Hindasmom

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  1. Daily dewormer and probiotics

    Bucksl: I haven't found that probiotics help much. Why are you worming daily? If the horse is in a rotated paddock or a clean stall, there is not a great chance of picking up new worms in cold weather, though some kinds remain active and have complex life cycles. Any medication you introduce has risk of harm along with the beneficial effects, so I try to give as few meds as possible unless they are necessary. WOrms can develop immunity to drugs, too, so more is not better. I agree about the bots. Use a bat knife or similar tool to remove every one you find, and yes, you do have to check for them. Contact your agricultural extension service for information on what varieties of worms and other pests are most active in your region and what is currently effective for controlling them. try to keep your senior horse adequately watered, exercised, well nourished and groomed. A healthy horse is a better defense against pests than chemicals in many cases.
  2. Daily dewormer and probiotics

    Bucksl: I haven't found that probiotics help much. Why are you worming daily? If the horse is in a rotated paddock or a clean stall, there is not a great chance of picking up new worms in cold weather, though some kinds remain active and have complex life cycles. Any medication you introduce has risk of harm along with the beneficial effects, so I try to give as few meds as possible unless they are necessary. WOrms can develop immunity to drugs, too, so more is not better. I agree about the bots. Use a bat knife or similar tool to remove every one you find, and yes, you do have to check for them. Contact your agricultural extension service for information on what varieties of worms and other pests are most active in your region and what is currently effective for controlling them. try to keep your senior horse adequately watered, exercised, well nourished and groomed. A healthy horse is a better defense against pests than chemicals in many cases.
  3. Funny Skin Scabs? HELP!!

    From the description it sounds like this could be ringworm. But it isn't worm, it's a fungal infection, highly contagious to man and beast, not usually dangerous, but forms roughly circular patches with crusty yellow edges and sometimes red bumps filled with fluid. Often the hair inside the rings falls out or gets thin. It likes to grow where it is dark and damp and warm, like the hide of a horse under a blanket. Worming will not kill it. You will have to decontaminate everything that has touched the affected animal, do NOT share grooming or feeding equipment, and clean those blankets, please.
  4. Funny Skin Scabs? HELP!!

    From the description it sounds like this could be ringworm. But it isn't worm, it's a fungal infection, highly contagious to man and beast, not usually dangerous, but forms roughly circular patches with crusty yellow edges and sometimes red bumps filled with fluid. Often the hair inside the rings falls out or gets thin. It likes to grow where it is dark and damp and warm, like the hide of a horse under a blanket. Worming will not kill it. You will have to decontaminate everything that has touched the affected animal, do NOT share grooming or feeding equipment, and clean those blankets, please.
  5. Icthamol for small puncture wound?

    The horse's body is warm, and you want to flush out any junk that may be in the wound, so why don't you think it's possible to hose it? Get a big syringe, like the ones used for oral drenches and worming meds, clean it, fill it with warm salt water or diluted peroxide, and clean out the wound. Then cover it with icthammol or furazone or bag balm or whatever you like and a loose, absorbent, clean wrapping. This may sound strange, but sanitary pads work pretty well. Keep checking it to see if it's oozing, swelling, turning funny colors, if the hair around it is falling out, if it smells bad. Punctures don't usually bleed much, they heal slowly, and you want it to heal from the inside, so keep the opening open and clean.
  6. Icthamol for small puncture wound?

    The horse's body is warm, and you want to flush out any junk that may be in the wound, so why don't you think it's possible to hose it? Get a big syringe, like the ones used for oral drenches and worming meds, clean it, fill it with warm salt water or diluted peroxide, and clean out the wound. Then cover it with icthammol or furazone or bag balm or whatever you like and a loose, absorbent, clean wrapping. This may sound strange, but sanitary pads work pretty well. Keep checking it to see if it's oozing, swelling, turning funny colors, if the hair around it is falling out, if it smells bad. Punctures don't usually bleed much, they heal slowly, and you want it to heal from the inside, so keep the opening open and clean.
  7. "Update" is she foaling"Update"

    Make sure her tail and vagina are clean. Try to braid and tie up the tail if you can, and wash the bag. Let her have plenty of water and free-shoice minerals. She may sweat a lot in the delivery, and if her minerals get low it can be risky for her and the foal. Stay clear of her hooves, as she may kick unpredictably during the labor. Is that baby here yet?
  8. "Update" is she foaling"Update"

    Make sure her tail and vagina are clean. Try to braid and tie up the tail if you can, and wash the bag. Let her have plenty of water and free-shoice minerals. She may sweat a lot in the delivery, and if her minerals get low it can be risky for her and the foal. Stay clear of her hooves, as she may kick unpredictably during the labor. Is that baby here yet?
  9. Baybandme: Some mares collect goo in their vaginas, and some make a waxy substance on their udders. You have to wash it off or it can cause skin irritation. Some of them just seem to get clean when we hose them and scrub them. Some horses rub on trees, fences, whatever. There are horses, usually geldings and studs, who have the reputation of masturbating, and owners have put posts about belly-high, called "pleasure sticks", in the pen for them. I wonder how much of that kind of behavior is just scratching irritated sheaths.
  10. Baybandme: Some mares collect goo in their vaginas, and some make a waxy substance on their udders. You have to wash it off or it can cause skin irritation. Some of them just seem to get clean when we hose them and scrub them. Some horses rub on trees, fences, whatever. There are horses, usually geldings and studs, who have the reputation of masturbating, and owners have put posts about belly-high, called "pleasure sticks", in the pen for them. I wonder how much of that kind of behavior is just scratching irritated sheaths.
  11. Mare in heat

    By "sewn", do you mean her vaginal opening is sewn shut? If that's what you mean, yes, the estrus cycle of her internal organs is unaffected by anything on the outside. Or do you mean that her uterus and ovaried were removed (this is sometimes done after serious foaling injuries to the dam, or following metritus )? If there are no ovaries there will be no corpus luteum, no estrus.
  12. Mare in heat

    By "sewn", do you mean her vaginal opening is sewn shut? If that's what you mean, yes, the estrus cycle of her internal organs is unaffected by anything on the outside. Or do you mean that her uterus and ovaried were removed (this is sometimes done after serious foaling injuries to the dam, or following metritus )? If there are no ovaries there will be no corpus luteum, no estrus.
  13. I Need Some Help With new filly

    Mange is caused by one of several species of mite. Ivermectin will kill it, but you have to dose the horse through the whole life cycle of the mite. It will also wipe out lots of species of intestinal worms, but not tapeworms. Lice are another matter entirely. On the other hand, if it's a fungal infection, and you are giving antibiotics for the infected leg, it will tend to make any fungal infestations worse. It will also imbalance or reduce the intestinal flora, so you are likely to get diarrhea and worsen any girth itch, seedy toe and other conditions where fungus and mold and yeast are factors. Is it possible to give these babies a hot bath? I'd like to see a bucket with very diluted bleach (yes, that's right. It kills fungus, removes lots of bacterial garbage, dead tissue, bacteria, and can do some of the fighting against other skin bugs the filly may have). Wear gloves and don't let it get near her nose, eyes, mouth, or anal or vaginal openings. You may want to wipe those places with warm, plain water on a soft cloth and then coat the skin with petroleum jelly. This will keep the bleach-washing solution and the "bugs" off the cleaned tissue for a while. You can use diluted human shampoo or dish detergent. Wear rubber gloves and an apron, and if you can, use a natural plant bristle brush, like tampico or something, rather than boar or metal bristles, which may be damaged by the chlorine. Good luck with her!
  14. I Need Some Help With new filly

    Mange is caused by one of several species of mite. Ivermectin will kill it, but you have to dose the horse through the whole life cycle of the mite. It will also wipe out lots of species of intestinal worms, but not tapeworms. Lice are another matter entirely. On the other hand, if it's a fungal infection, and you are giving antibiotics for the infected leg, it will tend to make any fungal infestations worse. It will also imbalance or reduce the intestinal flora, so you are likely to get diarrhea and worsen any girth itch, seedy toe and other conditions where fungus and mold and yeast are factors. Is it possible to give these babies a hot bath? I'd like to see a bucket with very diluted bleach (yes, that's right. It kills fungus, removes lots of bacterial garbage, dead tissue, bacteria, and can do some of the fighting against other skin bugs the filly may have). Wear gloves and don't let it get near her nose, eyes, mouth, or anal or vaginal openings. You may want to wipe those places with warm, plain water on a soft cloth and then coat the skin with petroleum jelly. This will keep the bleach-washing solution and the "bugs" off the cleaned tissue for a while. You can use diluted human shampoo or dish detergent. Wear rubber gloves and an apron, and if you can, use a natural plant bristle brush, like tampico or something, rather than boar or metal bristles, which may be damaged by the chlorine. Good luck with her!
  15. New horse-- breathing problems.. .allergies?

    Check with anyone who owned or cared for him before you got him to see if and when he had similar symptoms. Some horses have allergies or sensitivites, just like people, and it may be that something in the environment, whether it's dust or mold in the hay, or some kind of spray or solvent used in the barn, or a chemical that's used in the field, or smoke or fumes in the air, that are irritating him. Usually if there's an infection there will be elevated temperature and other signs, like a discharge from the nose, redness or sores in the mouth, on the tongue or in the throat. Please don't start giving medication or supplements before you know what the problem is.