dancinglite

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  1. canter quality deteriorating while trot remains good

    quote: Originally posted by TracyA: One other question... Do you have any suggestions for a saddle for high withers and broad shoulders? Ideally, I'd like someone who will fit the saddle to us both. Semi-custom or custom are fine. A cut back of some sort. You will have to do some searching. Regarding the canter, sounds like a balance problem. I would do a lot more canter lunging on her with sliding side reins.
  2. Lunging Question

    quote: Originally posted by barrelracingchick16: Hello everyone, My question is however, by doing this will that desensitize her to even the physically touching her of the whip? After these little "reminders" should she start responding better? How do you all get the lazy/not phased by the whip- ones moving? Actually you desensatized her by the sacking and smacking the whip on the ground. I am sure if your parents told you over and over again to not do something( even clapping their hands as a warning ) with nothing else but that warning, it wouldn't take you very long to realize that there is bark but no bite. Same with the horse. You gave her no reason to do what you wanted and with no consequence to her in refusing you, your mare said " why should I". A hit told her you had other resources and maybe obeying would be a good idea. Don't overdo it but be determined. When she fails to respond you need to "inform" her that it isn't a good idea to do so.
  3. Lunging Question

    quote: Originally posted by barrelracingchick16: Hello everyone, My question is however, by doing this will that desensitize her to even the physically touching her of the whip? After these little "reminders" should she start responding better? How do you all get the lazy/not phased by the whip- ones moving? Actually you desensatized her by the sacking and smacking the whip on the ground. I am sure if your parents told you over and over again to not do something( even clapping their hands as a warning ) with nothing else but that warning, it wouldn't take you very long to realize that there is bark but no bite. Same with the horse. You gave her no reason to do what you wanted and with no consequence to her in refusing you, your mare said " why should I". A hit told her you had other resources and maybe obeying would be a good idea. Don't overdo it but be determined. When she fails to respond you need to "inform" her that it isn't a good idea to do so.
  4. Sagittarius Stallion

    The "S" line has not been prominent in many international level events. There are individuals that have done fine but the line as a whole is a good riding line with sporatic individuals able to compete at the higher levels.
  5. Sagittarius Stallion

    http://www.geocities.com/travishallequestrian/breeding.html Take a look at this one.
  6. Flying lead changes and bucking/behavior issues

    I agree with your trainer. It also seems like they have been rushed ( training timetable wise) and the horse is confused and his balance is probably tested so a buck to right it is not unusual. Often a horse that trips or missed a step will jump up and buck or throw his legs out to re-position themselves. I don't train flying changes the method that you use and rarely even run into the type of problem you are having. Give the horse some time off and restart the flying changes slower. Just for your information the following is how I do it and even the most untrainable horses learn how to with very few problems ( mostly time involved) My preference is walk transition to canter or halt transition to canter. I also keep in the back of my mind that horse are notorious for learning something in certains areas of the arena and once done in a certain place and way will repeat that pattern over and over again. That being said I simply teach the horse a pattern. I will canter a few strides then walk,then counter canter a few strides then walk. I will repeat this exercise for as long as it takes. I usually start on a circle and the amount of canter strides is unimportant in the beginning. If the horse gets excited ( some do) then go on with something else and try again later in the ride or another day. When the horse accepts the back forth pattern on the circle go anywhere in the arena and I find the straight side is very good. In some cases the horse may respond better on the straight side first before the circle and that is also OK. Slowly shorten the number of canter strides between each change of lead. If you can "feel" your horse you will almost "know" that the horse is ready for the first change from the counter-canter to the regular canter and if it is done on a curve ( corner) you have a very good chanch of getting a clean change ( front and back). Go back to your "pattern" and wait for the next "opportunity". I prefer at this time to try to go to the halt canter to halt--then counter-canter halt---canter halt--etc, Again when the opportunity offers itself the flying change fron the counter canter. It is impotrant to ensure that the horse is walking or halted and not rushed back to the opposite lead too soon. The length of time between each canters are shortened as you go along and the possibility of 2 changes could be possible. I am sure that you understand that you will need to swithch direction from left to right rein so that your counter-canter opportunities will able to be exercised on both leads. Good luck.
  7. counter canter vs. changes

    If your aids for counter canter and lead changes are strong and defined then the horse will not get confused. You may wish to try for flying changes outside the movement that you are asking for going into the counter canter. In other words go directly accros the arena from the long side to the opposite long side( change of direction through the middle) and ask for a lead change in the middle before you reach the opposite wall. Ask for the counter canter as you are doing now. Two totally different movements ask in two totally different areas of the arena and in a different manner.
  8. Behind the Motion/Posting

    If you are ahead or behind the motion and I assume you mean you rise or fall so that you are not in synch with the horses timing it usually means you are rushing the posting or moving at you own time. The best thing is to simply allow the horse to throw up up( not the best word but I hope you understand). The other problem could be if your stirrups are too long ( difficulty rising) or too short ( rising and being pitched forward or backwards) so you may wish to check the length. If you are not sure then change the stirrup setting and see what happens.
  9. Lead changes....

    I NEVER try to get flying changes from the trot. The possibility of cross-canter, rushing and an unbalanced canter is too likely to happen. My preference is walk to canter or halt to canter and I think you will find that a disunited canter is EXTREMELY rare under these circumstances. I also keep in the back of my mind that horse are notorious for learning something in certains areas of the arena and once done in a certain place and way will repeat that pattern over and over again. That being said I simply teach the horse a pattern. I will canter a few strides then walk,then counter canter a few strides then walk ( and confirmation in the counter canter is important). I will repeat this exercise for as long as it takes. I usually start on a circle and the amount of canter strides is unimpotrant in the beginning. If the horse gets excited ( some do) then go on with something else and try again later in the ride or another day. When the horse accepts the back forth pattern on the circle go anywhere in the arena and I find the straight side is very good. In some cases the horse may respond better on the straight side first before the circle and that is also OK. Slowly shorten the number of canter strides between each change of lead. If you can "feel" your horse you will almost "know" that the horse is ready for the first change from the counter-canter to the regular canter and if it is done on a curve ( corner) you have a very good chanch of getting a clean change ( front and back). Go back to your "pattern" and wait for the next "opportunity". I prefer at this time to try to go to the halt canter to halt--then counter-canter halt---canter halt--etc, Again when the opportunity offers itself the flying change fron the counter canter. It is impotrant to ensure that the horse is walking or halted and not rushed back to the opposite lead too soon. The length of time between each canters are shortened as you go along and the possibility of 2 changes could be possible. I am sure that you understand that you will need to swithch direction from left to right rein so that your counter-canter opportunities will able to be exercised on both leads. If you are planning further training to work into tempi changes then it is imperative that the changes be clean and STRAIGHT. I have seen too many higher level horse doing tempis accross the diagonal with either the front end or rear end swinging. This is often the result of training the horse to make their changes by swinging the horse's balance ( usually forehand) back and forth to get the flying change in the initial training. This balance change will by the nature of moving the forehand cause the hindquarters to shift outwards and not allow the horse to properly engage under itself ---therefore causing the lead change in the front but now the rear is left behind and not changing.
  10. friend leasing my horse??

    Maybe she will lose interest and save you from playing the "bad guy". You may be luckier than I was as my "friend" didn't feed my boy ( leased to her also)and within 2 months had him approx. 200 pounds underweight. With everyday riding and only about 3-4 flakes of hay a day he lost weight quickly.It has taken me since Dec 2 to get him right as far as weight. I haven't ridden him in a while just waiting for him to get better. So feel yourself lucky.
  11. half halt

    This is my explaination and it is taken from the article I wrote a year ago. Throughout all training it is imperative the rider understand the half-halt and the halt. To explain them I offer this. The halt is achieved by the deepening of the riders seat and stimulation of the horses hindquarters to reach forward and underneath his body, thus accepting a greater load of weight. The stimulation is the result of the riders leg pressure on both sides of the horses body causing the "lifting" of the spine to meet the rider's seat. The rider will keep his upper body straight and push through the small of his back into passive and sustaining hands. They will accept any pull on the reins if necessary and remain unchanged. Once halted the rider allow a slight relaxation of the upper body and at the same time will advance the hands slightly to give the horse a period of relaxation. This relaxation is a vital part of the training process because without them nervousness and restlessness will set in.Any roughness or excessive action on the part of the rider will cause the failure of a soft and fluid stop. In the half halts the method is the same with the sole difference being that the hands will allow the motion to continue. In this case the driving controls will outweigh the restraining ones. As far as half-halts it is the one subject that seems to create endless discussions and usually ending in no one being any the wiser than before. When you go to forums dealing specifically with dressage and you still see the endless pages of discussions by well known trainers and no real resolution then we are in good company. Different trainers create descriptions of what it is and what it does to the point that we appear to be entering a country with a different language. Combine this with its use that will vary as the horse progress causes its interpretation to be based on one horses reaction. However when applied equally to another the cause and effect can differ greatly. On the basic level the half-halt is used to signal the horse that a decrease in rate is being asked for. It could also be a signal to improve its balance or lighten the horses weight on the reins. On the highest level the half halt becomes the merest whisper of controls in that it is created with the seat and hinted at with the reins. DL
  12. What do you think?

    quote: Originally posted by wiseacre: [QB] Anywho, I thought I saw his left hind not tracking as much as the right. I saw the same thing but would have liked to see the lunge in the other direction to be sure. I did not see real lameness and until it is shown just take short workouts with him.
  13. a video someone posted a while back...

    Duplicate [ 12-24-2006, 12:03 PM: Message edited by: dancinglite ]
  14. a video someone posted a while back...

    Duplicate [ 12-24-2006, 12:03 PM: Message edited by: dancinglite ]
  15. a video someone posted a while back...

    You should take a look at this one. Sorry same as above [ 12-24-2006, 12:03 PM: Message edited by: dancinglite ]