower in width than the sole on the outside. The 2nd yellow line is the existing heel balance. (I need a heel shot, can't do them on solars, but this is close) The red lines are heel balance which should be, (which I blew, its the lower one) and the height of the bars and their shape. Note the shape difference of the heels between existing yellow lines and the red lines. The back of the heel platforms should be the shape of my line, not coming into a point like a pair of ears. This is lack of development in the back of the foot. You want the shape of the back of the heel platforms to be squarely back...(maximum width of strong heel to land on and getting rid of the bar height is going to have a lot to do about its improvement) Study it for a minute. Compare the height of the yellow lines, following the black contours down to the groove. Realize just how much bar wall is really there. Note the shape on top of the bar walls. The left one is one high chunk, been pounded straight into and the right side flared outward in a big high mound, both showing just like the heel bulbs are. The inside of this foot has been higher than the outside long enough that the sole has changed its balance. Now the inside is lower, leaving the outside higher, not so much in the heel balance lines, but forward on the bars, the right one mounding up/jamming up and is dictating to the heel height, instead of working in line with them. Note that I left the inside heel platform alone and only brought down on the outside heel a bit. Note on the right heel platform, the difference in angles between red and yellow lines. The yellow line feels that it's height goes up and up as it leaves the heel...no....stay flat to ground. ..square the shape for strength. The shape is on the left bar only, not on the right. The right I wanted to show you just how highly excessive that bar is by the distance it needs to come down. Straight ramp with surface facing the ground that emerges from the sole halfway back on the frog and ramps straight up to meet the heel bulbs dead on.. one strong connection. In front of the ramps, just a sliver taken and coaxed to meld into at the same height as where the bar ramp starts. Then, when you get into the bar ramp proper, it becomes that ledge of correct height running straight to the heels like a shelf on a sheer cliff. He'll do the rest, just keep the existing contour smooth. The shelf on the cliff wall will be shallower as the material behind the bar gets its ducks in order. These bumps of callous on sole, mounding on layers of bars can manifest itself like huge arcing mounds or tiny little dimple bumps, like the one straight out from the tip of the frog. The goal is to get those bar ramps down and any bumps of any kind, just shave off the bump part so it doesn't jam up and hurt the horse. Take everything that's chalky. Do a light 45 bevel on the sole beside the groove, if needed to allow the frog breathing room and remove "pinch". You should be able to see clearly, the groove all the way around the frog. That's all it takes to turn things right around, just relieve it. Coaxing the concave shape.. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14092614997" title="0522141041a_zps803601b7 222 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5556/14092614997_c07a52d291_o.jpg" width="2000" height="2000" alt="0522141041a_zps803601b7 222"></a> Same picture, but white area could very well be right at the height it needs to be already. But then there's a steep incline higher to the top of the bar. (yellow line). Then it changes to a shallower angle approaching the wall. The yellow line may present as a ridge or corner between these two angles, in which case, I'd knock the corner off with a tiny bevel and help the concavity to develop. (coaxing for the red lines) I'd do it again at the groove also, if I couldn't see it...other side too. Shape. (also promotes dirt donuts with every step, making for a self-cleaning hoof) Your coaxing for a hoof that resembles the inside of a cereal bowl, with the frog sitting proudly above it all, not the other way around. Make sense? He needs more frequent trims and more movement. He can do this all this work of transition and developing a stronger back of the hoof himself, with more movement. The green lines are more bar of older growth, showing in waves like it does. Bars grow hoof...its a good thing. They grow out and forward and adding growth to the hoof. Its when they get too high, start becoming huge holding walls pushing the sole away out to the side (why the ear shape) when they should be right on the other side of the groove running with it. This is what breaks the quarters out or causes separation as you take this force on out to the side wall. It will even break a heel out. The white line looks wide all the way around. (starting to stretch) Separation on the inside quarter from the pounding. The white line looks like its a mounded shape between sole and wall as well. Check the wall and get it even with the sole, the white line moundedness and the top of the wall all even with each other, all the way across...flat to ground. Then the bevel. (black line) If you want the truth on the heel balance etc. I need a heel shot. Hope this helps....
  18. Corium Or Bruising?

    Bruising. The fact that you shaved a layer off to this point is good. Looks so red and new, but its not, just blood that hasn't been exposed to oxygen. Its good to leave some and not "get to the bottom of it." It leaves protection, gets the aggravation gone instantly just from what you've already removed and allows the healing to begin. Sounds good to me. This foot needed a trim earlier. The bars are excessive and heel balance is off. I need a good heel shot to show you the heel balance. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14299052453" title="0522141041a_zps803601b7 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3769/14299052453_e6c9971c4c_o.jpg" width="2000" height="3336" alt="0522141041a_zps803601b7"></a> As for your question...you see the turquoise arrows? Basically, you need to get that bar ramp piece outlined down to the red line and on forward as shown. Like carving a perfect ramp on the sheer side of a cliff. What is on the outside should be left alone/get its own ducks in order. If there is a corner between the two, just a shallow bevel to coax the meld into concavity, just smooth things and let them develop/heal on their own. Now the false sole will come out of the area between bar and wall and show you just how far back the heel should be. (black dot back to black dot) The area behind the bar wall looks good. I drew a turquoise shape on it. You want it to have a flat shaped surface, no bumping up and definitely not bumping up higher than the wall beside it or the heel platforms. Just make sure that the surface is the right shape and it will resolve itself. There's so much to see in this picture, that I'll just start at the bottom of it. Think shape. When you see the shape of things, it tells you a story of the growth. The heel bulb line, not equal. Left side jammed straight up/tight ball. Outside heel mimicking flare and is flaring. The first yellow line is medial/lateral balance in the back of the foot. The perpendicular line to it, running out the tip of the frog is another center line. The sole on the left side of the frog, (inside) is narrower in width than the sole on the outside. The 2nd yellow line is the existing heel balance. (I need a heel shot, can't do them on solars, but this is close) The red lines are heel balance which should be, (which I blew, its the lower one) and the height of the bars and their shape. Note the shape difference of the heels between existing yellow lines and the red lines. The back of the heel platforms should be the shape of my line, not coming into a point like a pair of ears. This is lack of development in the back of the foot. You want the shape of the back of the heel platforms to be squarely back...(maximum width of strong heel to land on and getting rid of the bar height is going to have a lot to do about its improvement) Study it for a minute. Compare the height of the yellow lines, following the black contours down to the groove. Realize just how much bar wall is really there. Note the shape on top of the bar walls. The left one is one high chunk, been pounded straight into and the right side flared outward in a big high mound, both showing just like the heel bulbs are. The inside of this foot has been higher than the outside long enough that the sole has changed its balance. Now the inside is lower, leaving the outside higher, not so much in the heel balance lines, but forward on the bars, the right one mounding up/jamming up and is dictating to the heel height, instead of working in line with them. Note that I left the inside heel platform alone and only brought down on the outside heel a bit. Note on the right heel platform, the difference in angles between red and yellow lines. The yellow line feels that it's height goes up and up as it leaves the heel...no....stay flat to ground. ..square the shape for strength. The shape is on the left bar only, not on the right. The right I wanted to show you just how highly excessive that bar is by the distance it needs to come down. Straight ramp with surface facing the ground that emerges from the sole halfway back on the frog and ramps straight up to meet the heel bulbs dead on.. one strong connection. In front of the ramps, just a sliver taken and coaxed to meld into at the same height as where the bar ramp starts. Then, when you get into the bar ramp proper, it becomes that ledge of correct height running straight to the heels like a shelf on a sheer cliff. He'll do the rest, just keep the existing contour smooth. The shelf on the cliff wall will be shallower as the material behind the bar gets its ducks in order. These bumps of callous on sole, mounding on layers of bars can manifest itself like huge arcing mounds or tiny little dimple bumps, like the one straight out from the tip of the frog. The goal is to get those bar ramps down and any bumps of any kind, just shave off the bump part so it doesn't jam up and hurt the horse. Take everything that's chalky. Do a light 45 bevel on the sole beside the groove, if needed to allow the frog breathing room and remove "pinch". You should be able to see clearly, the groove all the way around the frog. That's all it takes to turn things right around, just relieve it. The green lines are more bar of older growth, showing in waves like it does. Bars grow hoof...its a good thing. They grow out and forward and adding growth to the hoof. Its when they get too high, start becoming huge holding walls pushing the sole away out to the side (why the ear shape) when they should be right on the other side of the groove running with it. This is what breaks the quarters out or causes separation as you take this force on out to the side wall. It will even break a heel out. The white line looks wide all the way around. (starting to stretch) Separation on the inside quarter from the pounding. The white line looks like its a mounded shape between sole and wall as well. Check the wall and get it even with the sole, the white line moundedness and the top of the wall all even with each other, all the way across...flat to ground. Then the bevel. (black line) If you want the truth on the heel balance etc. I need a heel shot. Hope this helps....
  19. Point Me In The Right Direction? **more Pictures**

    LR <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14032718780" title="LR Front new by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5578/14032718780_decb10eb6e_o.jpg" width="800" height="692" alt="LR Front new"></a> The problem is a high inside heel and quarter. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14216027301" title="LR Heel new by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5311/14216027301_fe074c0874_o.jpg" width="800" height="1422" alt="LR Heel new"></a> The height of the left side is the culprit, for the length of the blue bracket. The dot at 10:30 is where things really start to part company with the sole line and get higher. The lump at 9 o'clock isn't helping either. Hopefully it has popped off, or you can pop it off. If not then lower the wall right thru it and keep it together with the wall height. Not taking any heel on the right, but note the left and from there on forward. Note how much toe I'm taking as well. Get it all flat to ground and then set your bevel.
  20. Point Me In The Right Direction? **more Pictures**

    RR <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14020058379" title="RR Heel lines by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5077/14020058379_573ee4f9c4_o.jpg" width="1000" height="1052" alt="RR Heel lines"></a> <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14206620074" title="RR Heel Trim by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2900/14206620074_38cb64f734_o.jpg" width="1000" height="1052" alt="RR Heel Trim"></a> I didn't finish this one, as I wanted to show you how much toe I was taking. With the toe and heel so flared forward, the goal is to keep the toe wall strictly down to sole and bevel maintained, while keeping the quarters clear and going straight back to the back of the heel platforms. Heel height preserved and only tweaked to balance and keep the surface of the heel platforms facing the ground. Front of the heel platform level with the back of the heel platform and flat to ground and no where should the ramp bump up higher. (see first pic, right side) Stay with the beveling rules, bevel all the way around like the fronts, maintain the bevel and the toe will be coming back the whole time. Keeping the heels balanced and flat to ground will stop the shape that smushes the heel forward with every step. With the bars straightened and brought down, the coronary band will straighten out, the quarters will develop, false sole will shed at the heel, thrush is spit out and flexibility/development improves in the back of the foot....and tension is relieved off the DDFT. The 1st pic, the area between my heel balance line and black hair line below all smushes forward at an angle. When you have arrived, it will be standing straight up with the heels on top and all facing the ground. Look carefully at the back of the frog in this pic. The new heels have already started giving it lift Flare forward is one of the hardest pathologies to remediate, so patience and staying on top of the trim will see him improving steadily. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14206731535" title="RR Heel 2 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2902/14206731535_af03721e5f_o.jpg" width="1000" height="971" alt="RR Heel 2"></a> <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14020145837" title="RR Side by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5572/14020145837_396692da9e_o.jpg" width="697" height="462" alt="RR Side"></a>
  21. Point Me In The Right Direction? **more Pictures**

    Left Front <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14223199213" title="LF Heel by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2933/14223199213_63ab61f75b_o.jpg" width="1000" height="974" alt="LF Heel"></a> The white lines show the excess of growth and need to be brought down even with the sole again. Always with the quarters, toe is fine. Heels brought down to the red line and in the same shape as the red line. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14200553622" title="LF Heel 2 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5592/14200553622_d5b75772ab_o.jpg" width="1000" height="975" alt="LF Heel 2"></a> What it should look like when done. Right Front Follow the rules outlined above for setting the bevel. Leave the inside basement membrane intact and bevel on out from there....45 angle, not 90. (see side shot) Leading edge of the bevel <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14203007524" title="RF Solar 1 by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5563/14203007524_89dcd42538_o.jpg" width="576" height="1024" alt="RF Solar 1"></a> What you do is keep obeying the rules of the sole and the toe comes back by itself. You need the most patience of all with the toe as it didn't get that way overnight and needs time to remediate. I see big improvement already! <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14016473310" title="RF Heel by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2912/14016473310_5cf7ef31d8_o.jpg" width="1000" height="840" alt="RF Heel"></a> <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/14200603582" title="RF Side by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2901/14200603582_c1130b3521_o.jpg" width="609" height="405" alt="RF Side"></a> What's in white is existing, what's in green is going to be improvement with this trim. (note bevel shape and a bit of flare taken off the top) Red is "arrived" and where green supersedes the red, then that has been arrived at already this trim. Your about halfway back to where the heels and toes want to be. Note also that the tighter growth coming down from the coronary band is halfway there as well. Patience. Be back about the hinds.....Hope this helps.
  22. This Is About My Back

    I once compared my physical life with a person who went to the gym and realized that I didn't live by gym rules, that when I went out there, I was on a mission for others and thought of myself last. I realized that I needed to do some stretching to limber up. If I need to pay attention to it, I do yoga stretching exercises, otherwise, If I'm on the go, I'll just stretch my whole spine. The washing machine is just the right height to stretch on. I put my toes up to the front edge, stand on them and my hands, heels forward on the front corner, then slowly let my heels drop, but before my heels reach the floor, I'm completely hanging, letting the front of the machine support my pelvis and keep my back straight. I go very slow and ask. Do it a second time and I'm surprised how easier it is. When I walk away, it feels like I'm 2" taller and I'm good to go, never a crinch after that. But this is what works for me and I'm used to this. I have straightened bones as well at times. I've felt them slip back into place. My problems are in the hips, which were the root cause of 5 caesarians. I haven't got time for Doctors and I'm not much for pills, but was surprised how one dose of Motrin could turn things around. I may be a bit unorthodox, but it works for me. A 30 minute massage will make me sore the next day, but then I'm good for a week. Hot baths are best, sleeping with a pillow under your knees. The cardinal rule with muscles, is that they must be stretched first before they can even begin to contract and work. In this scenario, I imagine the muscles not working together, miss-firing and not supporting the spine. I like your advice too, Chocomare. I've got some in the barn, but haven't tried it in the house yet! If this happened to me, I'd do just what she said, go straight for the ice pack, just like I would for the horse. Makes sense to me!
  23. Point Me In The Right Direction? **more Pictures**

    Well, it doesn't sound like he was angry, but I wonder still. Life is never perfect and he had nothing to add, no tweaks anywhere? Did he look at all 4 feet, or just one? It doesn't sound like he was very supportive of your efforts, like he was making face? I feel that you pretty much have things in hand, but positive support is great and this is a new kind of trim. Did your Mom say anything through all this? Did he set up a new appt. with you before he left? You know how Murphy's Law can rule sometimes and things get over your head. It would be nice to know that he's got your back, should you need him, that he'll be around for a check up in the future. I have a feeling that Smokum got the same feeling from your last post and sent a pm just in case this guy doesn't come back next you call him. Good idea. The more tools in the tool box, the better. I look forward to your next pics and glad I could help.
  24. Point Me In The Right Direction? **more Pictures**

    lol! Hiding on the next page: RIGHT REAR <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/13932925067" title="RR Trimmed by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2921/13932925067_64ebc21fed_o.jpg" width="800" height="764" alt="RR Trimmed"></a> LEFT REAR <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/92429952@N03/13932978748" title="LR Trimmed by missyclare, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7207/13932978748_b47a646d8d_o.jpg" width="576" height="1023" alt="LR Trimmed"></a>
  25. Point Me In The Right Direction? **more Pictures**

    Sorry, I've been away from the computer. Good trim. Quarters are still feeling longish. The sections between the lines is what has to go yet. When the sections between the lines are down even with sole, then you have the perfect sunset AND you eliminate the dint shape at 12 oclock at the toe...an important improved shape in the sunset as well. Red line shows heel balance on the RF. Is perfect on the LF. It's not so much that you didn't get down to live sole with your wall height, its that the surface is not flat to ground. Look at the RF on the left side and know that if you ran your thumb over sole/wall/and off, that you would be going up and up higher before going off. Flat to ground and dead even with the sole. I've got 3 horizontal lines on the left heel. The red line is a tweak for improved heel balance, the black one above it is the existing heel balance and the short black line above that is higher hoof again because its not flat to ground. The dent at the toe should be gone and no trace of higher wings at the quarters. Both feet are just a tweak, I'd like to see how your did on the hinds. When is the farrier due next? I'm also interested in what he has to say and hopefully not be upset.