rockysgirl

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About rockysgirl

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    dressage, hunter/jumper, trail riding, driving
  1. Musical Freestyle Video from last weekend!

    Wow, great job! Your horse looks fantastic, and you both did a great job matching your timing to the music!
  2. Safe treats for founder-prone pony

    It may be worth it, too, to consider what kind of hay she's getting. Alfalfa hay can be too high in sugar for the IR horse or pony. It might be worth it to join the board for the hay information to see what you can do for prevention of future laminitis, in terms of testing hay, etc. The board recommendations are pretty strict & intense, but I think it's possible to balance their recommendations with what's reasonable for you and your pony. There are many Canadian members on the Yahoo group, so you should be able to find info that's relevant to your area. Re: the celery, some have had better luck getting horses to accept it as a treat by putting a little salt on it. Good luck!
  3. Safe treats for founder-prone pony

    It may be worth it, too, to consider what kind of hay she's getting. Alfalfa hay can be too high in sugar for the IR horse or pony. It might be worth it to join the board for the hay information to see what you can do for prevention of future laminitis, in terms of testing hay, etc. The board recommendations are pretty strict & intense, but I think it's possible to balance their recommendations with what's reasonable for you and your pony. There are many Canadian members on the Yahoo group, so you should be able to find info that's relevant to your area. Re: the celery, some have had better luck getting horses to accept it as a treat by putting a little salt on it. Good luck!
  4. Safe treats for founder-prone pony

    What a great question! I belong to the Yahoo Equine Cushing's board, and the subject of safe treats comes up often. Here is a snippet from a message posted by noted veterinarian Dr. Eleanor Kellon. "If you absolutely can't resist having something in your hand to give the animal, here are some guidelines: - Absolutely NOTHING that contains grains, flour, processed fats, sugar, honey, molasses. Human foods such as breads, cookies, pasta, or baked horse treats are absolutely the worst. Even the few kernels of grain a pony can scrounge up off the ground after non IR animals are fed is enough to founder an IR pony. I've seen it happen. - No fruits except very small bits of plums (Glycemic index 25), cherries (GI 23) or prunes (GI 16) - No carrots - Safest treat is just to hand feed your horse/pony a bit of the hay or pellets you have tested and know are safe - If your horse/pony is even interested, a small (flat palmful) portion of the following vegetables would be OK: iceberg lettuce, celery, mushroom, fresh parsley - Small palmful of apple peel (no chunks of fruit attached) - Tablespoon of low fat, plain, unsweetened yogurt - Shells and papery outer covering of nuts (save those peanut, pumpkin seed, sunflower seed shells) - Small palmful of shelled peanuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, soybeans (not roasted, flavored or fat added) I have also worked with a group member, Lori Yearwood, in putting together a line of treats for IR horses that are all safe, tested to be low NSC. You can find these at: http://www.skodeshorsetreats.com/ and with another member, Claire Cox-Wilson, on a line of natural and safe flavorings for picky eaters. Find these at: http://witcheyladycreations.com/page13.html Also tested: Low Sugar / Low Carb Horse Cookies by Ms. Red's Horse Cookies www.msredshorsecookies.com Low sugar / low carb horse cookies with a NSC of 5.2%. Ms. Red's Horse Cookies come in seven flavors! saddlebred1986@hotmail.com Dr. Kellon " Others on the board feed celery, iceberg lettuce, and some herbs such as peppermint, chamomile, and rose hips as treats. Good luck with your pony! If you're interested in learning more about insulin resistance (IR), I highly recommend the Yahoo Group: http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/EquineCushings/
  5. Safe treats for founder-prone pony

    What a great question! I belong to the Yahoo Equine Cushing's board, and the subject of safe treats comes up often. Here is a snippet from a message posted by noted veterinarian Dr. Eleanor Kellon. "If you absolutely can't resist having something in your hand to give the animal, here are some guidelines: - Absolutely NOTHING that contains grains, flour, processed fats, sugar, honey, molasses. Human foods such as breads, cookies, pasta, or baked horse treats are absolutely the worst. Even the few kernels of grain a pony can scrounge up off the ground after non IR animals are fed is enough to founder an IR pony. I've seen it happen. - No fruits except very small bits of plums (Glycemic index 25), cherries (GI 23) or prunes (GI 16) - No carrots - Safest treat is just to hand feed your horse/pony a bit of the hay or pellets you have tested and know are safe - If your horse/pony is even interested, a small (flat palmful) portion of the following vegetables would be OK: iceberg lettuce, celery, mushroom, fresh parsley - Small palmful of apple peel (no chunks of fruit attached) - Tablespoon of low fat, plain, unsweetened yogurt - Shells and papery outer covering of nuts (save those peanut, pumpkin seed, sunflower seed shells) - Small palmful of shelled peanuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, soybeans (not roasted, flavored or fat added) I have also worked with a group member, Lori Yearwood, in putting together a line of treats for IR horses that are all safe, tested to be low NSC. You can find these at: http://www.skodeshorsetreats.com/ and with another member, Claire Cox-Wilson, on a line of natural and safe flavorings for picky eaters. Find these at: http://witcheyladycreations.com/page13.html Also tested: Low Sugar / Low Carb Horse Cookies by Ms. Red's Horse Cookies www.msredshorsecookies.com Low sugar / low carb horse cookies with a NSC of 5.2%. Ms. Red's Horse Cookies come in seven flavors! saddlebred1986@hotmail.com Dr. Kellon " Others on the board feed celery, iceberg lettuce, and some herbs such as peppermint, chamomile, and rose hips as treats. Good luck with your pony! If you're interested in learning more about insulin resistance (IR), I highly recommend the Yahoo Group: http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/EquineCushings/
  6. Wide saddle for draft cross - do they even exist???

    Argh! I've been searching online for weeks for a wide or probably extra wide AP saddle for my Percheron Paint cross, and I am beginning to despair! Either the saddles are a fortune, or are, well, made out of cardboard leather. Anyone have any tips for finding saddles to fit the wide guys? I've got back & wither tracings, but I'm not sure where in the tracing to measure for the centimeter measurement of tree width. I do know my medium-wide Crosby (which I dearly love, and wish I could somehow magically expand) is not wide enough. I can find a fair number of wide tree dressage saddles, but that's not what I'm interested in. Help!
  7. Argh! I've been searching online for weeks for a wide or probably extra wide AP saddle for my Percheron Paint cross, and I am beginning to despair! Either the saddles are a fortune, or are, well, made out of cardboard leather. Anyone have any tips for finding saddles to fit the wide guys? I've got back & wither tracings, but I'm not sure where in the tracing to measure for the centimeter measurement of tree width. I do know my medium-wide Crosby (which I dearly love, and wish I could somehow magically expand) is not wide enough. I can find a fair number of wide tree dressage saddles, but that's not what I'm interested in. Help!
  8. boots for draft cross?

    well, thanks for the realistic answers, anyway. If only the boots weren't so darn expensive, it would be easier to experiment!
  9. boots for draft cross?

    pianoforte01, I'm hesitant to shoe him, as ice season will be here sooner than I'd like, and the discomfort is limited to surfaces that he's not on 90% of the time. He comes into the barn just fine every night, it's just balancing a rider's weight over trickier surfaces that bothers him. If he's still having the same problems next spring, we may need to go to shoes, but I'd like to hold off on that as long as possible.
  10. boots for draft cross?

    Thanks for the reply! His feet are a good size, but not as huge as they could be; he's only 16.1 or 16.2, so that + the paint blood may have moderated their size a bit. So, I'm hoping we'll still fit w/in the range of possibilities.
  11. boots for draft cross?

    Hey all you drafties and draft cross owners, I need your feedback! I have a draft cross (Percheron/Paint), and his feet are a little touchy in the front. The farrier says his feet are a little soft, but I've only had him for a few months, so I am hoping that long term nutritional changes will help. But, in the short term, I think boots would help him be more comfortable when riding over gravel or uneven surfaces, which is the only time he gets a little ouchy. Another boarder at my barn likes the Cavallo boots for her QH, but I'm wondering --> does anyone out there have experience w/booting the big guys? Thanks!
  12. founder/farrier catch-22

    Warning: the following is coming from a very tired person. So, if it is rambling and a little hysterical, please be kind. I am caught in a dilemma, and am worn down to the nubbin from many things both horsey and non, so I need some help. The question is, which farrier to go with? Background: My senior citizen Cushings horse has foundered w/rotation (7.5 degrees on LF, 11 degrees on RF). He's on Pergolide, and I know about the Yahoo group, and the vet doesn't believe this was a sudden thing, but rather a slow rotation due to the Cushings, season change, and the little time he's been on Pergolide/special diet. So, this is NOT a Cushings question. I'm padding him to keep him comfortable, and his attitude is pretty good -- don't think the pain is horrifying, just present. Here's the problem: my regular farrier is on the DL due to a back injury, so I'm hounding backup options. My options are A) my barn mgr's farrier, who is coming tonight, but whose trimming style may not suit me or my foundered guy or my friend's farrier, who is patient and good according to my friend, but whom I've never observed. Option A has not returned my call to ask if I could be added to the list, but may allow it anyway if I show up and ask. However, he has many horses on the list tonight, and I expect that the founder treatment is going to take awhile, and probably shouldn't be rushed. Option B DID return my call same day, but can't come until tomorrow morning. There are other factors, but they're more conjecture on my part. So, Option A or Option B? Thanks!
  13. Do you agree with her?

    I will qualify my own reply with my lack of religious background (parents are "recovering Catholics), but it always bothers me when those who profess to be part of a religion that preaches God's love/Jesus's love seem to thing that there is an asterisk on that love. What kind of higher power would put a disclaimer on love for his/her/its subjects? "Offer not valid to all creatures, some faiths may not apply, please see your local preacher for details on this offer"??? I think that putting goodwill out in whatever form (thoughts, prayers) for someone you care about is valid, no matter how many legs that someone has, or if he/she knows how to wipe their feet at the front door. So often, we are treated to kindness from animals when we don't even deserve it. It is only right that we send the love back their way. As a side bar, you may find that good works (also part of many religions) are as rewarding as prayer. Good works done on behalf of animals is, IMHO, divine.
  14. Im considering putting him down. (hes gone)

    No problem, jumpin. The IR topic is near to my heart, as Rocky was diagnosed w/IR and Cushing's this summer. So, I've also been thinking ahead. For now, we're working on managing him, and he is mostly happy (though in his opinion, the grazing muzzle is a bizarre contraption he's tolerating for my sake alone). Thank goodness Pergolide comes in wafer form. But, I've been thinking a lot about his quality of life (dry lot isolation would also not be for him in the long term), and so I suspect I'll have a similar decision at some point in the (hopefully distant) future. My grandmother also died this summer; she hung on for about two weeks in a semi-comatose state after a long slide down Alzheimers, and all I could think was "I'll never let this happen for my animals". So, good luck to you, and kudus for being a wonderful friend to your horse.
  15. Im considering putting him down. (hes gone)

    No problem, jumpin. The IR topic is near to my heart, as Rocky was diagnosed w/IR and Cushing's this summer. So, I've also been thinking ahead. For now, we're working on managing him, and he is mostly happy (though in his opinion, the grazing muzzle is a bizarre contraption he's tolerating for my sake alone). Thank goodness Pergolide comes in wafer form. But, I've been thinking a lot about his quality of life (dry lot isolation would also not be for him in the long term), and so I suspect I'll have a similar decision at some point in the (hopefully distant) future. My grandmother also died this summer; she hung on for about two weeks in a semi-comatose state after a long slide down Alzheimers, and all I could think was "I'll never let this happen for my animals". So, good luck to you, and kudus for being a wonderful friend to your horse.