UCequest

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About UCequest

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    CO
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    What do you think?
  1. Superficial Hoof Cracks

    Frequent consistant farrier care and a good diet will help. Hoof oils and such actually seal moisture out...there was a good article on that in John Lyons magazine recently I think. Toe cracks are normally indications the toe is too long or the heels are too high putting pressure/leverage on the toe, or a combination of both. Quarter cracks are usually from having heels that aren't trimmed enough or are "left alone so they'll grow taller!" and what really happens is they start to grow under and get under run. This puts strain/pressure at the quarters. Or they can be caused by having a low heel or underrun heel combined with a long toe, also causing a prying force. A hoof growth cycle is normally 8-12 months, so your horse has most likely had a full growth cycle if not close too it since you've owned her. If after a few more months she still has chronic cracks...superficial or not, then the farrier isn't being able to trim her often enough or he isn't keeping her balanced and you might try a different farrier for a while and see what happens.
  2. Superficial Hoof Cracks

    Frequent consistant farrier care and a good diet will help. Hoof oils and such actually seal moisture out...there was a good article on that in John Lyons magazine recently I think. Toe cracks are normally indications the toe is too long or the heels are too high putting pressure/leverage on the toe, or a combination of both. Quarter cracks are usually from having heels that aren't trimmed enough or are "left alone so they'll grow taller!" and what really happens is they start to grow under and get under run. This puts strain/pressure at the quarters. Or they can be caused by having a low heel or underrun heel combined with a long toe, also causing a prying force. A hoof growth cycle is normally 8-12 months, so your horse has most likely had a full growth cycle if not close too it since you've owned her. If after a few more months she still has chronic cracks...superficial or not, then the farrier isn't being able to trim her often enough or he isn't keeping her balanced and you might try a different farrier for a while and see what happens.
  3. Barefooted horses

    Oh, I forgot....some really good books are "Making Natural Hoof Care Work for You" by Pete Ramey and "Horse Owner's Guide to Natural Hoof Care" by Jaime Jackson Both can be gotten on amazon.com That will really give you a ton of info and answer all your questions. It talks about how to properly trim.
  4. Barefooted horses

    Oh, I forgot....some really good books are "Making Natural Hoof Care Work for You" by Pete Ramey and "Horse Owner's Guide to Natural Hoof Care" by Jaime Jackson Both can be gotten on amazon.com That will really give you a ton of info and answer all your questions. It talks about how to properly trim.
  5. Barefooted horses

    No need for shoeing him if you get a well balanced trim. I live in CO and ride my horses on mountain trails barefoot. It took them some time to condition their hooves to it. When I first pulled their shoes they couldn't have done it but with conditioning they tromp across anything now. If you house your horse on soft terrain add some gravel in his pasture where he has to cross over it a few times a day, like in a gateway or around the water trough. This really helps toughen them up. If you want to ride in a terrain that your horse isn't used to Hoof Boots work great. Take them along with you on the trail, if your horse get's gimpy and tells you he needs them jump off and put them on. Someone mentioned the AANHCP recommends Swiss Boots...they used to but they now mostly recommend Boas and Epics. You can look at www.easycareinc.com Boa boots are really good and easy to put on...more user friendly. That's what I have. Epics are great for more competitive or long rides. They are less bulky than the Boas. There is a person that posts on this board named OzarkTrailRider or something like that. She rides barefoot in the Buffalo river area (North AR, some of the rockiest terrain in the US) on all her horses. They used to be shod but found they do even better barefoot. You might go look at some websites that talk specifically about barefoot horses like www.equethy.com www.healthyhoof.com www.drabekhoofcare.com ...all that good stuff....there are a lot of sites on the subject.
  6. Barefooted horses

    No need for shoeing him if you get a well balanced trim. I live in CO and ride my horses on mountain trails barefoot. It took them some time to condition their hooves to it. When I first pulled their shoes they couldn't have done it but with conditioning they tromp across anything now. If you house your horse on soft terrain add some gravel in his pasture where he has to cross over it a few times a day, like in a gateway or around the water trough. This really helps toughen them up. If you want to ride in a terrain that your horse isn't used to Hoof Boots work great. Take them along with you on the trail, if your horse get's gimpy and tells you he needs them jump off and put them on. Someone mentioned the AANHCP recommends Swiss Boots...they used to but they now mostly recommend Boas and Epics. You can look at www.easycareinc.com Boa boots are really good and easy to put on...more user friendly. That's what I have. Epics are great for more competitive or long rides. They are less bulky than the Boas. There is a person that posts on this board named OzarkTrailRider or something like that. She rides barefoot in the Buffalo river area (North AR, some of the rockiest terrain in the US) on all her horses. They used to be shod but found they do even better barefoot. You might go look at some websites that talk specifically about barefoot horses like www.equethy.com www.healthyhoof.com www.drabekhoofcare.com ...all that good stuff....there are a lot of sites on the subject.
  7. Hock Injections-Do they work?

    www.texashorsetalk.com/dubois.htm Here is an article I recently ran across online when doing some research for a paper. My vet pretty much does the same thing...before any sort of joint injection he always closely looks at hoof angle and boney column alignment. I'm in vet school and we are taught 90% of lameness issues are hoof related/caused. Often just the slightest incorrect angle, for instance being a bit underrun in the rear hooves, will put strain on the hocks over time. Or if he is having issues with his front legs or hooves they will often hold more weight on the back then normal to alleviate discomfort, also causing hock or stifle problems. After some balanced hoof care symptoms often improve and if you maintain it they will usually disappear. If the symptoms don't change at all it's then that you can start looking into genetics. Hope that helps or at least give you some options to look into.
  8. Hock Injections-Do they work?

    www.texashorsetalk.com/dubois.htm Here is an article I recently ran across online when doing some research for a paper. My vet pretty much does the same thing...before any sort of joint injection he always closely looks at hoof angle and boney column alignment. I'm in vet school and we are taught 90% of lameness issues are hoof related/caused. Often just the slightest incorrect angle, for instance being a bit underrun in the rear hooves, will put strain on the hocks over time. Or if he is having issues with his front legs or hooves they will often hold more weight on the back then normal to alleviate discomfort, also causing hock or stifle problems. After some balanced hoof care symptoms often improve and if you maintain it they will usually disappear. If the symptoms don't change at all it's then that you can start looking into genetics. Hope that helps or at least give you some options to look into.
  9. how to treat white line disease?

    Clean Trax! We rescued a TB filly that had WLD and she has a clean bill of "foot health" now and is high performance sound...My farrier and equine vet both swear by it. You can go to http://www17.serrahost.com/servlet/equinep...t+Care+Products Click on Clean Trax to get more info on it...
  10. how to treat white line disease?

    Clean Trax! We rescued a TB filly that had WLD and she has a clean bill of "foot health" now and is high performance sound...My farrier and equine vet both swear by it. You can go to http://www17.serrahost.com/servlet/equinep...t+Care+Products Click on Clean Trax to get more info on it...
  11. Dealing with a foundered horse.

    Also, believe it or not, they now recommend not stall confining them. Moving in circles is very painful for a foundered horse and can actually increase the chance of the bone dropping through the sole. They should be able to move as their body sees fit and in a stall they are forced to only move in a circle. Circulation is critical to help heal the hoof and flush the toxins out to prevent further founder. Stalling creates horrible circulation causing many horses to stock up or have swelling. So keeping them out on a dry lot paddock is best so they can move around, even if they don't move around much at first. Offer a padded area (straw, hay, shavings, or sand, etc.) to stand on or lie down on if they choose and let their water trough run over so they can stand in the mud...they sometimes find relief in that. They will do what their body tells them too. I wouldn't recommend backwards shoes though. From what I've read and seen, while some horses luckily make it through, foundered horses shod with backwards shoes have the highest chance of the CB penetrating. Being backwards the shoe doesn't take pressure off as once thought, instead it actually shifts the horse forwards (they will lean towards the open area of the shoe) and this not only creates pressure points where the shoe ends on each side it basically gives the coffin bone a hole to fall through. You actually want to support the coffin bone so it does not shift or drop any further, not leave it suspended so that it drives downward with each step. It's so hard to explain.... [ 09-04-2005, 02:28 PM: Message edited by: UCequest ]
  12. Dealing with a foundered horse.

    Also, believe it or not, they now recommend not stall confining them. Moving in circles is very painful for a foundered horse and can actually increase the chance of the bone dropping through the sole. They should be able to move as their body sees fit and in a stall they are forced to only move in a circle. Circulation is critical to help heal the hoof and flush the toxins out to prevent further founder. Stalling creates horrible circulation causing many horses to stock up or have swelling. So keeping them out on a dry lot paddock is best so they can move around, even if they don't move around much at first. Offer a padded area (straw, hay, shavings, or sand, etc.) to stand on or lie down on if they choose and let their water trough run over so they can stand in the mud...they sometimes find relief in that. They will do what their body tells them too. I wouldn't recommend backwards shoes though. From what I've read and seen, while some horses luckily make it through, foundered horses shod with backwards shoes have the highest chance of the CB penetrating. Being backwards the shoe doesn't take pressure off as once thought, instead it actually shifts the horse forwards (they will lean towards the open area of the shoe) and this not only creates pressure points where the shoe ends on each side it basically gives the coffin bone a hole to fall through. You actually want to support the coffin bone so it does not shift or drop any further, not leave it suspended so that it drives downward with each step. It's so hard to explain.... [ 09-04-2005, 02:28 PM: Message edited by: UCequest ]
  13. Dealing with a foundered horse.

    Please go read the FAQ section of this farriers site... www.keithseeley.com partcularly about pads, shoes, etc. There has been A lot lot lot of research at many universities here and overseas the past decade that has changed the way many up to date farriers and vets view how to best treat founder. Unfortunately unlike medical doctors who by law have to stay updated on the latest treatments, farriers don't, so they will still do what they were taught 20 years ago and think you are crazy if you say you don't want to apply shoes. The vets at my University have treated quite a few foundered horses over the years this way the above guy does with dramatic success to compare it to the "conventional" treatment they would have normally prescribed. What they have found is this new way is far more effective, quicker and gives long term soundness compared to the traditional way. Every horse treated this way went back to being fully sound and rideable, while only some of the shod horses did and the others were never considered completely sound. Anyhow, food for thought...just another treatment option to look at. My farrier has a few founders to the point of coffin bone penetration that he treated this way and they are doing great and recovering well. He's pleasantly surprised that something so simple can work so well.
  14. Dealing with a foundered horse.

    Please go read the FAQ section of this farriers site... www.keithseeley.com partcularly about pads, shoes, etc. There has been A lot lot lot of research at many universities here and overseas the past decade that has changed the way many up to date farriers and vets view how to best treat founder. Unfortunately unlike medical doctors who by law have to stay updated on the latest treatments, farriers don't, so they will still do what they were taught 20 years ago and think you are crazy if you say you don't want to apply shoes. The vets at my University have treated quite a few foundered horses over the years this way the above guy does with dramatic success to compare it to the "conventional" treatment they would have normally prescribed. What they have found is this new way is far more effective, quicker and gives long term soundness compared to the traditional way. Every horse treated this way went back to being fully sound and rideable, while only some of the shod horses did and the others were never considered completely sound. Anyhow, food for thought...just another treatment option to look at. My farrier has a few founders to the point of coffin bone penetration that he treated this way and they are doing great and recovering well. He's pleasantly surprised that something so simple can work so well.
  15. The Hoof Color myth is just that...a myth. It is nothing more than pigment...that would be like saying black skin is different than white skin. It's the same, just merely a different color. You should educate yourself on bare hooves so you can know what to be looking for. Most farrier's know shod hooves. And they trim bare hooves the way they would trim it if they were putting a shoe on. This will make most horses sore while barefoot. All horses may not need shoes, but all horses DO need proper trimming. Shod or not. I suspect your new farrier isn't doing something right whether it's removing the calluses or putting them at the wrong angles. Also horses shouldn't be allowed to get long, they should be maintained and trimmed before they get long. If not they will get flaring and this pulls and tears on their laminae...that hurts! Make absolute sure your farrier isn't scraping off the sole giving them no protection, but also not leaving them all lumpy with pressure points. Check out sites like www.ironfreehoof.com www.tribeequus.com www.equinextion.com and others that will help you recognize a good trim from a bad and what makes a healthy hard bare hoof. I have two Thoroughbreds (*gasp* race breds! With four white hooves between the two!) that I thought would always need shoes. Due to various reasons my vet and I pulled their shoes and began using a trimmer that specialized in bare hooves. They are more than sound and I live on the edge of the Rocky Mountains. We compete regularly in Jumping and Cross Country. They have rocks all througout their paddocks. That goes for all the barefoot TB/Warmblood broodmares and lesson horses at my boarding stable too. See if you can perhaps find a trimmer that would be more familiar with bare feet rather than shod feet? Worth a try before going and shoeing the horses. [ 08-22-2005, 03:56 PM: Message edited by: UCequest ]