ejforrest

Members
  • Content count

    1,772
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by ejforrest

  1. Question about beat pulp.

    Once the horses system has adjusted to the diet change, you can feed as much as you want when feeding for weight, up to a gallon or more a day. I feed 2 gallons to my 27 year old along with a cup of fat twice a day. He is a hard keeper in the winter but holds his weight on this diet. You might want to add a complete vitamin/supplement along with the beet pulp and fat. You dont have to soak beet pulp, just wet it down so its not dusty and wet enough for the horse to swallow. I have a choker so I add enough water to make it soupy. I bought a horse in May that was half dead and have been feeding her this same diet and so far she has gained a 100 pounds with no colic or founder episodes. Beet pulp is great for weight, older horses, and sick horses because it is an "easy to digest fiber" and safe to feed alot of it.
  2. Equine Health Insurance (X Post)

    Go to www.agririsk.com This is a horse, trainers, and farm insurance company called Agri*Risk Services or call: 1-800-821-5558
  3. Equine Health Insurance (X Post)

    Go to www.agririsk.com This is a horse, trainers, and farm insurance company called Agri*Risk Services or call: 1-800-821-5558
  4. It is common for Appy's to choke. The fist time mine did it, the vet told me it was common. Him and his family raised and bred Appy's. Out of the three I have, two are chokers. If your horse isnt working hard-racinc, polo, eventing, or endurance, you dont need to feed grains. They cause all sorts of health problems. If you feel you have to feed grains, wet it down to a mashy soupy mix. I feed beet pulp which is pretty dry and I make it into a soup. I havent had any problems so far this year with any of them choking. My vet told me to give my horses at least "2" hours for them to work it out themselves when they start to choke. Havent had to have him out in 2 years since I wait. Havent lost a horse either. You do have to watch to see if they inhale any feed. This can cause respitory problems.
  5. It is common for Appy's to choke. The fist time mine did it, the vet told me it was common. Him and his family raised and bred Appy's. Out of the three I have, two are chokers. If your horse isnt working hard-racinc, polo, eventing, or endurance, you dont need to feed grains. They cause all sorts of health problems. If you feel you have to feed grains, wet it down to a mashy soupy mix. I feed beet pulp which is pretty dry and I make it into a soup. I havent had any problems so far this year with any of them choking. My vet told me to give my horses at least "2" hours for them to work it out themselves when they start to choke. Havent had to have him out in 2 years since I wait. Havent lost a horse either. You do have to watch to see if they inhale any feed. This can cause respitory problems.
  6. Owner is responsible to "pay" for the care. Stable's responsible to take care of the horse, that is what they are getting paid for-to take care of a horse. If the owner is so concerned about the horse colicking all the time, tell her to have an endoscope done to see if it has ulcers. Ulcers is one of the signs of a chronic colicking horse. Tell the owner to tell the BM or BO to stop grains. Grains will cause colic. Most of the time its the diet that makes the horse colic.
  7. Blanketing

    Unless you are showing your horse, blanketing your horse is a personal decision. The blanket will give your horse added warmth, but in return will decrease your horses natural winter hair growth. "A horses hair coat changes with the seasons; therefore the ability of the hair coat to regulate body temperature is related to its length, thickness, and density per square inch of surface area of skin. One major factor in the hairs ability to serve in thermoregulation is the ability of a small muscle associated with every hair follicle under control of the nervous system to pull the hairs to a standing "puffed-up" position(piloerection). If the horse has a normal full winter coat, blankets might actually prevent the hair from raising and reduce the natrual insulating effect should the horse need it." "Horses do well in the winter and can stand temps goig below -30 degrees, as long as there is no wind or rain. To help keep your horse warm, feed more hay. Hay heats the horse from the inside out". "Fiber is harder to break down and the fermentation creats lots of warm. So give an extra flake or two when the temps drop below 32 degrees."
  8. Blanketing

    Unless you are showing your horse, blanketing your horse is a personal decision. The blanket will give your horse added warmth, but in return will decrease your horses natural winter hair growth. "A horses hair coat changes with the seasons; therefore the ability of the hair coat to regulate body temperature is related to its length, thickness, and density per square inch of surface area of skin. One major factor in the hairs ability to serve in thermoregulation is the ability of a small muscle associated with every hair follicle under control of the nervous system to pull the hairs to a standing "puffed-up" position(piloerection). If the horse has a normal full winter coat, blankets might actually prevent the hair from raising and reduce the natrual insulating effect should the horse need it." "Horses do well in the winter and can stand temps goig below -30 degrees, as long as there is no wind or rain. To help keep your horse warm, feed more hay. Hay heats the horse from the inside out". "Fiber is harder to break down and the fermentation creats lots of warm. So give an extra flake or two when the temps drop below 32 degrees."
  9. need advice

    By Richard Mansmann, VMD, PhD, director of the Equine Health Program at North Carolina State University: "Horses that are physically stressed with poor nutrition are more susceptible to rain rot; part of the treatment plan for those horses is an improved diet. Sometimes a combination of penicillin and streptomycin is used". "Mild cases generally respond to topical treatments, such as washing the horse with an iodine shampoo."
  10. need advice

    By Richard Mansmann, VMD, PhD, director of the Equine Health Program at North Carolina State University: "Horses that are physically stressed with poor nutrition are more susceptible to rain rot; part of the treatment plan for those horses is an improved diet. Sometimes a combination of penicillin and streptomycin is used". "Mild cases generally respond to topical treatments, such as washing the horse with an iodine shampoo."
  11. Excessive Bowels + Odd Behavior

    Check for sand in the gut. Sand will cause loose stools/diarrhea.
  12. Excessive Bowels + Odd Behavior

    Check for sand in the gut. Sand will cause loose stools/diarrhea.
  13. Red Cell for energy- You shouldnt use an iron supplement unless the horse has had a blood test and has demonstrated actual anemia. Iron toxicosis is far more common in horses than iron deficiency and the horses body has no way to excrete excess iron. You can add corn/veg/soy oil for more energy. Fat is a "calmer energy" and doesnt cause blood/glucose spikes which can cause over excitability as when feeding grains. Feeding fat also supplies 2.5 times more energy than feeding corn, oats, or barely. No starch in fat. Fat is well tolorated by the horse with no digetive upset. Add slowly. A fat supplemented diet can be up to 8% to 10% of the horses diet. "For reasons we dont yet fully understand, the horses body must "learn" to use fat as an energy source, it can take three to four weeks, and the blood chemistry might continue to adapt for up to six weeks. What this means is that you cant just start feeding fat and see results, you have to put your horse on a fat-supplemented diet a good month in advance. You also have to challenge his system so that it begins to adapt. This means you have to trains him on this new diet, not just train him conservatively, in order to help him begin to assimilate the new energy source".
  14. Red Cell for energy- You shouldnt use an iron supplement unless the horse has had a blood test and has demonstrated actual anemia. Iron toxicosis is far more common in horses than iron deficiency and the horses body has no way to excrete excess iron. You can add corn/veg/soy oil for more energy. Fat is a "calmer energy" and doesnt cause blood/glucose spikes which can cause over excitability as when feeding grains. Feeding fat also supplies 2.5 times more energy than feeding corn, oats, or barely. No starch in fat. Fat is well tolorated by the horse with no digetive upset. Add slowly. A fat supplemented diet can be up to 8% to 10% of the horses diet. "For reasons we dont yet fully understand, the horses body must "learn" to use fat as an energy source, it can take three to four weeks, and the blood chemistry might continue to adapt for up to six weeks. What this means is that you cant just start feeding fat and see results, you have to put your horse on a fat-supplemented diet a good month in advance. You also have to challenge his system so that it begins to adapt. This means you have to trains him on this new diet, not just train him conservatively, in order to help him begin to assimilate the new energy source".
  15. West Nile Virus * New Question Added*

    Go to "The Horse" Your Guide To Equine Health Care- An Official AAEP Media Partner www.thehorse.com It is free to sign up and they have alot of information about WNV.
  16. West Nile Virus * New Question Added*

    Go to "The Horse" Your Guide To Equine Health Care- An Official AAEP Media Partner www.thehorse.com It is free to sign up and they have alot of information about WNV.
  17. CVM-Stangles

    From: "The Horse" magazine November- "For many viral respiratory diseases immunization is one useful method for prevention and control. But for strangles, that vaccination(even when given per manufactures recommendations)cannot give complete assurance that a horse wont contract the disease." "Strangles vaccines reduce severity of signs by about 60-70%, but none of the available vaccines will create sterile immunnity." "Excellent management- in conjunction with screening and vaccines--significantly decrease risk." For more information on strangles go to www.thehorse.com
  18. CVM-Stangles

    From: "The Horse" magazine November- "For many viral respiratory diseases immunization is one useful method for prevention and control. But for strangles, that vaccination(even when given per manufactures recommendations)cannot give complete assurance that a horse wont contract the disease." "Strangles vaccines reduce severity of signs by about 60-70%, but none of the available vaccines will create sterile immunnity." "Excellent management- in conjunction with screening and vaccines--significantly decrease risk." For more information on strangles go to www.thehorse.com
  19. Is this Colic?

    Yes. It could also be ulcers. Grains cause colic, ulcers, founder, tying up, diarrhea, insulin and glucose spikes. You might want to think about switching over to beet pulp. That is an "easy to digest fiber and safe to feed a gallon or more a day". When a horse doesnt want to eat its grain, it has a stomach ache or ulcers. The stomach produces more acid when grains are given. The hay acts like a "buffer" and if it was alfalfa hay, alfalfa hay helps keep stomach acid down for up to five hours after feeding.
  20. Is this Colic?

    Yes. It could also be ulcers. Grains cause colic, ulcers, founder, tying up, diarrhea, insulin and glucose spikes. You might want to think about switching over to beet pulp. That is an "easy to digest fiber and safe to feed a gallon or more a day". When a horse doesnt want to eat its grain, it has a stomach ache or ulcers. The stomach produces more acid when grains are given. The hay acts like a "buffer" and if it was alfalfa hay, alfalfa hay helps keep stomach acid down for up to five hours after feeding.
  21. To Grain or Not to Grain.... That is the Question

    Fiber is the most important part of the horses diet, not grains. Grains should only be added when the horse is working "hard", such as racing, polo, eventing, endurance, and "sometimes" when the horse has a hard time maintaining weight, then again, there are other feed alternatives for energy and weight besides grains. Keeping the horses diet simple helps keep health problems to a minimum. Research has shown that grains cause colic, founder, ulcers, tying up, diarrhea, insulin/glucose spikes. I truely believe it, for my own horses were always colicking until I took the grains out of their diets. I have a 27 year old that hasnt colicked in 7 years that he has been off grains and usually when the horse gets older, you have more health problems. He is still being worked several times a week and has an attitude of a 15 year old. Feeding grain is more out of ignorance than anything else-the way most horse people know is...my grandfarther fed grain and that is what I know. With computers and all that equine nutrition available to us you would think more horse people would be more concerned about what and why they feed what they do and what is better and why? If a person knows how to ride, why not take the time to know how to take care of that horse from the "inside out"? That means learning "equine nutrition". Its worth the time to pick up a book or magazine or start looking up equine nutrition on the computer if you are on it all the time. Your horse will be healthier and happier if you did take the time and your wallet would be happier too:)..... Most people "over supplement" rather than under supplement.
  22. To Grain or Not to Grain.... That is the Question

    Fiber is the most important part of the horses diet, not grains. Grains should only be added when the horse is working "hard", such as racing, polo, eventing, endurance, and "sometimes" when the horse has a hard time maintaining weight, then again, there are other feed alternatives for energy and weight besides grains. Keeping the horses diet simple helps keep health problems to a minimum. Research has shown that grains cause colic, founder, ulcers, tying up, diarrhea, insulin/glucose spikes. I truely believe it, for my own horses were always colicking until I took the grains out of their diets. I have a 27 year old that hasnt colicked in 7 years that he has been off grains and usually when the horse gets older, you have more health problems. He is still being worked several times a week and has an attitude of a 15 year old. Feeding grain is more out of ignorance than anything else-the way most horse people know is...my grandfarther fed grain and that is what I know. With computers and all that equine nutrition available to us you would think more horse people would be more concerned about what and why they feed what they do and what is better and why? If a person knows how to ride, why not take the time to know how to take care of that horse from the "inside out"? That means learning "equine nutrition". Its worth the time to pick up a book or magazine or start looking up equine nutrition on the computer if you are on it all the time. Your horse will be healthier and happier if you did take the time and your wallet would be happier too:)..... Most people "over supplement" rather than under supplement.
  23. Help please

    "One of the perks of adding fat to the diet of a nursing mare, her foal will tend to gain weight and condition more easily".(Equine nutritionist and feed specialist) The lactating Mare: "Because the lactating mare has the highest nutritional demands of all horses, this is when she needs the most help to receive adequate supplies." "She should be given a very high-quality feed source with a correctly balanced mineral supply-most feeds are too low copper, zinc, and magnesium and high in sodium, potassium, and calcium. She neeeds a readily digestible energy source, perferably "not" based on simple carbohydrates. This translates to a diet high in easily digestible fiber-beet pulp, with some added fat." "During the first three months of lactation she will require: *Energy: 28.6 Mcal/day *Crude protein: 3.15 lbs *Calcium: 56g/day *Potassium: 36g/day *Magnesium: 11g/day *Copper: 30 ppm *Zinc: 60 ppm *Selenium: 0.2 ppm Attention to protein quality really matters at this time. Feed her the better protein source to ensure a supply of good-quality milk for the foal." Beet pulp is an easy to digest fiber and safe to feed as much as you want, a gallon or more a day for hardkeepers. Add a fat oil to this- a cup or 2 a day. Add slowly and work up to the amount you need to get the weight back on. Mix with water, you dont have to soak it, just wet it down to keep the dust down.
  24. Help please

    "One of the perks of adding fat to the diet of a nursing mare, her foal will tend to gain weight and condition more easily".(Equine nutritionist and feed specialist) The lactating Mare: "Because the lactating mare has the highest nutritional demands of all horses, this is when she needs the most help to receive adequate supplies." "She should be given a very high-quality feed source with a correctly balanced mineral supply-most feeds are too low copper, zinc, and magnesium and high in sodium, potassium, and calcium. She neeeds a readily digestible energy source, perferably "not" based on simple carbohydrates. This translates to a diet high in easily digestible fiber-beet pulp, with some added fat." "During the first three months of lactation she will require: *Energy: 28.6 Mcal/day *Crude protein: 3.15 lbs *Calcium: 56g/day *Potassium: 36g/day *Magnesium: 11g/day *Copper: 30 ppm *Zinc: 60 ppm *Selenium: 0.2 ppm Attention to protein quality really matters at this time. Feed her the better protein source to ensure a supply of good-quality milk for the foal." Beet pulp is an easy to digest fiber and safe to feed as much as you want, a gallon or more a day for hardkeepers. Add a fat oil to this- a cup or 2 a day. Add slowly and work up to the amount you need to get the weight back on. Mix with water, you dont have to soak it, just wet it down to keep the dust down.
  25. I need a different feeding program...Any Advice?

    Go to this blog site, they have equine nutrtionist there to help you. http//horsenutrition.blogspot.com